Beacon Lesson Plan Library

Geo Jammin' By Design - Day 4, Lesson 23: Colors To Dye For

Katie Koehnemann
Bay District Schools

Description

Experiencing samples and reading about colors in fabric deepen understandings that works of art reflect cultural heritage, that trade helps families meet their basic needs, and that people can use and conserve their natural resources.

Objectives

The student reads informational texts for specific purposes (including but not limited to performing a task, learning a new task, sequentially carrying out the steps of a procedure, locating information to answer a question).

The student knows some works of art that reflect the cultural heritage of the community or country (for example, paintings, statues).

The student knows ways trade helps families in different places meet their basic needs of clothing, food, and shelter.

The student knows ways people can conserve and replenish natural resources.

Materials

-A copy of Colors To Dye For (See Associated File) for each student of a small guided reading group
-OPTIONAL: A color transparency of each of the colored textile pictures that accompany the text. (See Associated File)
-Swatches of natural fabrics dyed with natural resources (See Preparations)
-Small guided reading groups
-Materials for guided reading, such as chart paper, cards for new vocabulary, etc.

Preparations

1) Prior to this lesson, dye several swatches of natural fabric using natural dyes. I suggest doing this at home and bringing the colored fabrics in. The swatches need not be larger than 6 X 6 inch to 8 X 8 inch squares. Use only natural fibers such as cotton, linen, and wool. Polyester will not accept dye. Natural items to use for dyeing are beets, tea leaves, blueberries, and strawberries. If you are adventuresome, explore tree bark, leaves, and non-edible berries from the yard.
2) Print copies of the text ‘Colors To Dye For’ from the Associated File.
3) OPTONAL: Make a color transparency of each of the two textile photos in the Associated file to share with students as a visual as they read.
4) Any tools you ordinarily use when conducting your guided reading lessons. (Charts, word cards, etc.)
5) Familiarize yourself with the text and select any new or difficult words to review with students.

Procedures

For each small guided reading group:
1) Begin by holding up swatches of fabric to show students varying colors. Pass pieces of fabric around so students have a chance to look at them closely. Then share their ideas about how they think the color in the fabric came to be.

2) Place fabrics on display at the front of the reading group.

3) Distribute copies of Colors To Dye For. (See Associated File)

4) Conduct a guided reading lesson using guided reading strategies. (See Weblinks Section)

5) Formative assessment occurs as students respond to critical thinking questions with regards to the social studies content of the text. Questions should guide students’ responses to demonstrate further development of understandings about: use and conservation of natural resources; the selection and use of colors make artistic qualities of a quilt block design more evident; that colors give indication of the types of dyes used which enlighten us to the cultural heritage of the time; and the creative use of color made a quilt more valuable as a trade item.
*Some sample questions to use during the reading might be:
A. What are the basic needs of people? (Food, clothing, shelter)
B. Explain how cloth meets a basic need? (It shelters from cold, like with quilts. Clothes are made from it.)
C. Explain why early people wanted to color fabric? (Most natural fibers are plain in color. Ladies wanted to add color to their homes and their clothing.)
D. Explain what is meant by natural resource. (These are natural resources because they occurred naturally in nature.)
E. What natural resources did they use to make dye? (Plants, roots, berries, and leaves.)
F. How did coloring fabric make a quilt more desirable as a trade item? (Ladies could buy or trade for one that had the colors in it they wanted.)
G. How did adding color to fabric make quilting more of an artistic project? (Quilters could use colors to add symmetry. Selected colors had to have a desirable effect and look good together.)

6) Close the session by having students guess what natural resource was used to dye each of the sample swatches they were shown.

Assessments

Formative assessment occurs as students respond to critical thinking questions with regard to the social studies content of the text. Questions should guide students’ responses to demonstrate further development of understandings about use and conservation of natural resources, the selection and use of colors for fabrics made the artistic qualities of a quilt block design more evident, that colors give indication of the types of dyes used which enlighten us to the cultural heritage of the time, and the creative use of color made a quilt more valuable as a trade item. (For specific examples see Procedures)

Extensions

1) This is Lesson 23 – Colors To Dye For; Component – Guided Reading
Lessons 1 – 6 are for Day 1 of the unit Geo Jammin’ DeSign
Lessons 7 – 11 are for Day 2 of the unit Geo Jammin’ DeSign
Lessons 12 – 17 are for Day 3 of the unit Geo Jammin’ DeSign
Lessons 18 – 23 are for Day 4 of the unit Geo Jammin’ By DeSign
Lessons 24 – 28 are for Day 5 of the unit Geo Jammin’ By DeSign
Lessons 29 – 32 are for Day 6 of the unit Geo Jammin’ By DeSign.
Lessons 33 – 38 are for Day 7 of the unit Geo Jammin’ By DeSign
Lessons may reflect modifications of, but are designed in conjunction with the Reading Framework approach to classroom instruction and may be adapted to the Four Block Classroom.
2) The Beacon Unit Plan associated with this lesson can be viewed by clicking on the link located at the top of this page or by using the following URL: http://www.beaconlearningcenter.com/search/details.asp?item=3004. Once you select the unit’s link, scroll to the bottom of the unit plan page to find the section, Associated Files. This section contains links to the Unit Plan Overview, Diagnostic and Summative Assessments, and other associated files (if any).
3) Ask Hannah (Interactive Student Web Lesson) teaches and reviews symmetry concepts. Use as a learning center.
4) If a journal is kept for this unit, allow students time to reflect on this activity

Web Links

Reading strategies
Just Read Now

Attached Files

Attached file     File Extension: pdf

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