Beacon Lesson Plan Library

From Pirates to Pilots to Spies

Mark Peugh

Description

Students enjoy this introduction to the world of map projections, globes, aerial photographs, and satellite images. This lesson instructs the students on the advantages and disadvantages of each earthly representation.

Objectives

The student knows various map forms and other geographic representations. (for example, maps, globes, aerial photographs, satellite-produced images).

Materials

-Globe
-Aerial Photograph(s)
-Satellite image (see Weblinks)
-Map projection Atlas
-Four Column Chart (see associated file)

Preparations

1. Arrange access to map projections, globe, aerial photographs, and satellite images.
2. Download associated file and make copies of four-column assessment sheet.

Procedures

1. Ask: “Ahoy Matte,” have you ever wondered how pirates navigated the high seas, or airplanes take off in Miami and land in London, England? What about how the military gathers intelligence information on its enemies. This is done through the use of maps, globes, aerial photographs, and satellite images.

2. Ask the students if they know differences of map projections, globes, aerial photographs, and satellite images.

3. Ask the students what the purpose of maps, globes, and aerial photos/satellite images are.

4. Ask the students when they might use each of the different earthly representations. For instance, would you use a globe to get from Miami to Orlando?

5. Encourage the students to respond to the questions and take notes on the discussion.

6. Introduce and discuss the five top map projections, (Mercator, Robinson, Equal-area, Interrupted, and Peters) one at a time and explain to the students the advantages and disadvantage of each. The students should take notes on the discussion.

7. Ask the students to write down on their own paper any differences they see in the five map projections.

8. Introduce the aerial photo and the satellite images. Ask the students when a geographer would use an aerial photograph or satellite image. Discuss the advantages and disadvantages.

9. Ask the students to write down the differences they see between the map projections and the aerial photos and satellite images.

10. Introduce the students to a globe. Ask the students if they would use a globe as a navigational tool to travel from Miami to Orlando. Discuss the advantages and disadvantages.

11. Ask the students to write down any characteristics they see among the map projections, aerial photos/satellite images, and the globe.

12. Pass out the four-column chart for the students to write down the advantages and disadvantages of each representation (see associated file).

13. Students will write in the description column when they would use each. (See associated file)

Assessments

Assess students by looking at the four-column chart listing the advantages and disadvantages of each map form, globe, aerial photographs, and satellite images used for determining geographic representation (see associated file). The students should provide a minimum of two advantages and disadvantages for each of the map forms presented by teacher. In addition, the students will evaluate the proper usage.

Web Links

Web supplement for From Pirates to Pilots to Spies
Earth Observatory

Web supplement for From Pirates to Pilots to Spies
Astronomy Picture of the Day

Attached Files

A four-column chart for listing advantages and disadvantages.     File Extension: pdf

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