Beacon Lesson Plan Library

The Three Bad Little Pigs

Fernando Arencibia Jr

Description

Historical analysis involves the discovery and interpretation of evidence to evaluate an event in time. This lesson introduces students to conflicting primary sources and provides them with a framework to assist in their interpretations.

Objectives

The student evaluates conflicting sources and materials in the interpretation of a historical event or episode.

Materials

-The Three Little Pigs by James Marshall*
-The True Story of the 3 Little Pigs by Jon Scieszka, Lane Smith (Illustrator).*
-Primary Sources Guide
-Primary Sources Worksheet
-Assessment Prompt
-Assessment Rubric

*one copy for half of the students in the class

Preparations

1. Read The Three Little Pigs by James Marshall and The True Story of the 3 Little Pigs by Jon Scieszka, Lane Smith (Illustrator).
2. Review the Primary Source Guide.
3. Complete a Primary Source Worksheet to familiarize yourself with the process.
4. Make sure you have sufficient copies of the stories and the handouts.

Procedures

1. Ask the students to write an outline of the story of -The Three Little Pigs- as they best remember it.

2. Guide a brainstorm session and organize the students' feedback regarding the story, into a graphic organizer on an overhead projector, blackboard, or whiteboard.

3. Congratulate the students on their recollection and inform them that they will now read a story of -The Three Little Pigs- to fill any missing gaps.

4. Separate the class into two halves.

5. Give one-half of the class The Three Little Pigs by James Marshall. Ask them to read it silently and write an outline of their story. Do not reveal that each group is receiving a different story.

6. Give the other half of the class The True Story of the 3 Little Pigs by Jon Scieszka, Lane Smith (Illustrator), A. Wolf. Ask them to read it silently and write an outline of their story. Do not reveal that each group is receiving a different story.

7. Upon completion of the silent reading activity, guide another brainstorming session regarding the story. Due to the fact that each half has a conflicting story, lead a discussion comparing the facts of each story. You may want to conduct your lesson using a graphic organizer such as a Venn Diagram (see associated file) as a visual for comparing and contrasting each story.

8. Tell the students that they were presented with conflicting stories. Explain that as historians it is their job to evaluate the credibility of each story. At this point the teacher should encourage students to share real life examples of times when they have heard conflictive stories of the same event. (For example: A questionable foul called during a football game changes the outcome of the game. How would you know if the referee made a mistake? Who would give you the right answer? What would the winning team say? What would the loosing team say? What would the fans say? What would the referee say? (To make a decision about the refereeís action you must look for the most credible source, or the most credible, common thread in all the stories)

9. Introduce and explain (step by step) the Primary Source Guide (see associated file).

10. Hand out two Primary Source Worksheets (see associated file) per student.

11. Model the completion of a Primary Source Worksheet based on The Three Little Pigs by James Marshall. Ask for student input as they complete one of their Primary Source Worksheets with you.

12. Read out loud The True Story of the 3 Little Pigs by Jon Scieszka, Lane Smith (Illustrator), to ascertain that the entire class is on the same page.

13. In pairs, ask the students to complete a Primary Source Worksheet based on The True Story of the 3 Little Pigs by Jon Scieszka, Lane Smith (Illustrator), A. Wolf. It is suggested that the teacher pair one student that previously read the book and one student that read the original story.

14. Upon completion, organize the class into groups of 4 to 6 students. Ask the students to review each otherís Primary Source Worksheet and to make any corrections necessary.

15. Using studentís contribution, fill in a Primary Source Worksheet on an overhead projector.

16. Begin a class discussion about the credibility of each story. Tell the students, ďAfter an in-depth analysis of each story it is your job as a historian determine the credibility of each of these sources.-

17. Ask the students to write their comparative essay on the Assessment Prompt sheet (see associated file). Go over the Assessment Rubric (see associated file) prior to the writing of the essay. They can use their completed Primary Source Worksheets to help them write their essays.

Assessments

Assessment of this lesson will take the form of an essay comparing both books. The following are the evidence and criteria for the essay. Give students the Assessment Prompt and Assessment Rubric (see associated file). Students should be allowed to use their Primary Source Worksheets to assist them in writing the essay.

Evidence:

Write a comparative essay answering the following question: Analyze the credibility of The Three Little Pigs by James Marshall, in relation to The True Story of the 3 Little Pigs by Jon Scieszka, Lane Smith (Illustrator),

A. Wolf based on the source of the documents and the authorís points of view. Based on your analysis, which story do you believe to be true?

Criteria:

The student will be able to write a comparative essay which:

1. Has a relevant thesis and supports that thesis with evidence from the documents.

†††a. Addresses comparison of the issues or themes specified.

2. Analyzes the documents in as many appropriate ways as possible.

†††a. Provides a minimum of three supporting details that correspond to each point of view (story)

3. Takes into account both the sources of the documents and the authorsí points of view.

4. Makes at least one or two relevant, direct comparisons between the stories.

Extensions

This lesson involves the practice of a skill. It is a good segue way to analyzing historical primary sources. If you implement this lesson at the beginning of the school year and repeat the process throughout the year using various historical documents, the students will achieve mastery of this skill.
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