Beacon Lesson Plan Library

Take a Plane or a Train

Sandi King
Bay District Schools

Description

Is there more to learn about transportation? Through this literature-based lesson, students review rhyming words, that different things move at different speeds, and vocabulary as they explore transportation.

Objectives

The student understands the concept of words and constructs meaning from shared text, illustrations, graphics, and charts.

The student understands basic phonetic principles (for example, knows rhyming words; knows words that have the same initial and final sounds; knows which sound is in the beginning, middle, end of a word; blends individual sounds into words).

The student identifies frequently used words.

The student creates and acts out number stories using objects.

The student understands that different things move at different speeds (bicycle/motorcycle, car/plane, tortoise/hare)

The student understands basic modes of transportation (for example, walking, riding animals, various kinds of animal-drawn wagons, boats, trains, bicycles, cars, airplanes, space shuttles).

The student listens to, views, and discusses stories and other media about modes of transportation used to move people, products, and ideas from place to place, their importance, and their advantages and disadvantages.

Materials

- Baer, Edith. [This Is the Way We Go to School]. New York. Scholastic. 1990.
- Hill, Lee Sullivan. [Get Around In The City]. Minneapolis. Carolrhoda Books. 1999.
- Vocabulary and matching picture cards (from the associated file to the lesson plan, How Do You Get To School?)
- Additional vocabulary and matching picture cards (from associated files)
- A low bulletin board that students can reach
- Previously used teacher made chart of the song, “The Wheels on the Bus”
- Six sticky notes with the word bike written on them
- Two sticky notes with rider written on them
- Two sticky notes with bell on written them
- Four sticky notes with here written on them
- Four sticky notes with I written on them
- Four sticky notes with come written on them
- Twelve sticky notes with ding written on them
- Chalk/dry erase board or chart paper
- Three large markers, black for writing and read and blue for the rhyming activity
- Previously used Formative Assessment Checklists for each student
- Centers

Preparations

1. Locate and preview the book [This Is the Way We Go to School]. This book will be used daily throughout the unit and is a core teaching tool.
2. Locate and preview the book [Get Around In The City]. If this book cannot be located, use any book depicting a wide variety of modes of transportation used for a variety of purposes.
3. Have available the vocabulary and matching picture cards from the associated file to the lesson plan, How Do You Get To School?
4. Download and print the additional vocabulary words and matching pictures from the associated file.
5. Continue use of a low bulletin board.
6. Locate a chalk/dry erase board or large piece of chart paper for writing rhyming words.
7. Locate large markers (or colored chalk) of three colors, black for writing and red and blue for the rhyming activity.
8. Post the previously used teacher made chart of the song, “The Wheels on the Bus.”
9. Write bike on six sticky notes.
10. Write rider on two sticky notes.
11. Write bell on two sticky notes.
12. Write ding on twelve sticky notes.
13. Write here on four sticky notes.
14. Write I on four sticky notes.
15. Write come on four sticky notes.
16. Locate the Formative Assessment Checklists used previously.
17. Continue round one of centers as described in the center information in the unit’s associated files.

Procedures

Note: This is lesson three of seven for the Beacon Learning Center unit, Going to Grandma’s. A link to the unit is available in the top right corner of this online lesson.

This lesson reviews the seven standards previously taught in lessons one and two of this unit.

Session 1 - Language Arts:

1. Gain students’ attention by singing the song, “The Wheels on the Bus.” Invite students to sing along. Point to the words on the chart as you sing. Suggest that the song be sung about a different kind of transportation. Cover bus on the chart with sticky notes that have bike written on them.

2. Ask if there are any other words that need to be changed now that you will be singing about a bike. Guide the students to suggest changing driver to rider, move on back to here I come, horn to bell, and beep to ding.

3. As this activity progresses, formatively assess students as to their ability to identify frequently used words and to construct meaning from the text and chart. Give affirmative and corrective feedback and mark the Formative Assessment Checklist.

4. Now sing the song using the new bike related words. Point to the words as you sing. This song can also be sung anytime during the day that songs are normally included such as transitions between areas, during outside play, etc.
Session 2 - Language Arts:

5. Show the book [This Is the Way We Go to School]. Ask students if they remember what the book is about. Affirm that the book is about how children get to school and about transportation.

6. Ask if the students remember anything special about the way some of the words sound. Encourage students to explain that the book has rhyming words.

7. Give a mini-review on rhyming words using the rhyming lists created by the class in yesterday’s lesson.

8. Review why a red circle is around the beginning of the words. Reinforce that only the beginning sounds of rhyming words can be different. Red circle means it is different.

9. Review why a blue box is around the middle and ending of the words. Emphasize that the middle and ending sounds must match if the words rhyme.

10. Ask students for other words they know that rhyme with the words in the lists. Focus on one list at a time and only add about two words to each list. This will allow for more words to be added in the future.

11. When a word is suggested, say the new word and the words already listed. Say them together several times. Ask students to listen carefully for rhyming sound. Emphasize that the middle and ending sounds must match if the words rhyme. Ask for thumbs up or thumbs down signal as to whether the new word rhymes with the others and should be added to the list. Write any appropriate words in the list.

12. Using red, circle the beginning sound of each new word added to the list. As you are circling, remind students that the beginning sound is the only thing that can be different in rhyming words.

13. Using blue, draw a box around the rhyming sound of each new word added to the list. Remind students that the middle and ending sound must match the others if this is a rhyming word.

14. Emphasize the rhyming sounds of all the words in the list as you touch each box. This helps tune the students listening to the rhyming sound.

15. Ask students to listen for rhyming words as you read aloud the book [This Is the Way We Go to School].

16. While reading the story, ask comprehension questions concerning words that the student may not have known before being introduced to this story. Encourage students to explain the meanings of the words from the shared text and illustrations. For example, ask about the word “plain” and guide students to use the illustration to understand that the word must mean they are in the flat land.

17. As the activity progresses, formatively assess students as to their ability to understand the concept of words and to construct meaning of words from shared text and illustrations. Can they discuss the text using illustrations and context clues? Can they explain how they know what new words mean? Also, formatively assess students’ ability to understand the basic phonetic principle of rhyming words. Can they identify rhyming words? Can they explain what can be different and what must be the same if the words rhyme? Can they explain how they know if the words rhyme?

18. Give both affirmative and corrective feedback. The purpose of formative feedback is to tell the students why they are right (affirmative) or to guide them towards the correct answer (corrective). Mark the Formative Assessment Checklist.

19. As you use the Formative Assessment Checklist, check to make sure that all students are receiving equal opportunity to contribute to discussions and answer questions. Don’t allow a few students to dominate.

Session 3 - Social Studies, Science, Language Arts:


20. Review the definition of transportation as movement of people, products, or ideas from one place to another.

21. Call on individual students to read the vocabulary words on display on the bulletin board. Point to the word, but allow them to use the matching picture as a clue.

22. Hold the stack of new vocabulary words from the associated file. These words will be used in the summative assessments and therefore learning them is important for students in order to demonstrate mastery of identifying words.

23. Tell students that you know of some other modes of transportation that are not in [This Is the Way We Go to School]. Show a word card from your stack. Ask if anyone can read the word. If necessary, give phonemic clues such as look at how the word begins and how it ends. If the word is not successfully read, place it face down in a pile and continue to the next word. If the word is successfully read, show the picture that matches the word.

24. To encourage use of phonic skills, discuss any clues the students can use to remember the word.

25. Ask where on the bulletin board the new word should be placed in order to maintain the hierarchy of speed. Place the word and picture in the place that is decided to be appropriate.

26. After all words that can be read have been placed on the bulletin board, go through the unread word pile again quickly. If words are read, add them to the bulletin board.

27. If any words remain unread, place the unread words and matching pictures in random order in a pocket chart or other location where they can be seen by the class. Call on a student to identify each picture.

28. Call on a student to match a word with a picture. This process encourages students to make meaning of a word from an illustration.

29. As the words are identified, discuss their speed, and place them in the appropriate place on the bulletin board.

* Teacher Note: Three modes for transporting ideas have been added, phone, computer, and mail. It is important to stress that the radio, phone, computer, and mail are not forms of transportation, but rather the way we receive ideas that have been transported through radio waves, phone lines, the Internet, and a multitude of different kinds of transportation to transport mail. Radio will remain fastest, then telephone, computer, and mail. The explanation is as follows:

* Radios are not transportation, but rather the radio waves that carry ideas (words) are the transportation. Radios receive the ideas after they have been transported. Radio waves travel at the speed of light, 186,000 miles per second (mps), which is much faster than the speed of sound, which is 760 mps.

* Likewise, it is not the phone that is a form of transportation, but rather the phone lines. Ideas (words) are transported to the phone where they are received. Although phone lines convert the sound to signals, which are then carried electrically, the signals are still much slower than radio waves.

* Computers operate through servers that join together to form the Internet. All ideas that are sent, whether via email, messengers, chat, or Web pages must travel through a network of servers before finally being received, so although the Internet signals travel electrically as do phone signals, the routing makes them slower.

* Mail is the slowest mode of transportation being used as an example since a letter is put in a box where it sits until it is picked up from the box, carried by car, truck, or van to a post office where it is processed through the post office, sent to another location, processed again through the new post office, carried by the mailman to your home mailbox where it sits until it is picked up by someone in your family.

30. As the activity progresses, formatively assess students as to their ability to identify the words. Can they read the words? Can they locate a word that someone else has read? Also, formatively assess students as to their ability to understand that different things move at different speeds. Can they discuss the speeds of different modes of transportation? Can they place the various words and pictures in appropriate places on the display? Give affirmative and corrective feedback. Mark the Formative Assessment Checklist.

31. Show students the book [Get Around In The City]. Ask students to specifically look for modes of transportation that have not been in any of the other books read as a class as you take a picture walk through the book.

32. The purpose of the picture walk is to discuss modes of transportation, whether they are used to move people, products (cargo), and/or ideas, their importance, advantages (a good about it), and disadvantages (a bad about it). This is a review of what was introduced yesterday.

33. On the first few pages of the book, ask students to name the mode of transportation. Then, you model telling what the transportation carries, why it is important, and its advantages and disadvantages.

34. After you have modeled this procedure several times, begin to have students fill in the information as to what is carried, why it is important, and its advantages and disadvantages. Call on as many students as possible while this discussion is progressing. Check the Formative Assessment Checklist to see who has not yet mastered these standards and focus on giving opportunity and assistance to these individuals.

35. As the activity progresses, formatively assess students as to their ability to understand basic modes of transportation and to discuss modes of transportation used to move people, products, and ideas from place to place, their importance, and their advantages and disadvantages.
· Can they identify modes of transportation?
· Can they discuss what is being transported?
· Can they discuss advantages such as how fast the mode moves or how much it carries?
· Can they discuss disadvantages such as lack of tracks or lack of drivers?
· Can they discuss importance such as boats are important for transporting across water because they float?
Give affirmative and corrective feedback. Mark the Formative Assessment Checklist.

36. When the picture walk is complete, remind students that they have seen a lot of different kinds of transportation in the book. Wonder out loud as to how fast the different modes of transportation are, comparing them to the speed of a car.

37. Read the book. As you read, ask students to classify each mode of transportation as to whether it is faster or slower than a car.

38. Take every opportunity to have students construct meaning of words from the text. When an unfamiliar word or phrase appears in the text, model using the illustrations to construct meaning. Ask students to discuss the meaning of the word or phrase using the content and illustrations.

39. As the activity progresses, formatively assess students as to their ability to understand that different things move at different speeds and understands meaning of words and constructs meaning from text and illustrations. Ask the students how they know what they are discussing. Listen for an explanation of using the content, text, and/or illustrations to help the student comprehend. Give formative feedback. Mark the Formative Assessment Checklist.

Session 4 - Mathematics:

40. Review the class graph, How I Get To School, created previously.

41. Ask a student to read the transportation words along the left side of the graph. Use this opportunity to review reading the words.

42. Remind students that this graph was made showing how each student came to school on that day. Wonder out loud whether the graph would change if it were to show how each student came to school today.

43. Using your attendance sheet so you don’t miss any students, ask each student how he/she came to school today.

44. If the student came to school the same way as he/she did when the graph was originally constructed, have the student touch the sticky note and verify that it is still in the proper place. If the student came to school using a different mode of transportation, have the student remove his/her sticky note and place it in the proper place according to his/her new mode of transportation. This procedure allows each student to move or verify his/her sticky note encouraging students to take ownership of the graph and allows for movement as they touch or move the notes.

45. Use the new graph to demonstrate how to tell math stories. For example, tell this story, “Some of our students changed the way they came to school. How many people changed the way they came to school?” To act out the story, have all the students stand. Next, ask students who kept their sticky note name in the same line on the graph to sit down. Count the students still standing. Then, end the story by saying, “(appropriate number) of students came to school a different way today than they did two days ago.”

46. After you have modeled using the graph to tell math stories and how students can be the objects acting out the stories, ask volunteers to tell math stories. After each story is told, select students to act out the story.

47. As the activity progresses, formatively assess students as to their ability to create and act out number stories using objects. Can they create a number story? Can they act it out? Give formative feedback. Mark the Formative Assessment Checklist.

Session 5 - Centers – Round 1, Day 3 of 5:
Group the students into five groups. Each group participates in one center per day for five days. Explanations of the various centers are available from the unit’s associated files.

Session 6 - Outdoor Activity:
During outdoor play, review that different objects move at different speeds. Ask students to look for the slowest thing on the playground. They may relate movement such as a student going down the slide or an ant walking in the dirt, etc. Give formative feedback to reinforce the concept of speed of objects.

Assessments

Formative assessments of the identified standards will be conducted as described in the procedures. Results of the formative assessment are recorded on the Formative Assessment Checklist from the unit’s associated files. For a link to the unit see the top right corner of this lesson plan or the extensions section for the URL.

Assess students as to their ability to understand the basic phonetic principle of rhyming words. Could they tell you which words rhyme? Did they understand that the rhyming sounds come from the middle and end of the words and that the beginning sounds can be different? Could they recognize rhyming words?

Assess students as to their ability to discuss whether modes of transportation are used to move people, products, or ideas from place to place, their importance, and their advantages and disadvantages. Can they tell what is good and/or bad about each mode of transportation? Can they tell why it is important? Can they tell what is moved by the transportation?

Assess students as to their ability to understand that different things move at different speeds. Can they tell which objects are slower and faster?

Assess students as to their ability to understand basic modes of transportation. Can they identify which objects are modes of transportation?

Assess students as to their ability to understand the concept of words and to construct meaning of words from shared text and illustrations. Do they use the text to make meaning of words? Do they use the illustrations to make meaning of words? Do the context of the words and the illustrations aid in comprehension?

Assess students as to their ability to identify frequently used words. Can the student read words after they have been presented? Can the student locate the word in a passage or from the bulletin board?

Assess students as to their ability to create and act out number stories using objects. Can they tell a number story? Do they use the objects to act out the story?

Extensions

1. The Beacon Unit Plan associated with this lesson can be viewed by clicking on the link located at the top of this page or by using the following URL: http://www.beaconlearningcenter.com/search/details.asp?item=3852. Once you select the unit’s link, scroll to the bottom of the unit plan page to find the section, “Associated Files.” This section contains links to the Unit Plan Overview, Diagnostic and Summative Assessments, and other associated files, (if any).
2. The graphing activity can easily be extended to include, The student interprets data exhibited in concrete or pictorial graphs.
3. Any of these activities can be modified to accommodate whole groups or small groups.
4. ESOL students may need a peer tutor to assist in translations.
5. The list of vocabulary may be sent home for parental assistance in learning the words.
6. All sessions of this lesson can be adapted to whole group or small group to meet the needs of individual classes.
7. See the Effective Reading Instructions document from the unit plan's associated files for a correlation between strategies from this lesson and effective reading instruction.

Web Links

Students interact with rhyming words as they use this poem to explore various modes of transportation children use to visit their grandmas. Audio is available for this online book.
A Visit With Grandma

Learn more about the types of questions to ask students to promote higher levels of learning.
Bloom’s Taxonomy Questioning

Attached Files

Additional transportation vocabulary words and pictures     File Extension: pdf

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