Beacon Lesson Plan Library

Geo Jammin' By Design - Day 2, Lesson 10: Wanna Trade?

Katie Koehnemann
Bay District Schools

Description

Through critical thinking questions, students develop an understanding of the way trade helps meet the basic needs of people, ways people can conserve and replenish their resources, and that quilts are an art form that reflect our cultural heritage.

Objectives

The student knows some works of art that reflect the cultural heritage of the community or country (for example, paintings, statues).

The student knows ways trade helps families in different places meet their basic needs of clothing, food, and shelter.

The student knows ways people can conserve and replenish natural resources.

Materials

-Copy of the book [Ox-Cart Man] by Donald Hall (ISBN 0-14-050441-9)
-Location for children to gather for purposeful listening
-A chart titled Listening With Purpose, OX-CART MAN. Under the title, divide the chart paper in half by drawing a vertical line down the middle. Write at the top of one side the heading ‘What Can We Trade?’ Write ‘What Are Our Needs?’ as the heading for the other side. (See teachable moment in Preparations)

Preparations

1) Get a copy of the book [Ox-Cart Man] by Donald Hall. (ISBN 0-14-050441-9)
2) Know where you want the children to sit for the story and following discussion.
3) Prepare a large chart page. Title it Listening With Purpose. Under the title, divide the chart paper in half by drawing a vertical line down the middle. Write at the top of one column the heading ‘What Can We Trade?’ Write ‘What Are Our Needs?’ as the heading for the other column.
(Teachable moment here! Have the title written ahead of time. Tell students the chart must be divided in half vertically. Either have them tell you what to do, or call on a student to draw the vertical line on the chart for you. Add the headings before reading the story.)

Procedures

1) Gather students to the listening area. Facilitate a discussion to review things learned about quilting and cultural heritage from the book, [Quilt Story] (Lesson 6, Quilt Story).

2) Students discuss ideas that come to mind when they think of the term ‘trade’. Challenge: As they listen to the story [Ox-Cart Man], ask them to listen for how people trade things they make for things they need.

3) Before beginning, hang the chart (See teachable moment in Preparation) to remind students of what to listen for.

4) Read the story.

5) Facilitate a discussion.
Chart student ideas of what they learned from the story as to the kinds of things that people trade. Direct the discussion with guiding and critical thinking questions. Make a clear case for the concept that what people had available to trade was in direct relation to how hard they worked. (i.e. planting and harvesting potatoes, raising oxen, building carts, raising and shearing sheep, knitting, sewing, candle making, splitting shingles, etc.) In other words, quilting was a labor-intensive activity.

6) Facilitate a discussion.
Chart student ideas with regards to things they learned from the story that people need. Make sure comments include the necessities of food, shelter, and clothing. Direct the discussion with guiding and critical thinking questions. In the story the man traded for money so he could buy what he needed. Lead students to understand that sometimes people would trade one product for another. Have them brainstorm other things (besides the three named in the story) that families needed and had to trade for. (Food, clothing, shelter)

7) Formative assessment occurs as you listen to student responses that reflect their developing understanding of basic needs. (Clothing, food, shelter, and in this case, supplies for making more products to trade).

8) Extension of ideas: include the making of quilts for trade.
For example: Ask: How can this discussion apply to quilts and what does studying old quilts tell us about the people of long ago?
Present this scenario: I want to make a quilt to trade/sell. I need thread, needles, and fabric. I have enough money to buy the needle and thread, but not enough to buy any new fabric. Should I think of something else to trade? (No, make the quilt. See reasoning below.)
Formative assessment occurs as you listen to student responses.
Connections should be made to:
A. Use of fabric scraps for quilts; conserving odd scraps of fabric replenished the basic need of having quilts for warmth, therefore, you could surely make a quilt if all you could afford is the thread and needle. The fabric comes from scraps you already have. (Conservation of resources)
B. Quilts were a good trade item. Everyone needed them because they met a basic need. (Clothing or shelter)
C. Quilts of old teach us about the cultural heritage of the time. By studying them we learn about the types of designs, fabrics, stitching, and materials that were popular and available in that time in history. Through the art of quilting, cultural heritage is preserved.

9) Complete discussion. Have students to return to their seats.

Assessments

Formative assessment occurs as students respond to guiding and critical thinking questions that lead them to first understand the basics of the story and then to connect that knowledge to the cultural heritage and trade value of quilts. (Specific guidance located in Procedures.)

Extensions

1) This is Lesson 10 – Wanna Trade; Component – Read Aloud
Lessons 1 – 6 are for Day 1 of the unit Geo Jammin’ By DeSign
Lessons 7 – 11 are for Day 2 of the unit Geo Jammin’ By DeSign
Lessons 12 – 17 are for Day 3 of the unit Geo Jammin’ By DeSign
Lessons 18 – 23 are for Day 4 of the unit Geo Jammin’ By DeSign
Lessons 24 – 28 are for Day 5 of the unit Geo Jammin’ By DeSign
Lessons 29 – 32 are for Day 6 of the unit Geo Jammin’ By DeSign.
Lessons 33 – 38 are for Day 7 of the unit Geo Jammin’ By DeSign

Lessons may reflect modifications of, but are designed in conjunction with the Reading Framework approach to classroom instruction and may be adapted to the Four Block Classroom.
2) The Beacon Unit Plan associated with this lesson can be viewed by clicking on the link located at the top of this page or by using the following URL: http://www.beaconlearningcenter.com/search/details.asp?item=3004. Once you select the unit’s link, scroll to the bottom of the unit plan page to find the section, Associated Files. This section contains links to the Unit Plan Overview, Diagnostic and Summative Assessments, and other associated files (if any).
Return to the Beacon Lesson Plan Library.