Beacon Lesson Plan Library

Geo Jammin' By Design - Day 1, Lesson 6: Quilt Story

Katie Koehnemann
Bay District Schools

Description

Through literature, discussion, and response to critical thinking questions, students recognize the use of geometric components in quilts, and that quilts are an artistic form that reflect the cultural heritage of the people who design them.

Objectives

The student knows congruent shapes.

The student identifies shapes that can be combined or separated (for example, a rectangle can be separated into two triangles).

The student predicts the reflection of a given two-dimensional shape.

The student identifies and demonstrates slides, flips, and turns of simple figures using concrete materials.

The student identifies patterns in the real-world (for example, repeating, rotational, tessellating, and patchwork).

The student knows some works of art that reflect the cultural heritage of the community or country (for example, paintings, statues).

The student knows ways people can conserve and replenish natural resources.

Materials

-[The Quilt Story] by Tony Johnston and Tomie dePaola
-A transparency copy of the quilt in the story. This is located on the page facing the title page in the book.
-Copy of De’scussion by De’sign (A list of sample guiding questions, geometric and social studies concepts to formatively assess, and concepts to be addressed in the story.) (See Associated File)
-Thought question written on sentence strip: Is a quilt a work of art that represents the cultural heritage of the country/community where it is made?
-(OPTIONAL) A real quilt
-A place children can gather together to sit on the floor to hear the story and view the quilt
-(OPTIONAL) Period music of long ago (This sounds general and not real specific, but the idea is not for a particular time period, but more for establishing the idea that quilting has been around for hundreds of years. Ask the music teacher for guidance on this one, and lean to colonial America if possible.)
-Marker for adding words to the Word Board

Preparations

1) Obtain a copy of the book [The Quilt Story] by Tony Johnston and Tomie dePaola.
2) Familiarize yourself with the story.
3) Print a copy of De’scussion by De’Sign. (See Associated File)
4) Ready other questions (analysis and synthesis) that you will want to ask students to lead them into some critical thinking about quilts and cultural heritage.
5) Make a transparency of the quilt in the story. (This is located on the page facing the title page in the book)
6) Obtain a real quilt for students to experience. (Optional, but the real thing is always best. An antique one would be best of all.)
7) Have a location where students can sit together on the floor to hear the story.
8) Have period music available. (See note in Materials list)
9) Write the evaluation question on sentence strip.

Procedures

1) (If using music: Begin to play period music allowing students to listen for a short time.) As the music is playing, gather children around on the floor in a group.

2) With the music playing softly in the background, introduce the book, [The Quilt Story]. Hold up the book and talk about the cover and title. Guide students to make predictions about the story. Draw attention to the bed cover in the picture.

3) Place on the overhead projector the transparency of the quilt in the story. Direct students’ thinking with guiding questions. (See Associated File)

4) Formative assessment occurs as students respond to the questions. Give positive and corrective feedback as students discuss geometric and social studies concepts. (See Associated File)

5) Bring forth the real quilt for students to exam.

6) Introduce cultural (that which has to do with the set of shared attitudes, values, goals, practices or way of doing things, and beliefs of a group of people.)
Add it to the Word Board.

7) Introduce heritage (something we get from someone that came before us; like a tradition; a handing down of information, beliefs, and customs by word of mouth or by example from one generation to another without written instruction.)
Add it to the Word Board.

8) Post the thought question:
Is a quilt a work of art that represents the cultural heritage of the country/community where it is made?
Direct students to listen to the story and make a personal evaluation of the quilt with regard to this question.

9) Begin reading the story, discussing the pictures and text for ideas that support the intent of this lesson. (See Associated File)

10) Ask students to share their ideas about the thought question. Formative assessment occurs as students suggest that quilts are handed down from generation to generation teaching the values, customs, beliefs and way of doing things through the pictures and sewing techniques that are included. Lead students to understand that quilts are works of art that show the cultural heritage of the people who made them.

Assessments

Formative assessments occurs as students discuss and share ideas with regard to the geometric components and patterns of the quilt and the cultural heritage significance of quilts as they are made as an art form and handed down generation to generation. Positive and corrective feedback is given through direct response (Yes, you are correct, there are dove shapes on the quilt.) and through critical thinking skills by the students in response to both analysis questions (Looking at the doves, what transformation feature did the artist use? (Flip the dove from the front.) Is that a horizontal or vertical flip? (Horizontal) and synthesis questions (With the person next to you discuss and predict what the dove design would look like if the artist did a horizontal flip of the dove from the tail? A vertical flip from the top? Vertical flip from the bottom?).

Extensions

1) This is Lesson 6 – Quilt Story; a social studies lesson
Lessons 1 – 6 are for Day 1 of the unit Geo Jammin’ By DeSign
Lessons 7 – 11 are for Day 2 of the unit Geo Jammin’ By DeSign
Lessons 12 – 17 are for Day 3 of the unit Geo Jammin’ By DeSign
Lessons 18 – 23 are for Day 4 of the unit Geo Jammin’ By DeSign
Lessons 24 – 28 are for Day 5 of the unit Geo Jammin’ By DeSign
Lessons 29 – 32 are for Day 6 of the unit Geo Jammin’ By DeSign.
Lessons 33 – 38 are for Day 7 of the unit Geo Jammin’ By DeSign

Lessons may reflect modifications of, but are designed in conjunction with the Reading
Framework approach to classroom instruction and may be adapted to the Four Block
Classroom.
2) The Beacon Unit Plan associated with this lesson can be viewed by clicking on the link located at the top of this page or by using the following URL: http://www.beaconlearningcenter.com/search/details.asp?item=3004. Once you select the unit’s link, scroll to the bottom of the unit plan page to find the section, Associated Files. This section contains links to the Unit Plan Overview, Diagnostic and Summative Assessments, and other associated files (if any).
3) As a learning center activity, have a real quilt on display. Students visit the center to write about what they see when they look at the quilt. This is a free write exercise where students may choose to write about the geometric values involved, the cultural heritage aspect of the design, or both. Formative assessment occurs as you read what children have written and make note of their understanding of math and social studies concepts.

Attached Files

Support Material     File Extension: pdf

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