Beacon Lesson Plan Library

What Do You Mean I Can't Read That?

Rebecca Endrelunas

Description

Students examine well-known book titles that have been banned in the last fifty years, select and read one with a partner and decide whether the book should be retained or banned.

Objectives

The student knows that people respond differently to texts based on their background knowledge, purpose, and point of view.

Materials

-Whole-class Internet computer access for two 90-minute classes
-Articles on book censorship or banned books (See Preparations)
-Censorship of Literature Debate Rubric (See Associated File)

Preparations

1. Arrange library/computer access time.
2. Locate and print article(s) on book censorship/banned books such as:
“Harry Potter Again Most Challenged.” [American Libraries]. Mar. 2002:v33 v33 p12(1).
Will Manley. “In Defense of Book Burning.” [American Libraries]. Mar. 2002:v33 i3 p196(1). (See Weblinks)
3. Group students in pairs.
4. Copy Censorship of Literature Debate Rubric for students. (See Associated File)

Procedures

Note: This lesson requires the reading of controversial materials. Make sure students and parents are aware of the lesson objective and materials used prior to beginning.

DAY 1 (Introduction in Library)
1. Students read article on censorship/banned books. (See Preparations) Students and teacher discuss what merits a good book, i.e., accuracy, clarity, interest, plot, character development, timeliness, organization, setting, style, and personal preferences of the reader. Students and teacher discuss issues of censorship, various reasons that literature is censored and why individuals or groups may attempt to impose restrictions and access. Discuss the fact that people respond differently to text information based on their background knowledge, purpose, and point of view.

2. Students access Internet sites on banned books and literary censorship. (See Weblinks)

3. Students, in pairs, select and read one identified title.

4. Observation and interview by the teacher is needed to assure that students are on task and making progress.

DAY 2-DAY 5 (Non-class Time)
5.Students read selected literature.

DAY 6 (Library Research)
6. Students, in pairs, discuss their opinions of the book they have just read.

7. Students conduct Internet research to find pro and con positions on the book.

8. Students, together, prepare a presentation of the book to the class using personal opinions and information from their research offering both sides of the issue. (Distribute the Censorship of Literature Debate Rubric to the students prior to their preparation so they know what is expected in their presentations. See Associated File)

9. Observation and interview by the teacher is needed to assure that students are on task and making progress. Use the Censorship of Literature Debate Rubric to provide formative feedback to the students during the observations and interviews.

DAY 7 (Library Presentation)
10. Students present their book to the class.

11. The teacher evaluates the presentation using the Censorship of Literature Debate Rubric. (See Associated File)

Assessments

Evidence:
-Teacher observation and interview during discussion and group research assures that students understand and are actively engaged.
-Students present the rationale for retaining or banning selected piece of literature and exhibit knowledge that people respond differently to text based on their background knowledge, purpose, and point of view.

Criteria:
-Students present the opposing views of a selected banned title, each citing at least 3 specific examples from the literature paired with clear and well-developed specific criteria to support their positions.
-Student performance evaluated by Censorship of Literature Debate Rubric. (See Associated File)

Extensions

Students select books according to interests and abilities.

Web Links

Web supplement for What Do You Mean I Can’t Read That?
Banned Books On-Line

Web supplement for What Do You Mean I Can’t Read That?
Banned Books Week

Web supplement for What Do You Mean I Can’t Read That?
Banned Books and Censorship: Information and Resources

Web supplement for What Do You Mean I Can’t Read That?
Banned Books and Censorship

Attached Files

This file contains the Censorship of Literature Debate Rubric.     File Extension: pdf

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