Beacon Lesson Plan Library

Pattern People

Lore Davis
Alachua County Schools

Description

The student will describe a wide variety of classification schemes and patterns related to physical characteristics and sensory attributes of people and will recognize, extend and create a wide variety of those patterns and relations.

Objectives

The student describes a wide variety of classification schemes and patterns related to physical characteristics and sensory attributes, such as rhythm, sound, shapes, colors, numbers, similar objects, similar events.

The student recognizes, extends, generalizes, and creates a wide variety of patterns and relationships using symbols and objects.

Materials

-People manipulatives in a variety of colors, sizes and/or patterned clothes
-8 1/2- x 11- paper for each child
-Crayons or markers for student use in recording patterns
-Chart of the song -Miss Mary Mack-
-Strips of transparent neon-colored book covers

Preparations

The teacher should prepare the following materials for student use:

-People manipulatives in a variety of colors, sizes and/or patterned clothes (These can also be purchased.)
-8 1/2- x 11- paper for each child
-Crayons or markers for student use in recording patterns
-Chart of the song -Miss Mary Mack-
-Strips of transparent neon-colored book covers.

Procedures

1. Sing the song, -Miss Mary Mack,- with the children. Point to the words on the chart as the class sings. After singing the song once, remind the children that they will be Pattern Detectives as they set out to look for patterns. Ask children to tell you what a pattern is (something that repeats itself). Ask children for examples of a patterns in the room. Ask for examples of a math, science and language pattern. As part of the review, select children to go to the chart and cover pattern words with the transparent neon book cover strips.

2. Ask students to share the patterns they think of in their own lives as they work as detectives. The students might tell about the pattern, actually point out the pattern or they may illustrate the pattern.

3. Next, sing the song again and model doing a hand clap game with another child for the song. An example would be to sit or stand in front of a child and alternate clapping hands and then hitting another child's hands on the palms (like when holding up 10 fingers). When you get to the repeated word (ex. Mack, Mack, Mack), you and the child should hit each other's hands three times and then continue the pattern. After modeling this activity, pair students up to participate in the song and hand clap pattern game. This activity allows students to more easily hear the pattern and helps them better understand a pattern because they are using more than one sense.

4. Then, have students work together to create a people pattern using themselves. The teacher might start them off by having the children stand in a boy/girl pattern. Other patterns might include dress/pants/, shorts/pants, color of hair, length of hair, solid/printed clothes, type of shoes. State the pattern orally, boy girl/boy girl/boy girl and state it as an AB/AB/AB pattern. Write this on the board. Make sure to provide all students with the opportunity to identify, extend and create their own patterns.

5. Have students sit in a circle with the teacher. Pour a bowl of people manipulatives out on the table/floor. Have students describe the people (big/medium/small, red/blue/green/, women/men/boys/girls). Students should take turns creating and extending patterns with the people manipulatives. The manipulatives should be placed on a dry erase board or a chalk board. Label them as they are placed on the board.

Group Work:

Students should work in cooperative groups of 2 or 3 children. Students take turns extending and creating patterns with their partners. They must then create and record a pattern of their choice and label it, if possible. This will be done on 8 1/2- x 11- paper. The teacher will observe as the students work together.

Wrap Up:

Students will return to the group and share their patterns.

Encourage students to continue on their investigation and to bring more patterns in from school and home.

Assessments

This activity will be assessed through teacher observation and interview of the student and the student's record in which he/she demonstrates
-recognizing a pattern
-extending a pattern
-creating a pattern that repeats itself at least three times
-describing their pattern according to attributes

Extensions

Return to the Beacon Lesson Plan Library.