Beacon Lesson Plan Library

No Plagiarism, Please!

Carol Rine
Bay District Schools

Description

This is the third lesson in a unit on expository writing. Instruction provides boundaries for taking notes by differentiating between paraphrasing, quoting, and summarizing. Students practice writing note cards.

Objectives

The student refines previously learned knowledge and skills of the seventh grade with increasingly complex reading texts and assignments and tasks (for example, monitoring comprehension, modifying understanding, summarizing, using text structure for recal, analyzing information to create a report).

The student records bibliographic information using a format such as source cards.

Materials

DAY ONE
-Overhead display method such as dry erase board, overhead projector, or chart paper (NOTE: I use an overhead projector)
-Goldfish Fact transparency or factual information for students to paraphrase from the subject area the teacher chooses for research
-Model and mini-lesson to demonstrate evaluating text and paraphrasing into notes appropriate for a report
-Decide classroom consequences for plagiarism, for example, redoing the report, poor grade, parent contact, or other
-Goldfish Fact in associated file

DAY TWO
-Access to subject area textbooks for the paraphrase practice --OR-- arrange to have copies made from a page out of one of the research sources for students to use for the paraphrase practice
-Note Card Format handout on transparency
- Student Notes describing the note-taking process
-Subject area textbook or you, the teacher, can duplicate a page from a source relating to the research theme and distribute copies to each student.
-Note Card Format handout for each student
-3x5 Index cards to distribute to students for note card practice

Preparations


DAY ONE
-Overhead display method such as dry erase board, overhead projector, or chart paper (NOTE: I use an overhead projector)
-Goldfish Fact transparency or factual information for students to paraphrase from the subject area the teacher chooses for research
-Model a mini-lesson to demonstrate evaluating text and paraphrasing into notes appropriate for a report NOTE: If there is access to a computer presentation cart (big screen TV and computer with online capabilities) use the Beacon Student Web Lesson Paraphrase Craze
-Decide classroom consequences for plagiarism, for example, redoing the report, poor grade, parent contact, or other.
-Goldfish Fact student copies

DAY TWO
-Access to subject area textbooks for the paraphrase practice or arrange to have copies made from a page out of one of the research sources for students to use for the paraphrase practice
-Note Card Format handout on transparency
-Ask student to keep notes describing the note-taking process NOTE: In this lesson, students take notes from the Student Web Lesson, Paraphrase Craze
-Subject area textbook or you, the teacher, can duplicate a page from a source relating to the research theme and distribute copies to each student.
-Note Card Format student copies
-3x5 index cards to distribute to students for note card practice

Procedures

This is the third lesson in an online unit entitled Info Expo. This third lesson is an introduction to note taking. The unit, as a whole, teaches the art of expository writing. This lesson provides students with an introduction to the boundaries required in avoiding plagiarism when taking notes. Teachers across subject areas and grade levels might use this lesson to support their own research units. The lesson plan spans two sessions.

BACKGROUND KNOWLEDGE REQUIRED BY STUDENTS:
WRITING-Students beginning this unit should already come prepared with a strong background in writing. In my own classroom, this unit follows a unit where students have already explored the Creating Writers' six traits or qualities of good writing as specified by state standards. Students are experienced with the writing process and publishing writing.

DAY ONE: WHAT IS THE DIFFERENCE?

In Class
1) Review the learning from last lesson, Information Sensation, narrowing the topic, conducting research, and creating source cards.

2) Orient students to the current step, taking notes, by questioning them as to what they know already.

3) Use the presentation center and work through the Beacon Learning Center's Web Lesson, Paraphrase Craze or deliver a mini-lesson on taking notes using paraphrasing. {NOTE: Every teacher varies on his or her approach to note taking. Depending upon what the teacher decides to emphasize, certain elements should be contained in the lesson. For example, A) author information and student paraphrase should contain the same message, B) author information is written in student's own words and sentence structure, C) author information is unaltered but credited when quoted, and D) if author information is not credited, then the student is plagiarizing.

4) While working through the Student Web Lesson, require students to take notes on the important steps in the note taking process. Ask students to save these notes, as they need them for tomorrow's session.

5) Review the steps as a whole class in a discussion format.

6) Distribute the Goldfish Fact handout, and place the Goldfish Fact transparency on the overhead.

7) Ask the students to paraphrase this statement on their own papers. Point them to the notes they took on how to paraphrase. Remind them about plagiarism in reports and possible consequences when representing someone else's work as your own. {NOTE: Students will come up with numerous paraphrases because of their nature. Some responses will be simple; some will be complex. Here is an example: Goldfish are orangey fish that live in fresh water. Although they are originally from Asia, they are often found in fish tanks as decorative fish. Here is a non-example: Goldfish are freshwater fish native to Asia. They have a brassy or reddish color. They are bred in many forms as aquarium fish.)

8) After about 5 minutes, discuss students' responses. Ask volunteers to offer their examples for class discussion. {NOTE: If the teacher feels comfortable with this, students can come up to the overhead projector and write out their paraphrases for discussion by the class.}

9) Conclude class by taking up the student paraphrases and reminding students to bring their notes back to class for tomorrow's session. Also, ask students to bring to class with them a specific subject area textbook, for example, ask them to bring in their social studies book OR you, the teacher, can duplicate a page from a source relating to the research theme and distribute copies to each student at the beginning of tomorrow's session.

Teacher
1) Review student work for understanding of paraphrase concept. Note the names of students that encountered problems. Observe these students during tomorrow's session to make certain they finally achieve understanding. If same students still encounter problems with paraphrasing, provide an additional assignment to practice the concept.

DAY TWO: WORDS FOR THE WISE

In Class
1) Review learning from yesterday's session on taking notes.

2) Direct students to use their own paper for the following assignment. Also, ask them to use their notes from yesterday's session. These notes remind them of the correct steps in paraphrasing. Ask them to use a specific subject area textbook OR you, the teacher, can duplicate a page from a source relating to the research theme and distribute copies to each student. Deliver assignment.

3) ASSIGNMENT: {NOTE: For this assignment, I made photocopies from a source the students might use for their research, however, using a subject area textbook works just as well.} Assign students to read a specific paragraph from the photocopy of the source. After students have read the paragraph, ask them to paraphrase the paragraph. Remind students to review their notes if they are confused or encounter any questions.

4) After enough time has passed, ask volunteers to share their results with the class. This is a strong use of feedback because students hear the different ways that a paraphrase can represent the original text. Some students provide a simple paraphrase while others provide a complex version. Clarify any misconceptions or problems students encounter.

5) Ask students to paraphrase a second paragraph from the source. Again, use volunteers to demonstrate possible responses. This time pay close attention to the students that had problems with the first attempt. If these students are still struggling, provide them with further practice for homework.

6) Next, describe the use of note cards to compile information for the report. The teacher needs to decide an acceptable format for the students. {NOTE: I have students read the text and paraphrase it on their card. In this way, the student is never in danger of plagiarism. The exception to this rule is when a student wants to quote the source to use as a supporting detail in the paper. If that is the case, and students are unfamiliar with quoting and the use of quotation marks, the teacher may need to extend this lesson by one session for further instruction.}

7) Distribute the Note Card Format handout, and display the Note Card Format transparency on the overhead projector.

8) Point to and explain the reason for each element required on the card. For example, the broad topic and the narrow topic show how the paper is progressing through the research process. The source card number shows the student the relationship between the notes and the sources. It also requires the student to keep organized source cards. This entire process builds upon each step. Describe the relationship between the source cards, the note cards, and writing the paper itself.

9) Ask students to paraphrase a third paragraph from the source handout. This time, they should record their paraphrase on the note card.

10) After a few minutes have passed, ask volunteers to share their responses. Clarify any misconceptions or problems students encounter.

11) Conclude class with a review of the learning achieved during the lesson.

Teacher
1) Observe students during the paraphrasing practice to make certain they understand. If some students are struggling with the concept, provide them with further practice for homework. Continue providing direction through differentiation of instruction.

Assessments

For this activity, formatively assess the collection of the note cards. Check the note cards for the following: Name, date, source card number, and an appropriate paraphrase that include elements from instruction. I have found in my own instruction, that whatever the content, these criteria should be present. The elements required for a true paraphrase are 1) author information and student paraphrase should contain the same message, 2) author information is written in student's own words and sentence structure, 3) author information is unaltered but credited when quoted, and 4) if author information is not credited, then the student is plagiarizing. {NOTE: Feel free to add more criteria to this list as you formatively assess the students' learning and attempt to modify instruction based on their needs. For example, for students in need of more concrete examples, perhaps require certain key words be present from the content they are paraphrasing. This demonstrates true understanding of the content and the characteristics of paraphrasing.} Further formative assessments occur in this area as the unit progresses. Summative assessment falls at the conclusion of the unit, Info Expo.

Extensions

A) The Beacon Unit Plan associated with this lesson can be viewed by clicking on the link located at the top of this page or by using the following URL: http://www.beaconlearningcenter.com/search/details.asp?item=2964. Once you select the unitís link, scroll to the bottom of the unit plan page to find the section, Associated Files. This section contains links to the Unit Plan Overview, Diagnostic and Summative Assessments, and other associated files (if any).

B) Try having students paraphrase various forms of literature in modern language. For example, have them paraphrase Romeo and Juliet done in modern slang.

C) To integrate the subject areas with this lesson, work with a teacher in the science or social studies area and supplement their units by focusing the research of this lesson to their needs.

Web Links

Use this interactive Student Web Lesson to assist students.
Paraphrase Craze

Attached Files

This file contains the goldfish fact and note card format.†††††File Extension: pdf

Return to the Beacon Lesson Plan Library.