Beacon Lesson Plan Library

Help Me Find My Keys

Vivian Sharp
Duval County Schools

Description

Students write a five-paragraph essay on the topic: What mistakes have you made and then learned a life lesson from the experience? The teacher provides an example of a life dilemma, such as how to avoid locking keys in the car.

Objectives

The student drafts and revises writing that: is focused, purposeful, and reflects insight into the writing situation; has an organizational pattern that provides for a logical progression of ideas; has effective use of transitional devices that contribute to a sense of completeness; has support that is substantial, specific, relevant, and concrete; demonstrates a commitment to and involvement with the subject; uses creative writing strategies as appropriate to the purpose of the paper; demonstrates a mature command of language with precision of expression; has varied sentence structure; and has few, if any, convention errors in mechanics, usage, punctuation, and spelling.

Materials

-Overhead projector
-Transparencies
-Markers
-Pen or pencil
-Paper

Preparations

1. Create a preprinted transparency with a sample essay.
2. Create a list of real-world dilemmas as suggestions.
3. Obtain a copy of the rubric for [Florida Writes].

Procedures

Day 1
Note: This lesson will only focus on previously taught skills of organization when writing an essay.

1. Ask students if they have ever experienced being told not to do something, and they did it on purpose because they were told not to. For example: Donít touch a hot stove because youíll get burned.

2. Discuss what happens when we make mistakes, but we learn to not do that again because we could get hurt.

3. Explain that we will be writing an essay that will tell how our mistakes make us learn lessons.

4. Provide a rubric and review the objectives.

5. Encourage students to share their experiences in groups of four.

6. Have the students evaluate what life lessons they feel will meet the criteria for the writing assignment. The group must agree on the lessons that could be included in the writing.

7. Ask students to share ideas with the entire group to analyze whether the ideas fit what life lessons we feel will be quality work in an essay.

8. Use an overhead projector to share ideas, pointing out that even though some things we learn not to do because we could get hurt, other lessons are learned so as to allow us to grow.

9. Provide a personal experience of a common mistake made in every day life. For example, how to remember not to lock keys in the car. Have students suggest ways to a avoid locking keys in the car. Write the suggestions on the overhead to build an introduction.

10. Write the introduction as a collaborative group.

11. Individually, have students write their rough drafts.

12. Monitor and provide feedback as they develop their introductions.

Day 2

1. Have students voluntarily read their rough drafts aloud. Other students are given the opportunity to critique the rough drafts.

2. Provide suggestions as needed.

3. Students begin developing the body of the essay.

4. Periodically monitor to see if students are referring to their rubric.

5. Monitor and provide feedback for the rough draft of the body.


Day 3

1. Have students voluntarily read their rough drafts aloud. Other students are given the opportunity to critique.

2. Provide suggestions as needed.

3. Tell the students they are ready to form a conclusion, paying special attention not to repeat the introduction.

4. Have students participate in writing the conclusion from Day 1ís sample introduction.

Day 4 and Day 5

1. Have students rewrite and revise their drafts as needed.

2. Assess the activity.

Assessments

As a formative assessment, observe for on-task behaviors, peer group behaviors, individual comprehension of task behaviors, and writing completeness.<br><br>
Assess the narrative for the following criteria:
-Focused.
-Has organizational pattern.
-Has logical progression of ideas.
-Has support that is substantial, specific, relevant, and concrete.
-Has varied sentence structure.
-Has few, if any, convention errors in mechanics, usage, punctuation, and spelling.
Use Rubric for writing a narrative essay. (Use FL Writes Rubrics.)

Attached Files

Attached file.     File Extension: pdf

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