Beacon Lesson Plan Library

Inside Information

Laurie Ayers
Bay District Schools

Description

This lesson is for Day 3 of the unit [Inventions and Inventors]. Students use a variety of references and write to inform as they explore significant inventors and inventions and the impact of the inventions in the field of communication.

Objectives

The student reads and organizes information (for example, in story maps, graphs, charts) for different purposes (for example, being informed, following directions, making a report, conducting interviews, taking a test, performing a task).

The student uses a variety of reference materials to gather information, including multiple representations of information (for example, maps, charts, photos).

The student writes for a variety of occasions, audiences, and purposes (for example, letters to invite or thank, stories or poems to entertain, information to record).

The student understands how scientific discoveries have helped or hindered progress regarding human health and lifestyles.

The student knows selected significant people and the impact of their achievements in world in the fields of communication and technology since the Renaissance.

The student understands ways these devices impacted society.

Materials

-Various reference materials about inventions and inventors from different fields such as communication, transportation, technology, medical, recreational, scientific, foods, etc. (See Bibliography in Unit Attachment in extensions)
-Several different types of reference materials (for example, encyclopedia, Weblinks, chart, timeline, reference book, photo, etc.) for each communication invention/inventor (i.e., telegraph/Morse, telephone/Bell, wireless telegraph which led to the radio/Marconi, television/Farnsworth, Magnetic Tape Recorder/Marvin Camras, CD/Russell, personal computer/Jobs and Wosniak, and WWW/Berners-Lee) (See sample Reference List in associated file)
-Background Information for the teacher (see associated file)
-Sample Graphic Organizer, one teacher copy (see associated file)
-Writing surface, such as a dry erase board, a chalkboard, or chart paper to draw a graphic organizer on
-Markers or chalk
-Inventions and Inventor Cards, one set (see associated file)
-Great Invention Summary, one per small group (see associated file)
-Photographs of selected inventions and inventors (see associated file)
-Small bag or hat for the Inventions and Inventors Cards
-Student Web Lesson [Max and Mavis and the Case of the Missing Inventors, Part 1: Communication]
-Summative Assessment 1 (see extensions), one copy per student

Preparations

1. Gather materials. Note: Reference materials need to be grade level appropriate.
2. Locate the suggested Weblink concerning the history of basketball (http://encarta.msn.com/encnet/refpages/refarticle.aspx?refid=761563536)
referred to in Step 18 of Procedures and bookmark it for easy reference.
3. Download and make copies of Summative Assessment 1, one per student (see extensions).
4. Read Background Information in associated file.
5. Download and make a copy of the Sample Graphic Organizer.
6. Download and make a copy of Inventions and Inventor Cards.
7. Cut and fold the Inventions and Inventor Cards. Place them in a bag or hat so a student from each small group can select one.
8. Download and make copies of the Great Invention Summary, one per small group.
9. Download and make copies of the Great Invention Summary Checklist, one per small group.
10. Make arrangements with the school media specialist for your students to conduct research in the media center on Day 5.

Procedures

1. Walk to the front of the room carrying an armful of books about inventions in different fields such as technology, scientific, medical, foods, transportation, recreational, communications, etc.)

2. Explain to students that you are in a quandary. There are just too many books about inventions!

3. Think aloud to students and state that you know people write for a variety of occasions, audiences, and purposes. Sometimes people write for pleasure, such as writing a letter to one’s grandmother. Sometimes people write to inform, such as to write a report.

4. Explain you are going to write to inform. You are going to make a graphic organizer to help you get a better idea about the different types of inventions.

5. Use topics from the reference books to model how to make a graphic organizer with details of the different fields of inventions (see Sample Graphic Organizer in associated file).

6. Acknowledge the graphic organizer helps, but you are still confused as to which topic the class should study.

7. Pretend to be thinking.

8. Explain you remember there is something in the classroom that can help you narrow the decision.

9. Walk to the board where the standards for the unit are posted.

10. Point to standards.

11. Read the standards aloud. Review the vocabulary words and meanings for communication, technology, scientific, and impact.

12. Call on student volunteers to underline or circle the fields mentioned in the standards.

13. Explain that students will learn about inventions and inventors in these fields during the unit.

14. Discuss how an invention might belong in several fields. For example, the invention of the telephone fits in the communication, technology, and scientific fields. It is a technology tool that helps us communicate. It was invented using scientific experimentation and processes.

15. State today students will use the reference materials to learn about significant inventions and inventors in the field of communication and brainstorm how those inventions impacted or changed society. Take a few minutes to help students understand what it was like before the telephone, fax and television. Ask them how they could communicate without a telephone, computer, or fax. Ask them what would they do after supper if they didn't have a television, radio, computer or stero. Describe how families used to sit around the radio in the evening listening to music and news. Students need a background of this knowledge before beginning their research.

16. Display the various reference materials (see Reference List in associated file) you’ve collected about significant inventions and inventors in the field of communication.

17. Point out the different kinds of references such as nonfiction books, reference books, Websites, photographs of inventors/inventions, a timeline or chart, etc.

18. Using a field other than communication (for example, the field of recreation and how the game of basketball was invented – see History of Basketball Weblink), model how to read for information about an invention and organize the information read on the Great Inventions Summary (see associated file).

19. Model how to use the organized information to report to the class about the invention/inventor.

20. Point out there is so much information about communication inventions/inventors you need for the students to work in small groups and do some investigation. Then each group will report back to the class.

21. Divide students into small groups.

22. Let a student from each group select one of the Invention/Inventor Cards (see associated file) from a bag or hat.

23. Remind students that a discovery is something seen or known for the first time.

24. Provide each group with grade level appropriate reference materials about the invention/inventor (see Reference List in associated file).

25. Provide each group with a Great Invention Summary form.

26. Encourage students to think about the communication invention they chose and determine if it could also be considered a scientific discovery. If so, ask students to put a star beside the name of the invention on the Great Invention Summary.

27. Each student (or pair of students) in the group is to use one of the references the teacher supplied. Note: Pair a less capable reader with a fluent reader to facilitate learning.

28. Students are to read the reference and locate information about the invention/inventor and record their thoughts on notebook paper. (You may choose to use the graphic organizer from the lesson, Imagine That, in this unit instead of notebook paper.) The name of the reference used is recorded also.

29. Facilitate student research and provide guidance when needed.

30. When finished, students share the notes with others in their group.

31. Students in each group determine which notes they will record on the Great Invention Summary (see associated file) and organize the information on the form.

32. Each group also lists references for the information recorded on the Great Invention Summary.

33. Finally, students in each small group discuss ways the invention impacted or changed society. If the invention could also be considered a scientific discovery, students determine how the scientific discovery helped or hindered (hurt) progress regarding human health or lifestyles.

34. Responses chosen by the group are recorded on the Great Inventions Summary.

35. Discuss the criteria listed on the Great Invention Summary Checklist.

36. Allow time for students to work in groups.

37. Upon completion, each group informs the rest of the class about the invention, inventor, and the invention’s impact on society (or how it helped or hurt progress regarding human health or lifestyles).

38. A Great Invention Summary Checklist (see associated file) is used to formatively assess each group’s effort.

39. Display the Great Invention Summary papers in the classroom to serve as a reference for students.

NOTE: At this time, explain Summative #1 to students. (see unit's attached files) Make sure students understand what they will be doing and the time frame in which it should be accomplished.

40. Students complete a journal entry for Day 3 according to the Daily Journal Prompts (see Unit Attachment in extensions).

41. Formatively assess journal entries using the Unit Writing Checklist in the Unit Attachment (see extensions). Provide feedback that is both positive and guiding. Positive feedback might include, “Yes, I’m sure not having a telephone would make it more difficult to talk with your out of town relatives.” Guiding feedback might include, “Can you think of other activities that might help you relax if you had no television?”

42. Students continue working in pairs to complete the Student Web Lesson [Max and Mavis and the Case of the Missing Inventors, Part 1: Communication] (see Weblinks). To facilitate learning, it is suggested that the teacher pair an accomplished reader with an emerging reader.

Assessments

Formatively assess each group’s Great Invention Summary using the Great Invention Summary Checklist. Provide feedback that is both positive (Fantastic! Marconi is credited with inventing the radio.) and guiding (Did your group remember to list references?). Formatively assess student journal entries using the Unit Writing Checklist found in the Unit Attachment (see extensions). Assess journal entries for evidence of realistic ways the telephone and television impact daily lives.

Extensions

1. The Beacon Unit Plan associated with this lesson can be viewed by clicking on the link located at the top of this page or by using the following URL: http://www.beaconlearning center.com/search/details.asp?item=3005. Once you select the unit’s link, scroll to the bottom of the unit plan page to find the section, “Associated Files.” This section contains links to the Unit Plan Overview, Diagnostic and Summative Assessments, and other associated files (if any).
2. If possible, make arrangements with the media specialist to take students to the media center to conduct their research.
3. Pair a less capable reader with a more fluent reader to facilitate learning during the research activity.
4. Note: Remember, the Internet can be a valuable source to use for newer inventions. Pay attention to the reading level and the amount of information on the site before sharing with students. You might want to use a computer lab and bookmark some appropriate sites for students to use. Take the time to explore for these sites and bookmark them PRIOR to beginning the lesson.
5. Note: Throughout the unit, students do write for a variety of occasions and reasons, therefore the need for writing for a variety of occasions is met by the end of the unit.

Web Links

Web supplement for Inside Information
Invention Hall of Fame

Web supplement for Inside Information
Inventors Museum

Web supplement for Inside Information
Discovery Schools: Kathy Schrock’s Guide to Educators – History and Social Studies

Web supplement for Inside Information
Spotlight Biographies: Inventors

Web supplement for Inside Information
American Experience: Way Back, U. S. History for Kids: Technology in 1900

Web supplement for Inside Information
Inventor of the Week Archives

Web supplement for Inside Information
History of Basketball

Web supplement for Inside Information
Just Read Now

Web supplement for Inside Information
Inventions and Inventors

A museum is broken into and the thief mismatches pictures of inventions and inventors. Students are asked to help solve the mystery while learning about significant inventions and inventors in the field of communication since the Renaissance.
Max and Mavis and the Case of the Missing Inventors, Part 1: Communication

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