Beacon Lesson Plan Library

Pilots, Drivers, and Captains

Sandi King
Bay District Schools

Description

Who makes the transportation go? Through this literature-based lesson, students review rhyming words, that different things move at different speeds, and vocabulary as they explore transportation and transportation related jobs.

Objectives

The student understands the concept of words and constructs meaning from shared text, illustrations, graphics, and charts.

The student understands basic phonetic principles (for example, knows rhyming words; knows words that have the same initial and final sounds; knows which sound is in the beginning, middle, end of a word; blends individual sounds into words).

The student identifies frequently used words.

The student creates and acts out number stories using objects.

The student understands that different things move at different speeds (bicycle/motorcycle, car/plane, tortoise/hare)

The student knows the names of objects that roll, slide, or fly.

The student knows that the motion of an object (for example, toy truck, toy car, ball, marble) can be changed by a push or a pull.

The student understands basic modes of transportation (for example, walking, riding animals, various kinds of animal-drawn wagons, boats, trains, bicycles, cars, airplanes, space shuttles).

The student listens to, views, and discusses stories and other media about modes of transportation used to move people, products, and ideas from place to place, their importance, and their advantages and disadvantages.

The student knows simple descriptions of work and jobs that people do.

Materials

- Beacon Online Story, [A Visit With Grandma] (see Weblinks)
- Computer with Internet connectivity
- A display devise to display the monitor on the computer large enough for whole group viewing of words and illustrations (big screen television, projector, LCD panel, etc.)
- Computer speakers
- Hill, Lee Sullivan. [Get Around With Cargo]. Minneapolis. Carolrhoda Books. 1999
- One set of transportation picture cards (from associated file)
- Vocabulary and matching picture cards previously used
- A low bulletin board for student use
- Previously used teacher made chart of the song, “The Wheels on the Bus”
- Six sticky notes with boat written on them
- Two sticky notes with captain written on them
- Four sticky notes with sit written on them
- Four sticky notes with right written on them
- Four sticky notes with down written on them
- Three sticky notes with lake written on them
- Two sticky notes with goes written on them
- Two sticky notes with bottom written on them
- Two sticky notes with of written on them
- Twelve sticky notes with slide written on them
- Twelve sticky notes with honk written on them
- Chalk/dry erase board or chart paper for the rhyming words activity
- Three large markers, black for writing and read and blue for the rhyming activity
- Previously used Formative Assessment Checklists for each student
- One copy of the rhyming pictures and word for the game Silly Rhyming Pictures (from associated file)
- A pocket chart or space on the board or wall for students to display pictures and rhyming words
- One copy of the previously used Summative Assessment #1, Number Stories for each student who has not already completed the assessment
- One copy of Summative Assessment #2, Rhyme As We Go
- One copy of the entire Summative Assessment #3, Transportation
- Student copies of pages 4, 5, and 6 of Summative Assessment #3, Transportation
- Centers

Preparations

1. Preview the Beacon Online Book [A Visit With Grandma]. Since audio will be used during the lesson, it needs to be preloaded to your computer.
2. Locate a means of displaying the computer so that the entire class can view the text and illustrations. This can be a projector, LCD panel, or big screen television. Connect the display devise to the computer to be sure it works.
3. Locate speakers for the computer. Test them to be sure they are working properly. Remember that the audio only works with Internet Explorer as the browser. Netscape does not support the sound.
4. Locate and preview the book [Get Around With Cargo]. If this book cannot be located, use any book depicting a wide variety of modes of transportation. Be sure some carry people and some cargo. Be sure to have some illustrating a push or pull to change an object’s motion.
5. Download and print one set of transportation picture cards from the associated file. Cut the cards apart so only one mode of transportation can be seen at a time.
6. Continue displaying the vocabulary and matching picture cards previously used in this unit.
7. Continue use of a low bulletin board.
8. Locate a chalk/dry erase board or large piece of chart paper for writing rhyming words.
9. Post the previously used teacher made chart of the song, “The Wheels on the Bus.”
10. Locate the Formative Assessment Checklists used previously.
11. Locate the Assessment Records used on the first day of the unit with the diagnostic assessment.
12. Write boat on six sticky notes. Remember that these sticky note words will be covering words on the song chart so should be an appropriate size.
13. Write captain on two sticky notes.
14. Write sit on four sticky notes.
15. Write right on four sticky notes.
16. Write down on four sticky notes.
17. Write lake on three sticky notes.
18. Write goes on two sticky notes.
19. Write bottom on two sticky notes.
20. Write of on two sticky notes.
21. Write slide on twelve sticky notes.
22. Write honk on twelve sticky notes.
23. Download and print one copy of the rhyming pictures and word for the game Silly Rhyming Pictures from associated file.
24. Locate a pocket chart or space on the board or wall for students to display pictures and rhyming words.
25. Dismantle the class graph, How I Get To School, as a new graph will be created today. The students’ name sticky notes should be on display in a line across the bottom of the board or on the wall.
26. Locate one copy of the previously used Summative Assessment #1, Number Stories.
27. Download and print one copy of Summative Assessment #2, Rhyme As We Go.
28. Download and print one copy of the entire Summative Assessment #3, Transportation.
29. Duplicate pages 4, 5, and 6 of Summative Assessment #3, Transportation for each student.
30. Continue round one of centers as described in the center information in the unit’s associated files.

Procedures

Note: This is lesson five of seven for the Beacon Learning Center unit, Going to Grandma’s. A link to the unit is available in the top right corner of this online lesson.

This lesson reviews the nine standards taught previously and adds the final standard for the unit, knows simple descriptions of work and jobs that people do.

Session 1 - Language Arts:

1. Gain students’ attention by singing the song, “The Wheels on the Bus.” Invite students to sing along. Point to the words on the chart as you sing. Suggest that the song be sung about a different kind of transportation. Cover bus on the chart with sticky notes that have boat written on them.

2. Ask if there are any other words that need to be changed now that you will be singing about a boat. Guide the students to suggest changing driver to captain, move on back to sit right down, town to lake, ‘round and ‘round to slide, slide, slide, beep to honk. You are now singing about a boat that slides all through the lake while the captain says to sit right down and the horn honks.

3. As suggested changes are announced, allow a student to identify the word that will be changed on the chart. Call on another student to select the correct sticky note to add to the chart.

4. As this activity progresses, formatively assess students as to their ability to identify frequently used words and to construct meaning from the text and chart. Give affirmative and corrective feedback and mark the Formative Assessment Checklist.

5. Now, sing the song using the new boat related words. Point to the words as you sing. This song can also be sung anytime during the day that songs are normally included such as transitions between areas, during outside play, etc.

Session 2 - Language Arts:

6. Show the online book [A Visit With Grandma]. Tell students that as they listen to the story they should be looking for the rhyming words.

7. Using the audio version, listen to the title, title page, and the first page of the story.

8. After the audio for the first pages has finished, model finding the rhyming words by repeating the verse on this page. This can be done by either reading the page or by clicking the refresh button on your browser to have the audio repeated. Then, focus on the words say and today. Say the two words several times stressing the rhyming sounds. Then, move the mouse cursor over the word say in the story. A yellow box will appear to indicate that it is in fact a rhyming word. Repeat this procedure with the word today. Note – If you click on the rhyming word a box appears showing the two rhyming words together. This feature will be used in future lessons and should not be introduced at this time.

9. Add the words say and today to the rhyming chart from previous lessons in this unit. If the words already appear on the chart, point them out.

10. Ask students what the red circles mean. Reinforce that the red circle stands for the beginning sound that will be different in rhyming words. Use the red marker to circle the s in say and the tod in today.

11. Ask students what the blue boxes mean. Reinforce that the blue boxes show the rhyming sounds in the words. Use the blue marker to make a blue box around the ay rhyming sounds of say and today.

12. Continue with the second page of the online book. Call on students to tell the rhyming words on page two. Select a student to move the mouse cursor over the rhyming word to see if the yellow box comes up that indicates that it is a rhyming word. If you are using the clicking action to show the rhyming pair, this is the appropriate time.

13. Add the rhyming words to the chart and mark the beginning and rhyming sounds appropriately.

14. Complete the online book in this manner.

15. As the activity progresses, formatively assess students as to their ability to understand the basic phonetic principle of rhyming words. Can they locate the rhyming words? Can they identify the beginning sound? Can they identify the rhyming sounds? Give both affirmative and corrective feedback. The purpose of formative feedback is to tell the student why they are right (affirmative) or to guide them towards the correct answer (corrective). Mark the Formative Assessment Checklist.

16. As you use the Formative Assessment Checklist, check to make sure that all students are receiving equal opportunity to contribute to discussions and answer questions. Don’t allow a few students to dominate.

17. To further extend students’ understanding of rhyming words and using illustrations to construct meaning of words, play the Silly Rhyming Pictures game. Words and illustrations needed for this game are available from the associated file.

18. Display all ten of the words that go with the game on the board or in a pocket chart. Don’t read the words. Explain to the students that you are going to show them a silly picture. The objects or actions in the picture rhyme. It will be the students’ job to look at the picture and find the rhyming objects or actions in the picture. Students are to raise their hands when they think they have the rhyming words for each picture.

19. Model how to play the game by holding up the picture of the hog. Say the word pig several times while attempting to match the picture to the word pig. Since there is no word available that begins with a p sound, think out loud as to what else the animal could be called. State that another name for a pig is a hog. Say the word hog aloud while trying to match it to the words. When the word hog is found, move it to a different pocket in the chart, or a different place on the board.

20. Again, think out loud as you try to find the word that rhymes with hog reminding students that the beginning will be different but the middle and end will match. Point to the og in hog and think out loud that you must find a word that ends in og.

21. Search the words until the word jog is found. Say hog and jog a couple of times stressing the rhyming sound. Look again at the silly picture and model checking it to see if hog and jog are both in the picture. Confirm that the hog could be jogging, so hog and jog do match the silly picture.

22. Now that the picture and both rhyming words have been selected, display the three together as a set in the pocket chart or on the board or wall.

23. Students now play the game.

24. Show one picture.

25. Remind students that the words on display are the only words that they may use to match the pictures. This forces students to use the illustrations to read words and use the words to help them make sense of the illustration.

26. When a student figures out the two rhyming words that match the picture, have the student place the two words and picture together as a set. Be sure to have the students explain how they figured out the silly rhyming pictures. They should verbalize the process you just modeled. It will be necessary for you to prompt students to share their thinking process aloud.

27. If students get stumped on a picture, give a hint to spur thinking, like you gave yourself when you realized the word pig was not an option.

28. This activity should generate a group discussion as students attempt to figure out the silly rhyming pictures. Students learn through discussion with peers so encourage this type of learning interaction.

29. Make sure that all students are receiving equal opportunity to contribute to discussions and answer questions. Don’t allow a few students to dominate.

30. As the activity progresses, formatively assess students as to their ability to understand the basic phonetic principle of rhyming words. Can they locate the rhyming words? Can they identify the beginning sound? Can they identify the rhyming sounds? Can they make sense of the rhyming words? Mark the Formative Assessment Checklist.

31. Formatively assess students as to their ability to understand the concept of words and construct meaning using illustrations. Can they use the picture to figure out the possible rhyming words? Can they use the rhyming words to construct meaning of the illustration? Can they select logical matches?

32. Some of your students will now be ready for Summative Assessment #2, Rhyme As We Go. Since this is an individually administered assessment, it may take several days to complete. Center time may be the best opportunity to call students to you to administer the assessment. The assessment is available from the unit’s associated files.

Session 3 - Social Studies, Science, Language Arts:

33. Review the definition of transportation as movement of people, products, or ideas from one place to another.

34. Review the movements of slide, roll, fly, and step by asking individuals to read the column headings. As the word is read, ask what that word means. Ask for demonstrations that show what the word means.

35. All of the transportation words and pictures should have been removed from the bulletin board. Tell the students that they will be reading the transportation words and putting them back in the column that shows how they move from one place to another.

36. Model the process for the students. Pick a word from the stack of vocabulary words. Then, show the word to the students and read the word. Finally, state the type movement of the selected transportation and explain how you know. An example might be: This word says helicopter. I know that a helicopter flies because when it is moving it does not touch the ground. Place the word in the correct column on the bulletin board.

37. After you have modeled the procedure, call on students to select a word, read it, tell about the type of movement and place it in the correct column on the bulletin board. Give affirmative and corrective feedback.

38. Continue until all of the transportation words have been placed. After everyone has had a turn, consult your Formative Assessment Checklist and select students who need further assistance with these standards until all the words have been returned to the bulletin board.

39. As the activity progresses, formatively assess students as to their ability to identify the words, understand basic modes of transportation, and to name objects that slide, roll, and fly. Mark the Formative Assessment Checklist.

40. Show students the book [Get Around With Cargo]. Ask students to specifically look for modes of transportation that have not been in any of the other books read as a class as you take a picture walk through the book. Since this book is about transporting cargo, a variety of modes of transportation is shown.

41. The purpose of the picture walk is to review modes of transportation, whether they are used to move people, products (cargo), and/or ideas, their importance, advantages (a good about it), and disadvantages (a bad about it) and to introduce the new idea of work and job responsibilities on the transportation.

42. Showing the cover of the book, ask students to name the mode of transportation. Then, you model telling what the transportation carries, why it is important, and its advantages and disadvantages.

43. Since you are now adding transportation related jobs to the discussion, talk about the main people that make the transportation work and what they have to do to make the transportation move correctly. Use the train on the cover of the book as you model discussing workers that make the train run correctly. The engineer is in charge of making sure the train is moving correctly even though the train moves on tracks and isn’t actually steered. The engineer is in the first car of the train, the engine, and controls how fast the train moves. The engineer controls whether the train goes forward or backward, blows the horn to alert people or animals that the train in coming near, and talks on the radio to the people at the train station to let them know where the train is and when it will be finishing its trip. Other people that work on trains are the people who load the cargo, the people who keep the tracks clean and smooth, and the people who make the schedules that tell the trains where to go and when to go.

44. Model this same procedure with the camel and cart on the title page and the boat on the next page.

45. After you have modeled these procedures several times, begin to have students fill in the information as to what the transportation is called, what is carried, why it is important, its advantages and disadvantages, who is working on the transportation, and what is done in the job. Call on as many students as possible while this discussion is progressing.

46. On page 9 of the book, boys are pushing bikes loaded with cargo. At this point remind students that the motion of an object can be changed by using a push or a pull. Remind students of the push and pull demonstrations shown yesterday. Demonstrate pushing and pulling objects in the classroom as a reminder of these actions. Points to review are: Push is from the back and pull is from the front. Some things can be pushed but not pulled. Some things can be pulled but not pushed. Some things can be pushed and pulled. Remember to use the push pull wording whenever possible in daily classroom activities such as: push your chair in, pull the box of crayons over in front of you, push your coat into your cubbie, pull the papers out of your backpack. When a student is asked to perform a push or pull, give formative feedback and indicate the understanding on the Formative Assessment Checklist.

47. Ask if the boys are pushing or pulling their bikes on page 9. Allow for discussion. Guide students to the consensus that the bikes are being pushed since the boys are behind the handlebars. If they were pulling, the boys would have to be in front of their bikes.

48. Discuss changing the movement of objects by using a push or a pull anytime an example is presented in the book. Possible examples are the rope and llama on page 10, the cart on page 11, the barge on page 15, the train on page 16, and the horse on page 23.

49. As the activity progresses, formatively assess students as to their ability to understand basic modes of transportation and to discuss modes of transportation used to move people, products, and ideas from place to place, their importance, and their advantages and disadvantages. Can they identify modes of transportation? Can they discuss what is being transported? Can they discuss advantages such as how fast the mode moves or how much it carries? Can they discuss disadvantages such as lack of tracks or lack of drivers? Can they discuss importance such as boats are important for transporting across water because they float.

50. Formatively assess students as to their ability to know that the motion of an object can be changed by a push or a pull. Can students tell how they know an object was pushed or pulled? Can they explain movement of objects using the words push and pull?

51. Also, formatively assessing whether students know simple descriptions of work and jobs that people do. Do they know what the job is called? Do they have an idea of what is done in the job? Remember that the standard states that they know simple descriptions, so great detail is not necessary; however, details should be correct. Give affirmative and corrective feedback. Mark the Formative Assessment Checklist.

52. Check the Formative Assessment Checklist to see who has not yet mastered these standards and focus on giving opportunity and assistance to these individuals.

53. When the picture walk is complete, remind students that they have seen a lot of different kinds of transportation in the book. Wonder out loud as to how fast the different modes of transportation are, comparing them to the speed of a car and whether the transportation moves by sliding, flying, rolling, or stepping.

54. Read the book. As you read, ask students to classify each mode of transportation as to how it moves and whether it is faster or slower than a car.

55. Take every opportunity to have students construct meaning of words from the text. When an unfamiliar word or phrase appears in the text, model using the illustrations to construct meaning. Ask students to discuss the meaning of the word or phrase using the content and illustrations.

56. As the activity progresses, formatively assess students as to their ability to understand that different things move at different speeds, whether they can name things that roll, slide, or fly, and understands meaning of words and constructs meaning from text and illustrations. Ask the students how they know what they are discussing. Listen for an explanation of using the content, text, and/or illustrations to help the student comprehend. Give formative feedback. Mark the Formative Assessment Checklist.

57. Since individual students must be able to master each standard, it is important to formatively assess each student’s ability. Use the transportation cards from the associated file to have students name objects that slide, roll, or fly. Remember that the standard states that the student must name the object, so show a student one card and have him/her name the object and then tell whether it slides, rolls, or flies. This activity can be conducted throughout the day in individual conferences. Be sure to mark the Formative Assessment Checklist and to give affirmative and corrective feedback.

58. Begin Summative Assessment #3, Transportation. Since this is an individually administered assessment, it will take several days to complete. Begin with those students who you believe will show mastery of the standards at this time. This will give additional review and instruction to those needing it as the unit progresses. This also allows for the best use of your time. The assessment is available from the unit’s associated files.

Session 4 - Mathematics:

59. The class graph, How I Get To School, should have been dismantled as a new graph will be created today. The students’ name sticky notes should be on display in a line across the bottom of the board or on the wall.

60. Write the graph title, Going to Grandma’s, on the board.

61. Ask students to think about their favorite grandma. Think about the last time they visited with their favorite grandmas at Grandma’s house. Now, think about what transportation the students used to visit. Stress that you want to know how the students got to Grandma’s. Tomorrow we will reverse the scenario and show how their grandma visited with the students.

62. Using your attendance sheet so you don’t miss any students, ask each student what transportation was used the last time he/she visited Grandma.

63. As each student responds, write the mode of transportation in a column on the left of the graph and have the student move his or her name sticky note to the graph.

64. If the mode of transportation already appears on the graph, the student adds his/her sticky note to the appropriate place.

65. When the graph is complete, call on students to read the words along the left of the graph.

66. Use the new graph to demonstrate how to tell math stories. For example, tell this story: “Some of our students visited grandma using transportation that slides. How many of our students visited grandma using transportation that slides?” To act out the story, discuss which modes of transportation on the graph move by sliding. Possible answers may be in a boat, talking on the phone, or sending an email. Have students who used a mode of transportation that moves by sliding the last time they visited grandma to stand up. Then end the story by saying, “(appropriate number) of students last visited their grandma using a transportation that slides.”

67. After you have modeled using the graph to tell math stories and how students can be the objects acting out the stories, ask volunteers to tell math stories. After each story is told, select students to act out the story.

68. As the activity progresses, formatively assess students as to their ability to create and act out number stories using objects. Can they create a number story? Can they act it out? Give formative feedback. Mark the Formative Assessment Checklist.

69. Continue using Summative Assessment #1, Number Stories for those students ready for this summative assessment. Since this is an individually administered assessment, during center time may be the best opportunity to call students to you to administer the assessment.

Session 5 - Centers – Round 1, Day 5 of 5:
Group the students into five groups. Each group participates in one center per day for five days. Explanations of the various centers are available from the unit’s associated files.

Session 6 - Outdoor Activity:
During outdoor play, have students slide down a slide, roll a ball, and fly in a swing. This can be done as a follow the leader activity. Give formative feedback to reinforce the concept of movement as roll, slide, and fly.

Assessments

Continue Summative Assessment #1, Number Stories. The assessment tool and all instructions are available from the unit’s associated files. This assessment must be given one-on-one.

Begin Summative Assessment #2, Rhyme As We Go. The assessment tools and all instructions are available from the unit’s associated files. This assessment must be given one-on-one.

Begin Summative Assessment #3, Transportation. The assessment tools and all instructions are available from the unit’s associated files. Parts of this assessment can be given small or whole group; however, the conferencing section must be given one-on-one.

Formative assessments of the identified standards will be conducted as described in the procedures. Results of the formative assessment are recorded on the Formative Assessment Checklist from the unit’s associated files. For a link to the unit see the top right corner of this lesson plan or the extensions section for the URL.

Assess students as to their ability to know simple descriptions of work and jobs that people do. Can the students name various jobs that relate to transportation such as a driver, pilot, farmer, astronaut, etc.? Can the student give a simple description of what the worker might do in the job? Remember that the standard specifically says that students know a simple description, so only a general description with few details is adequate as long as the description is accurate.

Assess students as to their ability to know the names of objects that roll, slide, or fly. Can the student name the object? Can the student demonstrate knowledge of the meaning of the words slide, roll, and fly?

Assess students as to their ability to know that the motion of an object can be changed by a push or a pull. Do students know the difference in a push and a pull? Can students demonstrate a push or pull? Can students discuss how objects are moved using a push and/or pull?

Assess students as to their ability to understand the basic phonetic principle of rhyming words. Could they tell you which words rhyme? Did they understand that the rhyming sounds come from the middle and end of the words and that the beginning sounds can be different? Could they recognize rhyming words?

Assess students as to their ability to discuss whether modes of transportation are used to move people, products, or ideas from place to place, their importance, and their advantages and disadvantages. Can they tell what is good and/or bad about each mode of transportation? Can they tell why it is important? Can they tell what is moved by the transportation?

Assess students as to their ability to understand that different things move at different speeds. Can they tell which objects are slower and faster?

Assess students as to their ability to understand basic modes of transportation. Can they identify which objects are modes of transportation?

Assess students as to their ability to understand the concept of words and to construct meaning of words from shared text and illustrations. Do they use the text to make meaning of words? Do they use the illustrations to make meaning of words? Do the context of the words and the illustrations aid in comprehension?

Assess students as to their ability to identify frequently used words. Can the student read words after they have been presented? Can the student locate the word in a passage or from the bulletin board?

Assess students as to their ability to create and act out number stories using objects. Can they tell a number story? Do they use the objects to act out the story?

Extensions

1. The Beacon Unit Plan associated with this lesson can be viewed by clicking on the link located at the top of this page or by using the following URL: http://www.beaconlearningcenter.com/search/details.asp?item=3852. Once you select the unit’s link, scroll to the bottom of the unit plan page to find the section, “Associated Files.” This section contains links to the Unit Plan Overview, Diagnostic and Summative Assessments, and other associated files, (if any).
2. The graphing activity can easily be extended to include, the student interprets data exhibited in concrete or pictorial graphs. Allow students to interpret data exhibited such as: Which modes of transportation have wheels? Which modes of transportation move by flying?
3. Any of these activities can be modified to accommodate whole groups or small groups.
4. ESOL students may need a peer tutor to assist in translations.
5. The list of vocabulary may be sent home for parental assistance in learning the words.
6. All sessions of this lesson can be adapted to whole group or small group to meet the needs of individual classes.
7. See the Effective Reading Instructions document from the unit plan's associated files for a correlation between strategies from this lesson and effective reading instruction.

Web Links

Students interact with rhyming words as they use this poem to explore various modes of transportation children use to visit their grandmas. Audio is available for this online book.
A Visit With Grandma

Attached Files

Word and picture cards for the Silly Rhyming Pictures activity     File Extension: pdf

Picture cards for modes of transportation     File Extension: pdf

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