Beacon Lesson Plan Library

Geo Jammin' - Day 2, Lesson 6: Rhyme and Reason

Katie Koehnemann
Bay District Schools

Description

Practicing purposeful listening during this Shared Reading component, students experience mathematical language as it is enjoyed in the rhyme and reason of poetry.

Objectives

The student writes for familiar occasions, audiences and purposes (including but not limited to entertaining, informing, responding to literature).

The student uses volume, phrasing, and intonation appropriate for different situations (for example, large or small group settings, sharing oral stories, dramatic activities).

The student describes attributes of two-dimensional shapes using mathematical language (for example, curves, edges, vertices, angles).

The student knows the names of two-dimensional and three-dimensional figures presented in various orientations in the environment.

Materials

-Math Mouth word board displayed (Lesson 2, Math Mouth)
-Song lyrics displayed (Lesson 4, Sing a Song of Shapes)
-The poem “Shapes” by Shel Silverstein written on chart paper (Silverstein, Shel. [A Light in the Attic]. New York: Harper, 1981.)
-Student Math Moments journals (Lesson 3, Math Moments on My Mind)
-The poem “Shapes” rewritten on chart paper (by the teacher) substituting three-dimensional figure names for two-dimensional shape names

Preparations

1. Copy “Shapes,” the poem by Shel Silverstein, onto chart paper. (Silverstein, Shel. [A Light in the Attic]. New York: Harper, 1981.)
2. On a separate sheet of chart paper, rewrite “Shapes,” substituting the correct corresponding three-dimensional figure for the two-dimensional shape. (For example: cube should be substituted for square; rectangular solid for rectangular; pyramid for triangle; cylinder for circle.)
3. OPTIONAL: Be familiar with the poem and create movements to go along with it.
4. Record student formative assessment results using the Assessment Management Tool. (See Associated Files in the Unit Plan)

Procedures

1. Gain students’ attentions, by reciting the poem “Shapes” aloud. Use volume, phrasing, and intonation to emphasize the story of the poem, content words, and voice qualities. Adding movement to the words will intrigue students and tap the kinesthetic learner.

2. Repeat the poem, to again model voice qualities. Invite students to join in. Encourage participation and mimicking of the voice qualities.

3. Direct students to take out their Math Moments journals. Write the first question on the board. “Who are the characters in the poem?” Allow time for students to respond in their journals. (This poem is about a square, a triangle, and a circle.) Monitor students as they write, formatively assessing individuals for the quickness and ease, or reluctance and difficulty with which they begin to respond. The poem may need to be recited aloud again.

4. Call on various students to share one of the poem’s characters they identified in their journal entry. Formatively assess student responses, listening for correct and accurate identification of a square, triangle, and circle. Offer positive and corrective feedback with regards to student voice quality.

5. Write the second question on the board. “What are the characters?” Allow time for students to respond in their journals. (The characters are two-dimensional shapes.) Monitor students as they write, formatively assessing individuals for the quickness and ease, or reluctance and difficulty with which they begin to respond.

6. Call on various students to share their journal response to the second question. Formatively assess student responses, listening for understanding that the characters are two-dimensional shapes. Call on other students to offer positive and/or corrective feedback. Offer positive and corrective feedback with regards to student voice quality.

7. Write the directives on the board. “Draw each character. Explain how you know it is what it is.” Allow time for students to respond in their journal. (Students draw a square, triangle, and circle. Students write something to the effect that they can only be measured in two directions, that they have only one surface, etc.) Monitor students as they write, formatively assessing individuals for the quickness and ease, or reluctance and difficulty with which they begin to respond.

8. One at a time, call on various students to come to the board. Ask them to draw one of the characters, identify or name it (i.e. square), tell what it is (i.e. a two-dimensional shape), and to read the explanation they wrote in their journal of how they know it is what it is. Formatively assess responses listening for accurate shape identification and correct attributes. Peers should accept the answer as correct, or offer a corrected response. Call on other students to offer a more accurate response if the one given is incorrect or insufficient, formatively assessing peer feedback. Offer positive and corrective feedback with regards to student voice quality.

9. Recite the poem aloud again. Ask: “Is any other shape object mentioned in the poem? What is it? What shape is it? Is it two- or three-dimensional?” Ask each question one at a time, allowing various students to answer orally by raising their hand. Formatively assess students’ responses for correct and accurate identification of the rectangle. (“Yes. It is the square’s house. It is a rectangle.”)

10. Hang the poem, written on chart paper, where students can see it. Invite students to read along as words of the poem are pointed to.

11. Allow students time to enjoy this reading experience. Use variety in practicing voice qualities of volume, phrasing, and intonation. Be creative, utilizing various strategies for further repeated readings. Boys read some lines, girls others; get louder when they come to a mathematical term they know; one half of the students reads in response to the other half; stand and read; put in motions for parts/all of the poem and act them out; small groups perform it as the others listen for demonstration of voice qualities; etc.

12. Direct students to illustrate the poem in their journals. Allow time for students to draw a picture that illustrates the poem as they visualize it in their mind.

13. Call on students to hold up their illustrations. Share with students the illustration the author, Shel Silverstein, created to accompany his poem.

14. Challenge: “In your journal, rewrite the poem so it is about three-dimensional figures instead of two-dimensional shapes. Then draw an illustration of the newly written poem.” Allow students time to rewrite the poem substituting figure names for the shape names (cube should be substituted for square; rectangular solid for rectangular; pyramid for triangle; cylinder for circle), and creating an illustration for it.

15. Collect all student journals. At the end of the day check individual student journals for correct and accurate responses and word substitution on the rewrite assignment. Make note of students with misunderstandings and misconceptions, as these students will need further assistance with concepts. Use formative assessment data to drive further instruction.

16. Post on the wall the pre-prepared rewritten poem. Read the new poem in unison and parts. Students should be given the opportunity to self-assess by asking them how well they did on rewriting the poem in their journals. Allow students to share their success with this assignment.

Assessments

Experiencing technical language in poetry supplies students with a different vehicle for understanding and processing the meaning of vocabulary and concepts. Rhythm, rhyme, and motion give variety to ways to learn, remember, and understand the language of the standards. Poems introduced this day, serve as memory joggers throughout the remainder of the unit and beyond. Students’ progress in developing an understanding of the language and concepts is formatively assessed as students respond in individual journals (1) to questions about the language of the poem, and (2) to the directive to rewrite the poem using correct, corresponding three-dimensional terms. Student responses give insight to misunderstandings and misconceptions, allowing for proper guidance of further instruction and next steps.

Extensions

*Lessons may reflect modifications of, but are designed in conjunction with the Reading Framework approach to classroom instruction and may be adapted to the Four Block Classroom.
1. This is Lesson 6 – Rhyme and Reason; a Shared Reading lesson
Lessons 1 – 3 are for Day 1 of the unit Geo Jammin’
Lessons 4 – 7 are for Day 2 of the unit Geo Jammin’
Lessons 8 – 11 are for Day 3 of the unit Geo Jammin’
Lessons 12 – 15 are for Day 4 of the unit Geo Jammin’
Lessons 16 – 19 are for Day 5 of the unit Geo Jammin’
Lesson 20 is for Day 6 of the unit Geo Jammin’
Lesson 21 is for Day 7 of the unit Geo Jammin’
2. The Beacon Unit Plan associated with this lesson can be viewed by clicking on the link located at the top of this page or by using the following URL: http://www.beaconlearningcenter.com/search/details.asp?item=2959. Once you select the unit’s link, scroll to the bottom of the unit plan page to find the section, “Associated Files.” This section contains links to the Unit Plan Overview, Diagnostic and Summative Assessments, and other associated files (if any).
3. Check the Geo Jammin’ Glossary for word definitions. The glossary is located in the Associated File of Lesson 2, Math Mouth.
4. The Facts Please, Mr. Mumble is an interactive Student Web Lesson that addresses this standard; the student describes attributes of two-dimensional shapes using mathematical language (for example, curves, edges, vertices, angles). Students should visit the lesson regularly for optimal practice in describing two-dimensional attributes. The Facts Please, Mr. Mumble can be visited by clicking the link in the Weblinks section of this lesson plan or by using the following URL: http://www.beaconlearningcenter.com/search/details.asp?item=3161
5. Ask the ESE teacher for further modifications with regards to students needing extra assistance and/or learning strategies.
6. It is highly recommended that in planning for this unit, favorite math literature is pre-selected and used with the unit to enhance, enrich, and extend the learning of concepts. If the Self-Selected Reading component is part of the classroom design, appropriate literature books that emphasize geometry content need to be checked out from the library and put into your reading baskets. Teachers using this unit are encouraged to add any poems and/or songs about shapes they may know, as well.

Web Links

This is an interactive Student Web Lesson that addresses the standard: the student describes attributes of two-dimensional shapes using mathematical language (for example, curves, edges, vertices, angles).
The Facts Please, Mr. Mumble

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