Beacon Lesson Plan Library

Geo Jammin' By Design - Day 3, Lesson 14: Mirror, Mirror on the Wall

Katie Koehnemann
Bay District Schools

Description

Led in exploration by accepting statements and probing questions, students work in small groups with mirrors to discover and identify the characteristics of symmetry, with the intent to write a description of symmetry and to locate the line of symmetry.

Objectives

The student describes symmetry in two-dimensional shapes.

The student determines lines of symmetry of two-dimensional shapes by using concrete materials.

The student knows congruent shapes.

The student predicts the reflection of a given two-dimensional shape.

Materials

-Procedure for arranging students into small groups (Three or four students per group)
-3 ½ x 3 ½ inch square by 1/8 inch thick mirror for each child (See Teacher Preparation)
-Copy of Group Recorder De’scoveries work page for each group recorder
-Copy of De’scovery Pictures Page for each child (In Associated File) (Give 1/3 of the groups the cartoon frog page, 1/3 the black silhouette frog page, and 1/3 the rabbit page. Each person in a group will have the same picture page, but groups will have different picture pages.)
-Transparency copy of: Mirror, Mirror on the Wall, What Does Symmetry Mean to Us All? (In Associated File)
-Transparency copy of each of the De’scovery Picture Pages (In Associated File)
-Overhead projector with viewing surface
-Pencil for each child
-Line of Symmetry chart from Lesson 13, Reflections
-Computer with large screen monitor (television)
-Ask Hannah, a Student Web Lesson created by Julie Thompson, book marked on the computer (See Weblinks and Extensions)

Preparations

1) Go to a local glass and mirror company to get the mirrors. Ask to have the corners rounded for safety. Many times the glass company will provide these small individual mirrors at no cost because (1) they can make them out of scraps they have laying around and (2) they can be considered a donation for education. If not, buy them. They are not expensive and you will use them for years to come.
2) For each recorder, print a copy of Thoughts and Ideas About What We De’scovered. (See Associated File)
3) For each student, print a copy of:
One of the De’scovery Pictures page. (See note in Materials section)
Literacy Link Mirror, Mirror. (See Associated File)
4) Make a transparency copy of:
Mirror, Mirror on the Wall What Does Symmetry Mean to Us All? (See Associated File)
One each of the three different De’scovery Pictures pages. (See Associated File)
5) Ready an overhead projector with viewing surface.
6) Pencil for every student.
7) Computer hooked up to a large screen monitor (television).
8) Ask Hannah, Student Web Lesson, book marked and ready for viewing.
9) Decide to use Option I or II.
10) Complete the Student Web Lesson, Ask Hannah, to be familiar with the contents.

Procedures

NOTE: Students are in small groups of three or four. (See Lesson 13, Reflections)
OPTION I:
1) Direct student groups to choose a recorder for their group.

2) Establish safety rules for using the mirrors with students.

3) Hand out to each group recorder a copy of Group Recorder: De’scoveries About Symmetry. (In Associated File) Explain recorder responsibilities: After the team has explored symmetry and participants have recorded their findings on the De’scovery Pictures page (In Associated File), the recorder notes the groups’ discoveries, observations or what they ‘uncovered’ about symmetry. At the bottom of the page record the different strategies group members used to uncover the characteristics they found. (For example: holding the mirror on edge and tilting it different ways, holding the mirror flat and above the pictures, etc.)

4) Place in the center of each group: mirrors and a De’scovery Pictures page (Each person in a group will have the same picture page, but groups will have different picture pages.)

5) Place Mirror, Mirror on the Wall, What Does Symmetry Mean to Us All?, transparency on the overhead. Read and present students with the ‘Challenge.’ Read Steps to Follow. Clarify what students are to do:
(Steps # 1 – 3 are self explanatory; Step # 4 pertains to the ideas listed on the chart from lesson 13, Reflections, as well as any others displayed in the room, Step #5 is what each child is to do on their De’scovery Pictures page next to the two different angles of the same object, Steps # 6 - 8 are what the recorder does with participant input after all exploratory activities are complete.) Students begin exploratory work in their small groups.

6) Formative assessment occurs as groups are monitored during their investigation and exploration to uncover the characteristics of symmetry. Ideas to be discovered are things such as: symmetry is when both halves of a design are the exact opposite; they are the mirror image of the other; everything on one half is in the exact same place on the other half; if a design or picture is folded in half, and both halves meet and match exactly, they are symmetrical; that a symmetrical picture has two congruent halves, etc.

7) This is a problem-based learning type activity. It is especially challenging for classrooms unaccustomed to taking risks, trial and error activities, and out of the box creative problem solving. Symptoms of this may be restlessness, unwillingness to risk putting anything on the paper, or not knowing how to work together in an experimenting situation. Do not be discouraged. This is learning in many ways. Move from group to group. Give reassurance and encourage students to really talk things over with each other. Ask how and why questions to tap higher order thinking. Students learn through discovery, rather than direct instruction. Research shows ‘uncoverage’ to be a strong learning strategy. Be patient. It takes practice to turn research into classroom routine.
8) Monitor and guide students with accepting statements and probing questions to lead them to investigate thoughts and ideas further.
For example: You observe that as a student explores the side view of the frog, they have sited it as an example of symmetry because they can see the exact same image in the mirror. Your response may be, “You are doing a good job of using the mirror and it looks like you are holding it at the middle of the frog. What can you say about the whole picture made by the paper and the reflected image? What is the image in the picture equal to? Is the whole of what you are seeing (the paper image plus the mirror image) equal to the whole paper image?
OR
You observe a group holding a mirror up to the front view of a frog but it is misaligned so that there is more to the symmetrical image than there should be, making it wider. Your response may be, “I see you are on the right track. But I would sure hate to be on a diet and have you check to see if I was symmetrical!”

9) Once all group work is complete facilitate a class discussion about symmetry to determine a definition of symmetry and line of symmetry. Begin by allowing each group to share their findings. Using the appropriate group transparency, draw the line of symmetry on each picture and record ideas shared by students.

10) Direct students’ attention to the large monitor. To check students’ definitions, guide the class through the pages of Ask Hannah, an interactive Student Web Lesson, which explores symmetry. The lesson is a perfect match for re-teaching, reviewing, and practicing what students learned about symmetry.
Tip: Set up a computer station where students can experience Ask Hannah at various, appropriate times of the day. Participating affords students the opportunity to review, practice, and learn what symmetry is. Have this interactive lesson available to students throughout the duration of the unit. Also, send home with students the URL so they can share Ask Hannah with parents.

11) Through positive and corrective peer feedback, arrive at a complete and accurate class definition of symmetry and line of symmetry. Record these on the Line of Symmetry chart from Lesson 13, Reflections.

12) Add symmetry and line of symmetry to the Quilt word board. Direct students to add symmetry and line of symmetry to their glossary (Day 2, Lesson 9, Bring It To a Fine Gloss-ary) along with an illustration and/or example and definition. At the end of the day, check individual glossaries for accuracy of entries. OPTION: This can be a learning center activity to be completed at appropriate times during the day.

13) Send home with students a copy of the Literacy Link page, Mirror, Mirror, (In Associated File) and the URL for Ask Hannah Student Web Lesson.

14) Collect group and individual student work. Formative assessment occurs as students’ work is check for accuracy. Data obtained should be used to guide further instruction.

OPTION II: Use the beginning portion of Ask Hannah (Student Web Lesson) to gain students’ attention. (Do not go through the entire lesson at this point.) Let them get the gist of the Web lesson. Then, as they work with the De’scovery Pictures they can pretend to be part of Sam E. Ness’ class.

Assessments

Formative assessment occurs, as group exploration is monitored as students uncover the characteristics of symmetry and locate the line of symmetry. Ideas to be discovered are things such as: symmetry is when both halves of a design are the exact opposite; they are the mirror image of the other; everything on one half is in the exact same place on the other half; if a design or picture is folded in half, and both halves meet and match exactly, they are symmetrical; that a symmetrical picture has two congruent halves, etc. Data gleaned from student work should be used to guide further instruction.

Extensions

1) This is Lesson 14 – Mirror, Mirror; a Math lesson
Lessons 1 – 6 are for Day 1 of the unit Geo Jammin’ By DeSign
Lessons 7 – 11 are for Day 2 of the unit Geo Jammin’ By DeSign
Lessons 12 – 17 are for Day 3 of the unit Geo Jammin’ By DeSign
Lessons 18 – 23 are for Day 4 of the unit Geo Jammin’ By DeSign
Lessons 24 – 28 are for Day 5 of the unit Geo Jammin’ By DeSign
Lessons 29 – 32 are for Day 6 of the unit Geo Jammin’ By DeSign.
Lessons 33 – 38 are for Day 7 of the unit Geo Jammin’ By DeSign
Lessons may reflect modifications of, but are designed in conjunction with the Reading Framework approach to classroom instruction and may be adapted to the Four Block Classroom.

2) Ask Hannah; an interactive Student Web Lesson affords students the opportunity to practice symmetry at a computer workstation. Have this interactive lesson available to students for learning and review throughout the duration of the unit.
3) Students can practice symmetry by coloring pre-printed designs symmetrically and demonstrating the line of symmetry. Printed books can be purchased at educational shops or go online and print out quilt designs from WWQP Quilt Coloring Book. (See Weblinks section) These patterns are small, but give students an idea of how each quilt block is made, then sewn together to make the whole quilt.
4) The Beacon Unit Plan associated with this lesson can be viewed by clicking on the link located at the top of this page or by using the following URL: http://www.beaconlearningcenter.com/search/details.asp?item=3004. Once you select the unit’s link, scroll to the bottom of the unit plan page to find the section, Associated Files. This section contains links to the Unit Plan Overview, Diagnostic and Summative Assessments, and other associated files (if any).
5) If a journal is kept for this unit, allow students time to reflect on this activity.

Web Links

Click on this link for Ask Hannah, a Student Web Lesson by Julie Thompson.
Ask Hannah

See Extensions for suggested use.
Printable Coloring Book

Attached Files

Supplemental pages     File Extension: pdf

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