Beacon Lesson Plan Library

Dream Killers

Dawn Capes
Bay District Schools

Description

What is a dream killer? A person? An idea? Students continue their exploration of figurative language and point of view in the novel, [Jacob Have I Loved].

Objectives

The student incorporates audiovisual aids in presentations.

The student recognizes complex elements of plot, including setting, character development, conflicts, and resolutions.

The student understands various elements of authors' craft appropriate at this grade level, including word choice, symbolism, figurative language, mood, irony, foreshadowing, flashback, persuasion techniques, and point of view in both fiction and nonfiction.

Materials

-Band Together handout (One per student)
-Chart paper and markers (One per group)
-Classroom set of the book [Jacob Have I Loved] (Katherine Paterson. Harper Trophy. ISBN 0-06-440368-8)
-Student folders (Created during Day 1 of the unit)
-Exit slips for each day (Unit handout, Content Questions)
-Symbolism transparencies (see Associated File)
-Bulletin board or table with visual aides (see Associated File)

Preparations

1. Create or use your own methods for group procedures. Procedures should include jobs, behavioral expectations, etc.

2. Review answer keys in order to be aware of how students should be updating their handouts.

3. Decide if Exit Slips will be used. If so, use the Unit Plan handout, Content Questions. Remember, these are not for a grade, but to assess student understanding of the novel.

4. Create transparencies for Journal Entries 3, 4, and 5 and the symbolism pages.

5. Decide which reading strategies you will use with your students. All students can benefit from reading strategies.

6. Involve your social studies or science teacher! Use the complementary science and social studies units and make it an integrated approach!
**The science unit, entitled Twin Traits, explores the idea of twins and if they are more impacted by their environment or by their genetics. Students learn about twins that have been separated at birth and how alike and unalike they are.
**The social studies unit, World War II, explores background information of World War II and how it impacted America. Students create radio broadcasts simulating the way many people received their information during this time period.
**A discussion guide is provided in the Unit Plan's Associated Files.

7. This lesson is a part of a larger unit entitled, [Jacob Have I Loved]- A Novel Study. The handouts for the unit, including assessments, discussion guides, and answer keys, can be found on the Beacon site.

8. Update the bulletin board or table with the new visual aide ideas located in the Associated File.

Procedures

Day 7 of the unit, [Jacob Have I Loved]
1. Review content to date of the novel and literary techniques (mood, figurative language, setting, characterization, foreshadowing, flashback and the use of audiovisual aids). Especially review Chapter 6 since it was homework reading.

(Optional- Use the new visual display to spark a discussion with students. What could the cat in the bag mean? What could the bottle of medicine imply? What about the Jergen's lotion?)

2. Teach the concept of symbolism. (Use transparencies of the handouts for symbolism that are available in the Associated File.)
A. Start small explaining that there are symbols all around us. Use the transparency of Symbols in our daily lives. Show one symbol at a time asking students what they mean.
B. Next, use the transparency of How can we know if an author is using symbolism? Discuss each bulleted item.
C. Finally, go over the Examples of Symbolism. Bring in other examples if needed.

3. Explain that students will be working in discussion groups and sharing their answers. Go over proper group procedures. It is suggested that they choose one person to chart their results and one person to report out. Then, allow students to move to their groups. Give group assignments, from the handout, Band Together, and have students begin. As students are working, walk around and assess each group’s work. Be sure that students are filling out their sheets appropriately. Use the key for assistance.

4. Once students finish, have them take out their journals and explain that they will be taking notes on what they and other groups discovered.

(Be sure to bring to student's attention a review of why the novel has elicited a wide variety of responses from people. Discuss.)

5. As groups present, allow time for discussion and provide formative feedback that is guiding and clear. An answer key for questions is provided in the attached files.

6. After groups finish presenting, students begin reading Chapter 7.

7. (OPTIONAL) Exit Slips for Chapter 6. (See Extensions for more information.)

Day 8
1. Students finish reading chapter 7 and continue reading into chapters 8 and 9. (It is suggested that teacher led readings and usage of better oral readers be used to expedite the reading. Also, consider using Radio Reading.)

2. Update character, setting, and conflict/resolution sheets. As students are working, walk around and individually formatively assess each student’s work. Be sure that students are filling out their sheets appropriately. Use the key for assistance. Students who are continually struggling may need more instruction in identifying character traits and settings.

3. Ask if there have been any resolutions? Any characters who’ve changed? Any new settings? Use the answer key for the handouts to guide student responses.

4. Point out the following quotes and discuss-
Page 92- “Haze was so thick, it was like trying to inhale wet cotton.” (Figurative language)
Page 95- “August and February are both alike in one way. They’re both dream killers." (Word Choice)
Page 99- “Relief washed over me like gentle surf.” (Figurative language)
Be sure to ask students how they could incorporate an audiovisual aid in order to demonstrate these examples of figurative language. Be sure to remember sound [and] music.

5. Students will write in their journals. (Use transparency of Journal Entries #3 for Chapter 8 and 9)

6. (OPTIONAL) Exit slips for Chapters 7-9.

Day 9
1. Read Chapters 10-11. (Again, try to integrate reading strategies suitable for your students.)

2. As few activities are planned for this day, spend additional time reviewing basic content questions and have students update their character, setting and conflict/resolution sheets. As students are working, walk around and individually assess each student’s work. Be sure that students are filling out their sheets appropriately. Use the key for assistance. Students who are continually struggling may need more instruction in identifying character traits and settings.

3. Review point of view. Other than Sara Louise, who else's point of view would they like to see the story told from? What would happen if we switched the story’s point of view? How would the story change?

4. Allow students an opportunity to share.

5. Then, ask if there are any examples of foreshadowing. See if any students bring up any examples reflecting Call and Caroline's interest in each other.

6. Then, have student’s journal their responses. Use the transparency for Journal Entries #4 for Chapter 11.

7. (OPTIONAL) Exit Slips for Chapters 10-11. (See Extensions for more information.)

Interesting note: Sara Louise is named after the Grandmother. (See page 124) How do you think this makes Sara Louise feel to be named after a woman that appears to hate her so? Shouldn’t the grandmother love her namesake?

Day 10
1. Students read chapters 12-13 and update character, setting and conflict/resolution sheets.

2. Discuss the grandmother. Students should have some definite opinions about her behavior and what they think is causing it. Has she changed? Ask students what is happening to her? Will her senility cause more conflict or more resolutions?

3. Possible content questions: Are Sara Louise’s comments about Caroline and Call’s hands true? Allow students an opportunity to discuss. Why did Sara Louise go so crazy about the Jergen’s lotion? Is she justified? Is this another instance where Sara Louise hates her sister?

4. Have students do Journal entry #5 for chapters 12-13. (Use a transparency of the entry which is available in the attached files.)

5. Collect student folders for formative assessment

Assessments

Informal formative assessment occurs during each day as students are working on their character, setting and conflict sheets. Use the answer keys for guidance.

Formal, ungraded, formative assessment occurs when folders are collected on day 10. Journal entries and handouts are formatively assessed. Use answer keys for guidance.

Extensions

Note- This is written for grades 6-8; however, it should be noted that 6th and 7th graders may need additional assistance with some of the terminology and activities such as figurative language, word choice, etc. Use student textbooks or a book such as [Reader's Handbook: A Student Guide for Reading and Learning]. Great Source Education Group a Houghton Mifflin Company. 2002.
This book can be very helpful in providing definitions, practice, and examples of the literary terms in this unit.


1. ESOL students can be paired with a reading buddy, have a version of the novel in their native language (if available), an audio tape of the novel (this can be created by the teacher), and additional reading time.

2. Depending on the needs of your students, you may need to implement reading strategies to ensure students comprehend the content of the novel. You are the best judge of what will be best for your students. The site Just Read Now at www.justreadnow.com has a plethora of reading strategies. Go to Reading Strategies and Active Reading Strategies.)

3. Instead of using the handouts in the attached file, note the necessary information and have students write on their own notebook paper.

4. Involve your social studies or science teacher! Use the complementary science and social studies units and make it an integrated approach! The science unit, entitled Twin Traits, explores the idea of twins and if they are more impacted by their environment or by their genetics. Students learn about twins that have been separated at birth and how alike and unalike they are. The social studies unit, World War II, explores background information of World War II and how it impacted America. Students create radio broadcasts simulating the way many people received their information during this time period. (Discussion Questions are available in the unit's associated files.)

5. The Beacon Unit Plan associated with this lesson can be viewed by clicking on the link located at the top of this page or going to: http://www.beaconlearningcenter.com/search/details.asp?item=3001. Once you select the unit’s link, scroll to the bottom of the unit plan page to find the section, Associated File. This section contains links to the Unit Plan Overview, Diagnostic and Summative Assessments, and other associated files, (if any).

6. It may be helpful to give students a target as they are reading. Write the exit slip and journal entry questions on the overhead or white board before students enter the room.

Web Links

Web supplement for Dream Killers
Just Read Now

Use this link to reach the unit that can be integrated with Jacob Have I Loved- A Novel study.
Announcing World War II

Use this link to reach the science unit that can be integrated with Jacob Have I Loved- A Novel study.
Twin Traits

Attached Files

Visuals for lesson three     File Extension: pdf

Handouts for lesson three     File Extension: pdf

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