Beacon Lesson Plan Library

Analogies in Foreign Language Classes

Joanna Lowe
Orange County Schools

Description

Students decipher and create analogies in the target language.

Objectives

The student uses target-language vocabulary or concepts to reinforce knowledge of a related topic studied in another class (e.g., geographical place names, parts of the body, or basic mathematical operations).

Materials

-Overhead transparencies
-Overhead markers
-Printed associated files

Preparations

1. Familiarize yourself with how analogies are set up and their classifications. (See Associated File)
2. Prepare a sample list of analogies on an overhead for a whole-class activity or on paper for distribution to small groups or individual students.
3. Choose a topic or topics on which you want your students to base their list of analogies.
4. Gather enough transparencies and markers for each group or individual students.

Procedures

1. For students not exposed previously to analogies in their English classes, explain how analogies are set up and the variety of classifications. (See Associated File)

2. As a whole-class activity, a small-group activity, or individually, give students a list of analogies in the target language for the class or each group to decipher. (See Associated File)

3. Each individual student or small group is required to create 10 analogies within a certain topic. The topics are the choice of the individual teacher, depending on your objective. The topic may be a specific vocabulary grouping, verbs, adjectives, cultural topics or something as general as a review at the beginning or end of the year.

4. Collect their list of analogies for assessment to make sure they have set up the analogies correctly and accurately.

5. The following day, return their checked analogies. Each group or individual prepares an overhead transparency. At completion, you will be able to do the final assessment. (See Assessments)

6. Use their lists to review the vocabulary with the rest of the class or other classes. This review may be directed by the teacher or a student representative from each group.

Assessments

1. The evidence of the formative assessment would be the initial list of analogies that each student or small group creates. Check the following criteria:
a. The analogies are written in the correct format.
b. The analogies show a correct relationship between the words.
c. Vocabulary is correctly written in the target language.

2. Additional evidence of the assessment would be the final list of analogies that each student or group has prepared on an overhead transparency. Check the following criteria:
a. The analogies are written in the correct format.
b. The analogies show a correct relationship between the words.
c. Vocabulary is correctly written in the target language.

Extensions

1. Helpful hint: Do not write the answers directly on your original overhead or the student-made overheads. Place a blank overhead on top. This avoids having to wipe out the answers if and when you want to use them again...that could be quite a mess!
2. Another option would be to have students type their list from the computer. Instruct them to use a bold, heavy print. Then, you can make an overhead on your copy machine which enables you to write directly on them and they will keep much longer.
3. At the beginning or end of the year, this is a great review activity. You could have your level 3 classes create them at the beginning of the school year, then use them at the end of the year to review with your level 2 classes. (Or level 2 create for level 1, etc.)
4. With more advanced knowledge of vocabulary, upper level students could use their vocabulary from their English classes.
5. Students could create their analogies using information learned in other classes such as science, social studies, health or even electives such as band or art. (See Associated File)

Web Links

Web supplement for Analogies in Foreign Language Classes
Analogies

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