Beacon Lesson Plan Library

Playground Games

Sandi King
Bay District Schools

Description

This review lesson allows students to use their knowledge of velocity and wave behavior while competing in playground games.

Objectives

The student selects an appropriate measurement unit for labeling the solution to real-world problems.

The student selects and uses the appropriate tool for situational measures (for example, measuring sticks, scales and balances, thermometers, measuring cups, gauges).

The student solves problems involving equations or simple inequalities using manipulatives, diagrams, or models, symbolic expressions, or written phrases.

The student translates problem-solving situations into expressions and equations using a variable for the unknown.

The student knows that velocity describes a change in distance over time.

The student understands that waves behave differently in different media (for example, water, a wall, the atmosphere, a vacuum).

The student understands how simple machines are used to make tasks possible.

The student uses tools to measure changes in position, direction, and speed of an object after a push or pull has been applied.

Materials

- Various measurement tools including stopwatches, wrist watches with a second hand, meter sticks, tape measurers, various scales and balances, and any other measurement tools available
- A soccer ball
- A playground slide
- A radio or CD player
- A variety of packing materials such as foam, foam peanuts, newspaper, about five light jackets or sweaters from students, about five winter coats from students
- A large box about the size a computer would come in
- A wheel barrow
- A skateboard
- A moving dolly
- A piece of rope at least six feet long
- Several half-gallon pitchers made of a variety of materials (glass, heavy plastic, thin plastic, metal, pottery)
- Enough water to fill the pitchers
- A coach's whistle
- Alcohol or Clorox wipes
- Copies of the Playground Games (see attached file)
- Studentsí pencils
- At least six calculators
- Game signs from the attached file
- Pictures of simple machines in real life from the lesson plan, Machines Help

Preparations

1. Collect various measurement tools including stopwatches, wrist watches with a second hand, meter sticks, tape measurers, various scales and balances, and any other measurement tools available and place them where they are easily accessible to students. This collection must include at least five tools for measuring distance in inches or centimeters and at least five tools for measuring time in seconds.
2. Locate one soccer ball and have it available in the classroom.
3. Talk to the PE teachers or others that may be using the playground slide during the day and secure a time that your class may have access to the slide.
4. Locate a radio or CD player.
5. Collect a variety of packing materials such as foam, foam peanuts, newspaper, about five light jackets or sweaters from students, about five winter coats from students that will be used by students to soundproof a large box. These materials should be accessible to students.
6. Locate one large box about the size a computer would come in. Talk to your media person. Often times they have computer boxes that they must store in case of computer warranty work.
7. Locate a wheelbarrow that can be used by the class for the day.
8. Locate a moving dolly that can be used by the class for the day.
9. Locate a skateboard that can be used by the class for the day.
10. Locate a piece of rope at least six feet long that can be used by the class for the day.
11. Collect several half-gallon pitchers made of a variety of materials (glass, heavy plastic, thin plastic, metal, pottery). Asking students to bring pitchers from home will supply a variety. Usually school lunchrooms have metal pitchers that may be borrowed.
12. Locate a sink and fill the pitchers with water.
13. Locate a coach's whistle.
14. Purchase or collect alcohol or Clorox wipes for cleaning the whistle between student uses.
15. Download, print, and copy Playground Games from the attached files. These should be stapled into packets.
16. Students are responsible for bring their pencils to the playground games.
17. Six calculators should be available for calculating velocity. Three calculators are located at each of the velocity games and will be shared by the members of the group. If more calculators are available, one per group member would decrease waiting time for group members.
18. Download and print the game signs. Tape them to the back of chairs. As students assemble the materials for the games, these chairs will mark the location and number of the game.
19. Select one of the pictures of simple machines in the real world from the lesson plan, Machines Help.

Procedures

Note: This is the last of seven in the Beacon Learning Center unit, A Television in My Room. This lesson covers science and math content and is to be done on the tenth day of the unit. This lesson brings closure to the science portion of the unit.

1. Gain the studentsí attention by showing one of the pictures of simple machines in the real world. Ask what kind of simple machine is shown and what task it makes possible. Mark the formative assessment checklists.

Making everything relevant :

2. Review the unit question and scenario from the lesson plan, Responsibility, now on display on the wall of the classroom.

3. Review the charts on display that list ways to be responsible to self and others.

4. Review the chart that displays the two ways that were chosen by students as the main ways to demonstrate responsibility to others involving having televisions in their own rooms. Those are: 1) My television must be turned off when I leave the room or fall asleep. 2) The volume will not bother others.

5. Review the rubric for Summative Assessments #3, I Am Responsible. Remind students of the due date. Answer any questions concerning the project.

6. Review the rubric for Summative Assessment #4, I Canít Hear You. Remind students of the due date. Answer any questions concerning the project.

Science and Math Ė

7. Announce that students will be showing that they understand about velocity, simple machines, and waves outside on the playground today. Playground games are five tasks that students will complete. Each task allows students to use the new science and math knowledge that they have learned in this unit.

8. Distribute Playground Games packets to each student.

9. Divide the class into five groups.

10. Each group is responsible for setting up one game as described on their packets. This responsibility includes gathering all materials and transporting them to the designated area.

11. Allow about ten minutes for all games to be prepared.

12. Each group will begin with the game they prepared and rotate to each of the five games when signaled to begin or change games. Students are directed to follow the instructions in their packets at each of the games.

13. As the students participate, the teacher circulates to formatively assess and give formative feedback to students. Since this is the last science/math lesson of the unit, all students should have a satisfactory understanding of the science and math standards. Use the Formative Assessment Checklists to determine students that may need further instruction and use this time to meet their needs.

14. At the completion of the rotation, students return to the game they set up. It is now their responsibility to dismantle the game and return all materials to their places in the classroom.

15. Lead a group discussion about each of the games. Ask a lot of leading questions and inquiring questions. See the attached file for possible questions about each game.

16. As the discussion progresses, do an informal oral formative assessment of studentís knowledge of wave behavior in different media, how simple machines can make tasks possible, how velocity was measured and calculated, what tools are used to measure velocity, what units could be used to measure velocity. Use your Formative Assessment Checklists to determine which students should be called on to give answers to various questions. Your goal is to give every opportunity for all students to understand all standards, so using the Formative Assessment Checklists as a tool will guide you in identifying those students still in need of assistance. This is the last opportunity to give formative feedback to affirm understanding or to correct misunderstanding before students present their summative assessment projects.

17. Collect studentsí Playground Games packets to check their figuring of velocity. You are looking for use of appropriate measurement tools, appropriate units of measure, using the correct velocity formula, and correctly translating the measurements into the formula. Give written formative feedback to affirm correct understandings or to correct misunderstandings. Mark the Formative Assessment Checklists.

18. Return the packets to students as soon as possible so they can be used as a resource when completing the summative projects.

19. Each student completes his daily journal entry by discussing his favorite playground game, telling why it was his favorite and what he learned from it.

20. Collect the journals and give formative feedback as to whether the student understands the concept chosen. Remember the wording of the standards while writing formative feedback in the journals. Mark the Formative Assessment Checklists.

Assessments

The formative assessment tool for assessing the math standards is the Playground Games packet. Formative feedback is written on the packet before returning it to the students.

The assessment tool for assessing the science stands is the student journals. Students complete their daily journal entries by discussing what they discovered new today about simple machines, or waves, or soundproofing, or velocity. Collect the journals and give formative feedback as to whether the student understands the concept chosen. Remember the wording of the standards while writing formative feedback in the journals.

The Formative Assessment Checklists will be marked.

Extensions

1. If time does not permit all five games, the slide game and the radio in the box game can be omitted.

2. Students can be paired instead of grouped to participate in the games.

3. Individual conferences can be held to further formatively assess studentís knowledge.

4. Ask students to devise games that demonstrate either use of simple machines to make a task possible, show that velocity describes a change in distance over time, or that show waves behave differently in different media.

5. When reading journal entries, the feedback can be given in a color code system. Highlighted yellow means the response is right on target. Pink highlight means bring your journal and letís talk. Using this method is fast for the teacher, gives students affirmative feedback, and allows for student/teacher conferences on concepts or misconceptions that need further explanations.

6. The Beacon Unit Plan associated with this lesson can be viewed by clicking on the link located at the top of this page or by using the following URL: http://www.beaconlearningcenter.com/search/details.asp?item=3262. Once you select the unitís link, scroll to the bottom of the unit plan page to find the section, ďAssociated Files.Ē This section contains links to the Unit Plan Overview, Diagnostic and Summative Assessments, and other associated files, (if any).

Attached Files

Rules and data sheets needed for the playground games.†††††File Extension: pdf

Playground Games cards.†††††File Extension: pdf

Suggested questions for the playground games.†††††File Extension: pdf

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