Beacon Lesson Plan Library

Skateboard Renegade

Sandi King
Bay District Schools

Description

What does skateboarding have to do with showing responsibility? Reading skills and strategies are taught while students use the novel, [Skateboard Renegade], to explore responsibility. A variety of simple machines is identified and their uses explored.

Objectives

The student develops vocabulary by listening to, reading, and discussing both familiar and conceptually challenging selections.

The student identifies examples of fact, fiction, or opinion in text.

The student understands a variety of textual organizations (for example, comparison and contrast, cause-and-effect, sequence of events).

The student understands how simple machines are used to make tasks possible.

Materials

- Christopher, Matt. [Skateboard Renegade]. Boston. Little, Brown. 2000, enough books for one book per two students
- Strategies Sheets for each chapter of the book for each student (from attached files) stapled together to form a packet with the Responsibility sheet as the last page
- Transparency of the chapter one Strategies Sheet for teacher use when modeling
- One set of cause and effect vocabulary, definitions, and activity cards (from attached file)
- A copy of the Fact, Fiction, or Opinion vocabulary cards and definitions (from attached file)
- A copy of the Fact, Fiction, or Opinion Sentences (from attached file)
- A copy of the Teacher Key (from attached file)
- Formative Assessment Checklists, one per student (from the unit plan attachments)
- Copies of the unit Summative Assessment #2, My Health, My Responsibility, one per student (from the unit plan attachments)
- Copies of the unit Summative Assessment #5, Traveling Waves, one per student (from the unit plan attachments)
- Unit question and scenario displayed on the wall (from the Beacon Lesson Plan, Responsibility)
- Student Web Lesson, What Caused It? (see the WebLink section for the link to the Web lesson)
- Computers with Web access, (a lab or as many as possible in the classroom)

Preparations

1. Become familiar with the reading vocabulary strategy of Contextual Redefinition from the Just Read Now Website. See the link in the Weblinks section of this lesson plan.
2. Become familiar with the reading strategy of Directed Reading Thinking Activity from the Just Read Now Website. See the link in the Weblinks section of this lesson plan.
3. Locate enough copies of [Skateboard Renegade] for one book for every two students in the class. Christopher, Matt. [Skateboard Renegade]. Boston. Little, Brown. 2000.
4. Download, print and duplicate the Strategies Sheets for each chapter of the book for each student (from attached files, pages 4 - 16) stapled together to form a packet with the Responsibility sheet as the last page of the packet. Locate an area of the classroom where these packets will be placed when turned in or waiting to be passed back to students.
5. Make a transparency of the chapter one Strategies Sheet for teacher use when modeling.
6. Download and print one set of Cause and Effect vocabulary, definition, and activity cards from attached file.
7. Download and print a copy of the Fact, Fiction, or Opinion vocabulary cards and definitions from attached file.
8. Download and print a copy of the Teacher Key from the attached file.
9. Locate the individual Formative Assessment Checklists being used with the unit.
10. Download, print, and duplicate Summative Assessment #2, My Health, My Responsibility, from the unit’s attached files. You need one copy per student.
11. Download, print, and duplicate Summative Assessment #5, Traveling Waves, from the unit’s attached files. You need one copy per student.
12. Have the unit question and scenario displayed on the wall. These were presented to students during the first lesson of the unit.
13. Preview the Student Web Lesson, What Caused That? The link to the Web lesson is found in the Weblink section of this lesson plan.
14. Locate computers with Web access. Schedule a lab if available, or use as many from the classroom as possible. These will be used for students to complete the Web lesson.

Procedures

Note: This is lesson two of seven in the Beacon Learning Center unit, A Television in My Room. This lesson covers seven sessions of instruction to be done during reading, on days two through eight of the unit. Each session is one day’s instruction.

Session One (Day 2 of the unit):

1. Gain student’s attention by reviewing the unit question and unit scenario that are posted in the classroom.

Unit Question: How can you show that you are responsible?

Unit Scenario: You only have one television in your house. Your dad loves to watch news on television and he usually controls the television. Your mom loves to buy things from QVC and she watches that channel when she gets to control the television. You never get to pick the television program. You’ve tried to convince your parents that you should have a television in your room, but they say you are not responsible. How can you prove you are responsible enough to have a television in your own room?

2. Students will be reading as two-member groups. If the number of students in the class does not allow for all two-member groups, one group of three must be made. Groups will change each day. Various ways of selecting groups should be used so that students cannot preselect. Students are given one minute to select a partner and sit quietly with the partner. Any students without a partner at the end of one minute will be grouped by the teacher rather than by student selection. Be sure students know this in advance as they usually will partner with anyone rather than not having a choice at all. Students will need their pencils while working in their groups.

* Suggestions for grouping:
1. The person on your left
2. The person before you in the alphabet
3. Girls pick a girl, boys pick a boy
4. The person who will keep you from getting in trouble

* Remind students that one way to show responsibility to self and to others is to be a good group member by behaving properly and doing their part of the work.

3. Once students, with their pencils, are sitting in their groups, pass out the books, [Skateboard Renegade]. Each group needs one book. To give meaning for reading this particular book, tie the book back to the unit question. Ask students why they think this book was selected for reading. In the discussion, bring them to the conclusion that skateboarders must be responsible for themselves and others. Direct students’ attention back to the responsibility charts built earlier today from the Responsibility lesson plan.

4. Pass out the Strategies Sheet packets. Each student needs one copy of the Strategies Sheet packet. Tell students that they must use many strategies, or ways of learning, when reading. The three strategies that will be taught and used while reading [Skateboard Renegade] are developing vocabulary, understanding cause and effect, and identifying fact, fiction, and opinion when reading. Locate each of these strategy areas on the Strategies Sheet. Vocabulary and cause and effect begin with chapter one; the fact, fiction, or opinion strategy begins with chapter six.

5. Model learning new vocabulary.

* Ask if students know what the word renegade means. With each response, ask why they think that is the meaning. Give affirmative and corrective feedback telling students why they are correct or guiding them towards the correct answer.

* Lead the students to define renegade as an individual who rejects tradition or does things differently than is usually done.

* To stimulate recall, ask if any of the students have ever been renegades and if so, how? Relating words to their own lives helps cement words into memory.

* Using an overhead of the Strategies Sheet, model adding the word and definition to the Strategies Sheet in the vocabulary area. Write the word (renegade), definition in your own words, and where the word was found (cover of the book). Students complete this entry on their Strategies Sheet as the teacher models.

* Place the strategies aside for the time being, but do not put them away.

6. Conduct this mini-lesson on cause and effect. Begin by revealing the vocabulary cards for cause and effect. Define cause as what makes something happen, and effect as the action that results from the cause. Add the vocabulary cards to the unit word wall.

* Give this example: I see a snake and I scream. What made me scream? The snake caused the next action, so seeing the snake is the cause. What action did seeing the snake cause? The snake caused me to scream. An easy way to remember this is to use the word because instead of cause. Now, think where the word because fits into these actions. I scream BECAUSE I see a snake. The part of the sentence following the word beCAUSE is the cause.

* Now call three students to assist. One student holds the card that says: I have a red bump. The second student holds the card that says: An ant bit me. The third student, holding the BECAUSE card, stands in line before the cause. Now the sentence either says: Because an ant bit me, I have a red bump, or I have a red bump because an ant bit me. Either way, BECAUSE is before the cause. Have a member of the class tell the cause. Ask for an explanation of the placement of the word because. Ask a different member of the class to tell the effect.

* Repeat this procedure for all three sets of cause and effect cards.

7. Before reading chapter one of the book, remind students that they are to look for the main character, Zach, being or not being responsible. As the chapter is read, students will be looking for cause and effects and vocabulary words that are not known.

8. Begin reading aloud as the class follows along. At the conclusion of page two, stop and ask if anyone has found an example of cause and effect. Two examples have been read at this point. First, on page one and two we learn that Mom is excited because Zach is accepted at Amherst Academy. Also on page two is the cause and effect example that Zach did well on his entrance exam and so was accepted to the academy. Point these two examples out to the students if they did not find them on their own. Do the BECAUSE test to determine which is the cause and which is the effect. Using the overhead transparency, model how to complete items one and two on the cause and effect portion of the Strategies Sheet. Students complete their sheets as the teacher models.

9. Ask if any words from the story were confusing. At this point, no words should be unknown, but this is a reminder to be on the lookout for unknown words. If a student relates that an unknown word was found, now is the time to list the unknown word in the vocabulary portion of the Strategies Sheet, under the word renegade.

10. Ask if any signs of responsibility have been found. Again, this is a reminder of what the students are looking for as the story is read. At this time, no responsibility issues have occurred.

11. Continue reading pages three through five aloud. At the completion of page five, stop and again ask about cause and effect, vocabulary, and responsibility. No student responses for unknown vocabulary should be found, but asking keeps the students focused on their task.

*On page five, students should identify a cause and effect. Zoey’s skateboard rolled because the driveway was downhill to the street. Have students complete number three in the cause and effect section of the Strategies Sheet as the teacher models on the transparency.

* Refer back to the lesson plan on responsibility. Review the two charts of who to be responsible for. Think aloud, asking yourself if anyone in the story is being (or not being) responsible. On page five, students should identify that Zach is being responsible for himself when he puts on his helmet, knee, wrist and elbow pads. He was not being responsible for Zoey when he did not put away his board. He is being responsible for Zoey when he reminds her to wear a helmet. The first two acts of responsibility are written on the Responsibility sheet as examples of how to complete this document. Students should write the third act on their sheets as the teacher models on the transparency.

12. Read page six. Again ask for unknown vocabulary, cause and effect, and demonstrations of responsibility. Students should identify unknown vocabulary from page six as this page contains some skateboarding words that students probably don’t know. Some possible words that will be added to the vocabulary section of the Strategies Sheet are listed on the Teacher Key from the attached file.

Remember that students are to discuss the possible meanings in this context and come to a consensus as to the probable meaning. It is important that students use context clues to decide the meaning of the word. When a student gives a meaning, have him/her relate what in the context made him/her decide on the meaning. Model the listing of the vocabulary words on the Strategies Sheet as students complete their own sheets.

13. Have partners read the rest of chapter one. Remind them to complete all sections of the Strategies Sheet as they locate a cause and effect, demonstration of responsibility, or unknown vocabulary. Partners read very quietly to each other taking turns in however manner the students decide. They may alternate reading pages or paragraphs. When one of the reading strategies or act of responsibility is located, it is recorded by both partners on their Strategies Sheet or Responsibility document. Allow about ten minutes to complete this task. Those finishing earlier may work on other assignments until other groups are finished. Really slow groups may need assistance from the teacher or other classmates. Remind really slow groups that they are not being responsible to the rest of the class or to themselves if they are not working to the best of their ability.

14. After ample time to complete the task, ask for student responses to the cause and effect section of the Strategies Sheet. As you call on individuals to relate the cause and effect patterns located, have the students explain which is the cause and which is the effect and how they know. (See the attached teacher key for suggested answers.) Give formative feedback affirming correct answers (Yes, the sidewalk sale caused Zach to ride his skateboard in the street.) and guiding incorrect ones (Use the word because in the sentence. Now can you tell which is the cause?). Call on as many students as possible. Mark the Formative Assessment Checklists.

15. Ask students what words were unknown. Call on students to tell what they think the meaning is from using the context of the story. Possible unknown words might include humiliation from page seven and pierced from page eight. Accept any other words the students may suggest. As the word and meaning are related, give formative feedback that affirms (Yes, when Brian said he was pierced, he meant he had a hole in his ear for an earring.) or guides students (Think about Brian’s new look. He said he is pierced, what could that mean?) to the correct answer. Call on as many students as possible. Mark the Formative Assessment Checklists.

16. Ask students if they located any other acts that showed responsibility from Zach. No other displays of responsibility were evident in the portion of the story that the students read on their own. If students relate a display of responsibility, discuss it with students and if the class comes to consensus that the act does show responsibility; write it on the Responsibility document. This is another opportunity to conduct a formative assessment that was taught in the first lesson plan of this unit. If appropriate from this discussion, the Formative Assessment Checklists may be marked for this standard.

17. Have students place their completed Strategies Sheet packets in the proper place to be turned it in to the teacher. Browse these documents before tomorrow's lesson to be sure the student is actively participating and that the documents are completed correctly. Any corrections should be noted on the student’s document. Mark the Formative Assessment Checklists.

18. Remind students of the unit question. Have students write a one-sentence note (exit slip) that tells one way they can show responsibility in school and at home. Allow thirty seconds for the students to share the responsibility they wrote about with a neighbor.

Session Two (Day 3 of the unit):

19. Review the unit question concerning responsibility. Have a quick discussion of how Zach was or was not responsible in chapter one.

20. Conduct a second mini lesson on cause and effect. Ask what students know about the cause and effect strategy for readings and writing. Remind the students that the cause and effect are not always in that order. Sometimes the effect is written first. Write this example on the board: Zach got in trouble because Zoey rode his board into the street. Have a student come to the board to circle the cause (Zoey rode the board into the street.). Ask the student how they knew it was the cause. Answers may include that Zoey acted first so she was the cause, or that the word because told which was the cause. Remind students that the cause is right after the word because.

21. Further the explanation of cause and effect by reminding students that the cause and effect must have a relationship. The effect will not happen without the cause. This relationship is called cause and effect because the cause forces the effect to happen. The effect happens BECAUSE of the cause. Another way to remember the cause and effect relationship is to ask why something happened. The answer to the why question is the cause. To demonstrate this point, write these examples on the board:

* Zach rode his board. Zoey is eating candy. Ask if there is any relationship between these two sentences. Can one happen without the other? When no relationship is found, the conclusion is that they are not a cause and effect.

* Zach gave Zoey some candy. Zoey is eating candy. Ask if there is any relationship between these two sentences. Does the word because fit in the sentences? Does one sentence answer the question of why the other event happened? Can one happen without the other? A relationship should be noted.

22. Use whatever methods you choose to have students find a partner. The partner should be different from yesterday’s partner. By changing partners each day, students have the opportunity to share with and learn from a variety of individuals. Peer teaching is a powerful tool and should be encouraged when working with a partner.

23. Distribute students’ Strategies Sheet packets. Ask for any questions concerning the information contained in these documents or how they were completed.

24. Pass out the books, one book per group.

25. Ask students what they think they should be looking for in today’s reading. Come to consensus with the students that, like yesterday, they are looking for acts that demonstrate responsibility, or lack of it, unknown vocabulary, and cause and effects. One additional thing to look for today is simple machines used in these chapters. (Simple machines were taught earlier today in lesson plan three, Machines Help.) This activity helps maintain the connection between reading and science content.

26. Call on students to read aloud from chapter two. Students should read one paragraph, then the next student reads.

27. As students read, call attention to any vocabulary words that you think may need to be added to their Strategies Sheet. Write the word and page number on the strategies sheet, but not the definition at this time. The story will lose continuity if it is started and stopped for long periods of time. After the chapter is complete, students use the context of the story to write the definition in their own words. See the Teacher Key for possible words to be included.

28. At the conclusion of chapter two, model completing the cause and effect portion of the Strategies Sheet using the overhead and a transparency of the sheet. As you and the students discuss the causes and effects, give formative feedback as to why they are correct or guide them towards the correct answer. Be sure to call on as many students as possible. Use your Formative Assessment Checklists to identify students not called on yesterday, or needing further instruction today.

29. Mark the Formative Assessment Checklists to indicate student understanding developing vocabulary and cause and effect.

30. Discuss acts that show responsibility, or lack of it. Model writing these displays of responsibility, or lack of responsibility, on the Responsibility transparency as students write on their individual sheets. Consult the Teacher Key from the attached file for possible answers.

31. Student partner groups complete chapter three, reading quietly only to their partners. As they read, the Strategies Sheet and Responsibility document should be completed.

32. Strategies Sheets for chapters one through three should be complete. Students turn in their Strategies Sheet packets to the teacher.

33. Browse the contents of the packets. Use the Teacher Key for answers. Conference with any student that is having difficulty understanding the skills, or that is not completing the documents correctly. Give formative feedback to guide students’ learning. Mark the Formative Assessment Checklists. Note: The conferencing may take place on the following day if time does not permit browsing the packets and conferencing today.

34. Remind students of the unit question. Have students write a one-sentence note (exit slip) that tells another way (different from yesterday) they can show responsibility in school and at home. Allow thirty seconds for the student to share the responsibility he/she wrote about with a different neighbor than yesterday.

Session Three (Day 4 of the unit):

35. Review the unit question concerning responsibility. Have a quick discussion of how Zach has or has not been responsible in chapters one through three.

36. Use whatever methods you choose to have students find a partner. The partner should not be one that the student has ready had. Remember that by changing partners each day, students have the opportunity to share with and learn from a variety of individuals.

37. Distribute students’ Strategies Sheet packets. Ask for any questions concerning the information contained in these documents or how they were completed.

38. Pass out the books, one book per group.

39. Ask students what they think they should be looking for in today’s reading. Come to consensus with the students that they are to be looking for acts that demonstrate responsibility or the lack of it, unknown vocabulary, and cause and effect. Additionally, to tie in with the science lessons, students can be on the lookout for simple machines in the story although this is not an item on the Strategies Sheet.

40. Student partners read chapters four and five quietly and complete the Strategies Sheet for both chapters. Entries on the Responsibility document should be made as appropriate. Allow ample time for completion.

41. When students are finished with chapters four and five, discuss the Strategies Sheet, calling on students to tell what they wrote and why. Mark the Formative Assessment Checklists as students respond. Give formative feedback that both affirms a correct answer, (Yes, needing money, Zach took Zoey’s money. This is an example of cause and effect.) and guide students to correct answers (Remember to use the BECAUSE rule, or to think about why to make the relationship. What is the cause of Zach taking Zoey’s money?)

42. Remind students of the unit question. Have students write a one-sentence note (exit slip) that tells another way (different from yesterday) they can show responsibility in school and at home. Allow thirty seconds for the student to share the responsibility he/she wrote about with a different neighbor than yesterday.

Session 4 (Day 5 of the unit):

43. Review the unit question concerning responsibility. Have a quick discussion of how Zach has or has not been responsible in chapters one through five.

44. Chapter six has the first example of fact, fiction, or opinion. Conduct this mini lesson to assist students in understanding fact, fiction, or opinion.

* Ask students if they know the difference in fact and fiction. The consensus that you are guiding students to is that facts are true (can be seen or proven), and fiction is not true (invented or imagined). Add the Fact and Fiction cards and their definitions from the attached file to the word wall.

* Ask students the difference in fact and opinion. Guide students to the understanding that opinions deal with thoughts, feelings, and emotions. Opinions are not based on fact or fiction but rather on the individual’s feelings. Add the Opinion card and its definition from the attached file to the word wall.

45. Use whatever methods you choose to have students find a partner. The partner should not be one that the student has already had. Remember that by changing partners each day, students have the opportunity to share with and learn from a variety of individuals.

46. Distribute students’ Strategies Sheet packets. Ask for any questions concerning the information contained in these documents or how they were completed.

47. Pass out the books, one book per group.

48. Ask students what they think they should be looking for in today’s reading. Come to consensus with the students that they are to be looking for acts that demonstrate responsibility or the lack of it, unknown vocabulary, cause and effect, and examples of fact, fiction, or opinion.

49. Read chapter six aloud to the students. As you read, students should be looking for unknown vocabulary, cause and effects, and examples of fact, fiction, or opinion. Use this opportunity to review and model completing the Strategies Sheet.

* At the end of page 53, ask about vocabulary. The word vegetarian may be new to students. If so, add the word and page to the Strategies Sheet and continue reading. The definition can be added at the end of the chapter as to not disrupt the flow of the reading.

* At the end of the chapter, use the Strategies Sheet to review cause and effect. As the cause and effect are discussed, give formative feedback affirming correct answers or guiding students to the correct answer. Mark the Formative Assessment Checklists as various students are called on to respond.

* Two examples of fact, fiction, or opinion are recorded on the Strategies Sheet. As students discuss whether these examples are fact, fiction, or opinion, and how they came to their conclusion, give formative feedback to affirm correct answers or guide students to the correct answers. Mark the Formative Assessment Checklists.

* Ask students if they found any demonstrations of responsibility in chapter six. None are evident, but this reminder keeps the objective of the unit on the student’s mind.

* Ask students if they found any new simple machines used in this chapter. None are noted, but this reinforces the reading/science connection.

50. Partners quietly read chapter seven and compete the Strategies Sheet and Responsibility document. Remind students that there are a couple of times in this chapter that Zach displays that he is being responsible.

51. Strategies Sheets for chapters six and seven should be complete. Students turn in their Strategies Sheet packets to the teacher.

52. Browse the contents of the packets. Use the Teacher Key for answers. Conference with any student that is having difficulty understanding the skills, or that is not completing the documents correctly. Give formative feedback to guide students’ learning. Mark the Formative Assessment Checklists. Note: The conferencing may take place on the following day if time does not permit browsing the packets and conferencing today. The summative assessment will be administered with session seven, so this would be a good time to study the Strategies Sheets noting students who need extra assistance.

53. Remind students of the unit question. Have students write a one-sentence note (exit slip) that tells another way (different from yesterday) they can show responsibility in school and at home. Allow thirty seconds for the student to share the responsibility he/she wrote about with a different neighbor than yesterday.


Session Five (Day 6 of the unit):

54. Review the unit question concerning responsibility. Have a quick discussion of how Zach has or has not been responsible.

55. Use whatever methods you choose to have students find a partner. The partner should not be one that the student has already had. Remember that by changing partners each day, students have the opportunity to share with and learn from a variety of individuals.

56. Distribute students’ Strategies Sheet packets. Ask for any questions concerning the information contained in these documents or how they were completed.

57. Pass out the books, one book per group.

58. Ask students what they think they should be looking for in today’s reading. Come to consensus with the students that they are to be looking for acts that demonstrate responsibility or the lack of it, unknown vocabulary, cause and effect, and examples of fact, fiction, or opinion.

59. Conduct a mini-lesson of fact, fiction or opinion.

* Begin by reviewing the words and definitions that were added to the word wall yesterday.

* Read the Fact, Fiction, or Opinion Sentences from the attached file. Call on a variety of students to tell whether each sentence is a fact, fiction, or opinion. Students must tell why they came to that conclusion. Use the Formative Assessment Checklists marked yesterday to guide questions for today. Also, the checklists will help determine which students need to be called on today, either because they did not have an opportunity to respond yesterday, or their responses were incorrect so more instruction or guidance is needed. Give formative feedback both to affirm correct answers and to guide students towards correct answers. Mark the Formative Assessment Checklists.

60. Read chapter eight aloud to the students. As unknown vocabulary or cause and effect situations are read, draw students’ attention to these.

61. Discuss the two examples of fact, fiction, or opinion from page 67 that are noted on the Strategies Sheet for chapter eight. Ask students to identify the kind of statement and to explain why that identity was chosen. Give formative feedback to affirm or correct answers. Model filling out the Strategies Sheet for chapter eight.

62. Partners quietly read chapter nine and complete the Strategies Sheet packets for these chapters.

63. When Strategies Sheets for chapters eight and nine are complete, students turn in their packets to the teacher.

64. Browse the contents of the packets. Use the Teacher Key for answers. Conference with any student that is having difficulty understanding the skills, or that is not completing the documents correctly. Give formative feedback to guide students’ learning. Mark the Formative Assessment Checklists. Note: The conferencing may take place on the following day if time does not permit browsing the packets and conferencing today. This is your final opportunity to locate students and give needed assistance before the summative assessment tomorrow.

65. Inform student that tomorrow they will be having an assessment of how well they understand using the text to understand vocabulary, cause and effect, and fact, fiction, or opinion. Show, but don’t distribute, your copy of Summative Assessment #2, My Health, My Responsibility to the students. Answer any questions the students may have concerning the assessment and the skills they are expected to know for the assessment.

66. Remind students of the unit question. Have students write a one-sentence note (exit slip) that tells another way (different from other days) they can show responsibility in school and at home. Allow thirty seconds for the student to share the responsibility he/she wrote about with a different neighbor than in the past.

Session Six (Day 7 of the unit):

67. Give Summative Assessment #2, My Health, My Responsibility. Collect the completed assessments and score according to the guidelines in the assessment file.

68. Review the unit question concerning responsibility. Have a quick discussion of how Zach has or has not been responsible.

69. Use whatever methods you choose to have students find a partner. The partner should not be one that the student has ready had. Remember that by changing partners each day, students have the opportunity to share with and learn from a variety of individuals.

70. Distribute students’ Strategies Sheet packets. Ask for any questions concerning the information contained in these documents or how they were completed.

71. Pass out the books, one book per group.

72. As a review, ask students what they think they should be looking for in today’s reading. As students answer, give feedback to promote recall. Come to consensus with the students that they are to be looking for acts that demonstrate responsibility or the lack of it, unknown vocabulary, cause and effect, and examples of fact, fiction, or opinion.

73. Partners quietly read chapters ten and eleven and complete the Strategies Sheet packets for these chapters.

74. At this point, students should be able to complete the Strategies Sheet packet for these two chapters without any teacher instruction or modeling. Use the Formative Assessment Checklists to identify students that need individual assistance and give the necessary instruction or guidance to those students.

75. When Strategies Sheets for chapters ten and eleven are complete, students turn in their packets to the teacher.

76. Browse the contents of the packets. Use the Teacher Key for answers. Conference with any student that is having difficulty understanding the skills, or that is not completing the documents correctly. Give formative feedback to guide students’ learning. Mark the Formative Assessment Checklists. Note: The conferencing may take place on the following day if time does not permit browsing the packets and conferencing today.

77. Students begin The Student Web Lesson, What Caused It? reinforcing the standard, cause and effect in text. The Student Web Lesson can be completed all at one time in a lab setting, or over the next three days in the classroom. Web lessons are most effective when pairs of students complete the lesson as a team. The peer interaction is a valuable part of learning and understanding. A link to the Web lesson is available in the Weblink section of this lesson plan.

78. Remind students of the unit question. Have students write a one-sentence note (exit slip) that tells another way (different from other days) they can show responsibility in school and at home. Allow thirty seconds for the student to share the responsibility he/she wrote about with a different neighbor than in the past.

Session Seven (Day 8 of the unit):

79. Review the unit question concerning responsibility. Have a quick discussion of how Zach has or has not been responsible.

80. Use whatever methods you choose to have students find a partner. The partner should not be one that the student has already had. Remember that by changing partners each day, students have the opportunity to share with and learn from a variety of individuals.

81. Distribute students’ Strategies Sheet packets. Ask for any questions concerning the information contained in these documents or how they were completed.

82. Pass out the books, one book per group.

83. Ask students what they think they should be looking for in today’s reading. Come to consensus with the students that they are to be looking for acts that demonstrate responsibility or the lack of it, unknown vocabulary, cause and effect, and examples of fact, fiction, or opinion.

84. Partners quietly read chapter twelve and complete the Strategies Sheet packets for this chapter.

85. At this point, students should be able to complete the Strategies Sheet packet without any teacher instruction or modeling. Use the Formative Assessment Checklists to identify students that need individual assistance and give the necessary instruction or guidance to those students.

86. When Strategies Sheets packet is complete, students turn in their packets to the teacher.

87. Browse the contents of the packets. Use the Teacher Key for answers. Conference with any student that is having difficulty understanding the skills, or that is not completing the documents correctly. Give formative feedback to guide students’ learning. Mark the Formative Assessment Checklists.

88. Inform student that tomorrow they will be having an assessment of how well they understand using the text to understand vocabulary, cause and effect, and fact, fiction, or opinion. Show students Summative Assessment #5, Traveling Waves. Answer any questions the students may have concerning the assessment and the skills they are expected to know for the assessment.

89. If all students have not had an opportunity to complete the Student Web Lesson, What Caused It? allow time for this activity to continue until all students have been given ample time.

90. Remind students of the unit question. Have students write a one-sentence note (exit slip) that tells another way (different from other days) they can show responsibility in school and at home. Allow thirty seconds for the student to share the responsibility he/she wrote about with a different neighbor than in the past.

Assessments

Formative assessments are conducted as described in the procedures section of the lesson plan. Both oral discussions and the Strategies Sheet packets are used while assessing students. The Formative Assessment Checklists from the unit plan file are used to record the formative assessments.

Unit Summative Assessment #2, My Health, My Responsibility, will be administered at the beginning of session six (day seven of the unit). All instructions, criteria and scoring are described on the assessment document available from the unit plan’s attached files. (See Weblinks)

Unit Summative Assessment #5, Traveling Waves, will be administered on the day following completion of this lesson plan. All instructions, criteria and scoring are described on the assessment document available from the unit plan’s attached files.

Extensions

1. Reading can be done whole group, or in small groups as your class or purpose dictates. As a guided reading lesson, small ability groups are necessary. As a skills lesson, whole group might be more appropriate.

2. If reading is a problem, but learning the skills is still the goal, the text can be read aloud by the teacher.

3. This can be a stand-alone lesson without reference to the unit.

4. The Beacon Unit Plan associated with this lesson can be viewed by clicking on the link located at the top of this page or by using the following URL: http://www.beaconlearningcenter.com/search/details.asp?item=3262. Once you select the unit’s link, scroll to the bottom of the unit plan page to find the section, “Associated Files.” This section contains links to the Unit Plan Overview, Diagnostic and Summative Assessments, and other associated files, (if any).

Web Links

1. This Student Web Lesson is an interactive Web lesson that should be completed by all students.
What Caused It?

2. This is a wonderful teacher resource with explicit descriptions, charts and some video clips showing the strategies being taught.
Just Read Now

3. The Just Read Now site explains the Vocabulary, Contextual Redefinition strategy that is one vocabulary strategy used in this lesson.
Just Read Now, Contextual Redefinition

4. Active Reading Strategies, Directed Reading Thinking Activity is one directed reading strategy used in this lesson.
Just Read Now, Active Reading Strategies

5. This site gives a variety of skateboard terms to enhance student interest.
Glossary of Skateboarding Terms

Attached Files

Vocabulary cards and fact, fiction, or opinion examples.     File Extension: pdf

Strategies Sheets and answer key.     File Extension: pdf

Return to the Beacon Lesson Plan Library.