Beacon Lesson Plan Library

Jobs, Jobs, Jobs

Sandi King
Bay District Schools

Description

Have you wondered how many workers are needed to move people and cargo? Through this literature-based lesson, students review rhyming words, that different things move at different speeds, and vocabulary as they explore transportation and transportation related jobs.

Objectives

The student understands the concept of words and constructs meaning from shared text, illustrations, graphics, and charts.

The student understands basic phonetic principles (for example, knows rhyming words; knows words that have the same initial and final sounds; knows which sound is in the beginning, middle, end of a word; blends individual sounds into words).

The student identifies frequently used words.

The student creates and acts out number stories using objects.

The student understands that different things move at different speeds (bicycle/motorcycle, car/plane, tortoise/hare)

The student knows the names of objects that roll, slide, or fly.

The student knows that the motion of an object (for example, toy truck, toy car, ball, marble) can be changed by a push or a pull.

The student understands basic modes of transportation (for example, walking, riding animals, various kinds of animal-drawn wagons, boats, trains, bicycles, cars, airplanes, space shuttles).

The student listens to, views, and discusses stories and other media about modes of transportation used to move people, products, and ideas from place to place, their importance, and their advantages and disadvantages.

The student knows simple descriptions of work and jobs that people do.

Materials

- Beacon Online Story, [A Visit With Grandma] (see Weblinks)
- Computer with Internet connectivity
- A display devise to display the monitor on the computer large enough for whole group viewing of words and illustrations (big screen television, projector, LCD panel, etc.)
- Computer speakers
- Hill, Lee Sullivan. [Get Around in Air and Space]. Minneapolis. Carolrhoda Books. 2000.
- Vocabulary and matching picture cards previously used
- A low bulletin board for student use
- Previously used teacher made chart of the song, ďThe Wheels on the BusĒ
- About 50 blank sticky notes
- Previously used Formative Assessment Checklists for each student
- One copy of the rhyming pictures and word for the game Silly Rhyming Pictures (from associated file)
- A pocket chart or space on the board or wall for students to display pictures and rhyming words
- Student copies of Itís My Job worksheet (from the associated file)
- One copy of the previously used Summative Assessment #1, Number Stories for each student who has not already completed the assessment
- One copy of the previously used Summative Assessment #2, Rhyme As We Go for each student who has not already completed the assessment
- One copy of the previously used Summative Assessment #3, Transportation
- Student copies of pages 4, 5, and 6 of Summative Assessment #3, Transportation, one copy for each student that has not already completed the assessment
- Centers as described in round two of the unitís associated files

Preparations

1. Preview the Beacon Online Book [A Visit With Grandma]. Since audio will be used during the lesson, it needs to be preloaded to your computer.
2. Locate a means of displaying the computer so that the entire class can view the text and illustrations. This can be a projector, LCD panel, or big screen television. Connect the display devise to the computer to be sure it works.
3. Locate speakers for the computer. Test them to be sure they are working properly. Remember that the audio only works with Internet Explorer as the browser. Netscape does not support the sound.
4. Locate and preview the book [Get Around in Air and Space]. If this book cannot be located, use any book depicting a wide variety of modes of transportation. Be sure some carry people and some cargo. Be sure to have some illustrating a push or pull to change an objectís motion.
5. Continue displaying the vocabulary and matching picture cards previously used in this unit.
6. Continue use of a low bulletin board.
7. Locate a chalk/dry erase board or large piece of chart paper for writing rhyming words.
8. Post the previously used teacher made chart of the song, ďThe Wheels on the Bus.Ē
9. Locate and have available about 50 sticky notes and a marker for writing new words to the song as the students decide what they will sing about and which words need to be changed.
10. Locate the Formative Assessment Checklists used previously.
11. Locate the Assessment Records used on the first day of the unit with the diagnostic assessment.
12. Change centers to reflect Round Two as described in the center information in the unitís associated files.
13. Download and print one copy of the new rhyming pictures and word for the game Silly Rhyming Pictures from associated file.
14. Locate a pocket chart or space on the board or wall for students to display pictures and rhyming words.
15. Download, print, and duplicate the Itís My Job worksheet for each student.
16. Locate a copy of the previously used Summative Assessment #1, Number Stories.
17. Locate a copy of the previously used Summative Assessment #2, Rhyme As We Go.
18. Locate a copy of the previously used Summative Assessment #3, Transportation.
19. Locate copies of the previously duplicated pages 4, 5, and 6 of Summative Assessment #3, Transportation for each student who has not completed the assessment.

Procedures

Note: This is lesson six of seven for the Beacon Learning Center unit, Going to Grandmaís. A link to the unit is available in the top right corner of this online lesson.

This lesson reviews all ten standards previously taught in this unit. The standards stressed are identifies frequently used words, and knows simple descriptions of work and jobs that people do.

Session 1 - Language Arts:

1. Gain studentsí attention by singing the song, ďThe Wheels on the Bus.Ē Invite students to sing along. Point to the words on the chart as you sing. Suggest that the song be sung about a different kind of transportation. Allow students to decide what mode of transportation to sing about today.

2. Ask if there are any words that need to be changed on the chart. Have your sticky notes and markers ready to write the words the students dictate. Follow the procedure established in the previous days for changing the words of the song using sticky notes.

3. As suggested changes are announced, allow a student to locate the word that will be changed on the chart. Call on another student to place the sticky note on the chart.

4. As this activity progresses, formatively assess students as to their ability to identify frequently used words and to construct meaning from the text and chart. Give affirmative and corrective feedback and mark the Formative Assessment Checklist.

5. Now, sing the song using the new words. Point to the words as you sing. This song can also be sung anytime during the day that songs are normally included such as transitions between areas, during outside play, etc.

Session 2 - Language Arts:

6. Show the online book [A Visit With Grandma].

7. Tell students that the online book has many different modes of transportation. Take a picture walk through the pages of the book without using the audio. The purpose of the picture walk is to identify the modes of transportation, how it moves, and to identify any jobs being done to make the transportation work.

8. When viewing the title page of the online book, model telling about the transportation, how it moves, and who makes it work by stating that the transportation is a 3-wheeler. Since it has wheels, it moves by rolling. The driver is the person in front and he makes the 3-wheeler work by pressing the gas with his hand and shifting the gears with his toe. If he wants to stop, he presses the brake with his hand.

9. Have students follow your model and explain the transportation on all proceeding pages.

10. As the activity progresses, formatively assess students as to their ability to understand basic modes of transportation, to name objects that slide, roll, or fly, and to know simple descriptions of work and jobs that people do. Can they locate the mode of transportation? Can they name which modes of transportation slide, roll, or fly? Can they explain who works on or with the transportation to make it move? The purpose of formative feedback is to tell the student why they are right (affirmative) or to guide them towards the correct answer (corrective). Mark the Formative Assessment Checklist.

11. Using the audio version of the online book, listen to the title, title page, and the first page of the story.

12. Tell students that they will be finding the rhyming words in the story. After the audio for the first pages has finished, model finding the rhyming words by repeating the verse on this page. Then, focus on the words say and today. Say the two words several times stressing the rhyming sounds. Then, move the mouse cursor over say in the story. A yellow box will appear to indicate that it is in fact a rhyming word.

13. Click on the rhyming word to cause a popup box to appear showing the two rhyming words together. As the popup box becomes visible, model reading the two rhyming words.

14. Repeat this procedure with the word, today. When today is clicked, the rhyming words will be in reverse order with today appearing first. This reversal helps emphasize that it is the sounds that make rhyming words. Whether the words appear as say and today or today and say, they still rhyme.

15. Continue with the second page of the online book. Listen to the audio of, or read the page. Call on students to tell the rhyming words on page two. Select a student to move the mouse cursor over the rhyming word and to click to make the two rhyming words appear. The student then reads the two rhyming words. Select a different student to identify the second rhyming word and click it. That student then reads the two words that appear.

16. Complete the online book in this manner.

17. As the activity progresses, formatively assess students as to their ability to understand the basic phonetic principle of rhyming words. Can they locate the rhyming words? Can they identify the rhyming sounds? Give both affirmative and corrective feedback. The purpose of formative feedback is to tell the student why they are right (affirmative) or to guide them towards the correct answer (corrective). Mark the Formative Assessment Checklist.

18. As you use the Formative Assessment Checklist, check to make sure that all students are receiving equal opportunity to contribute to discussions and answer questions. Donít allow a few students to dominate.

19. To further extend studentsí understanding of rhyming words and using illustrations to construct meaning of words, play the Silly Rhyming Pictures game again. New words and illustrations needed for round two are available from the associated file.

20. As a review, display all ten words from yesterdayís game on the board or in a pocket chart. Donít read the words. Remind students that you are going to show them a silly picture. The objects or actions in the picture rhyme. It will be the studentsí job to look at the picture and find the rhyming objects or actions in the picture.

21. Place one picture in the pocket chart. Call on a student to select the two words that match the picture and put them with the picture in the pocket chart.

22. When the matching words and picture are displayed, have the student explain how he/she identified the correct words and how he/she knew the words rhyme. Guide students to reveal that they used the illustrations to construct meaning and they used what they have learned about the middles and ends of words being the rhyming sounds that have to match in rhyming words.

23. Continue until all five of the review pictures are grouped with the correct words.

24. Now, tell students that you have more words and pictures that go to the Silly Rhyming Pictures game.

25. Remove the used words and pictures and display all ten of the new words in the pocket chart or on the wall.

26. Students now play the game using the new words and pictures.

27. Show one picture.

28. Remind students that the words on display are the only words that they may use to match the pictures. This forces students to use the illustrations to read words and use the words to help them make sense of the illustration.

29. When a student figures out the two rhyming words that match the picture, have the student place the two words and picture together as a set. Be sure to have the student explain how they figured out the silly rhyming picture. They should verbalize using the picture to suggest words, then finding the word, then finding the words that rhyme. It will be necessary for you to prompt students to share their thinking process aloud.

30. If students get stumped on a picture, give a hint to spur thinking.

31. This activity should generate a group discussion as students attempt to figure out the silly rhyming pictures. Students learn through discussion with peers so encourage this type of learning interaction.

32. Make sure that all students are receiving equal opportunity to contribute to discussions and answer questions. Donít allow a few students to dominate.

33. As the activity progresses, formatively assess students as to their ability to understand the basic phonetic principle of rhyming words. Can they locate the rhyming words? Can they identify the beginning sound? Can they identify the rhyming sounds? Can they make sense of the rhyming words? Mark the Formative Assessment Checklist.

34. Formatively assess students as to their ability to understand the concept of words and construct meaning using illustrations. Can they use the picture to figure out the possible rhyming words? Can they use the rhyming words to construct meaning of the illustration? Can they select logical matches?

35. Continue Summative Assessment #2, Rhyme As We Go. Since this is an individually administered assessment, it may take several days to complete. Center time may be the best opportunity to call students to you to administer the assessment. The assessment is available from the unitís associated files.

Session 3 - Social Studies, Science, Language Arts:

36. Review the definition of transportation as movement of people, products, or ideas from one place to another.

37. Review the movements of slide, roll, fly, and step by asking individuals to read the column headings. As the word is read, ask what that word means. Ask for demonstrations that show what the word means.

38. Call on students to read the words in the slide, roll, fly, step columns on the bulletin board. This can be done by placing students in a circle and having each student in turn read a word on the list as the teacher points.

39. Continue until all of the transportation words have been read. After everyone has had a turn, consult your Formative Assessment Checklist and select students who need further assistance with identifying frequently used words to read the remaining words. Be sure to give phonemic clues to assist students in remembering the words.

40. As the activity progresses, formatively assess students as to their ability to identify the words. Mark the Formative Assessment Checklist.

41. Show students the book [Get Around in Air and Space]. Ask students to specifically look for modes of transportation that have not been in any of the other books read as a class as you take a picture walk through the book. Even though this book is about transporting in air and space, a variety of modes of transportation is shown.

42. The purpose of the picture walk is to review modes of transportation, whether they are used to move people, products (cargo), and/or ideas, their importance, advantages (a good about it), and disadvantages (a bad about it) and identify and discuss work and job responsibilities on the various modes of transportation.

43. Using the cover of the book, ask students to name the mode of transportation. Then, you model telling what the transportation carries, why it is important, and its advantages and disadvantages.

44. Model discussing transportation related jobs. Talk about the main people that make the transportation work and what they have to do to make the transportation move correctly. Use the helicopter on the cover of the book while modeling. Discuss that the person who flies the helicopter is called the pilot. The pilot steers the helicopter, controls the speed, controls how high or low it flies, and talks on the radio to let others know where the helicopter is and when and where it will land.

45. After you have modeled these procedures several times, begin to have students fill in the information as to what the transportation is called, what is carried, why it is important, its advantages and disadvantages, who is working on the transportation, and what is done in the job. Call on as many students as possible while this discussion is progressing.

46. On page 12 of the book, a basket is being lowered from the helicopter. At this point, remind students that the motion of an object can be changed by using a push or a pull. Remind students of the push and pull demonstrations shown previously. Points to review are: Push is from the back and pull is from the front. Some things can be pushed but not pulled. Some things can be pulled but not pushed. Some things can be pushed and pulled. Remember to use the push pull wording whenever possible in daily classroom activities such as: push your chair in, pull the box of crayons over in front of you, push your coat into your cubbie, pull the papers out of your backpack.

47. Ask if the basket is being pushed or pulled by the rope from the helicopter on page 12. Allow for discussion. Guide students to the consensus that basket is pulling down when it is being lowered, but the rope is pulling when the basket is being raised back up.

48. Discuss changing the movement of objects by using a push or a pull anytime an example is presented in the book. Possible examples are the stretcher on page 13, the box on page 14, the fire fighting chemicals on page 16, and the weed killer on page 17.

49. As the activity progresses, formatively assess students as to their ability to understand basic modes of transportation and to discuss modes of transportation used to move people, products, and ideas from place to place, their importance, and their advantages and disadvantages. Can they identify modes of transportation? Can they discuss what is being transported? Can they discuss advantages such as how fast the mode moves or how much it carries? Can they discuss disadvantages such as lack of tracks or lack of drivers? Can they discuss importance such as boats are important for transporting across water because they float.

50. Formatively assess students as to their ability to know that the motion of an object can be changed by a push or a pull. Can students tell how they know an object was pushed or pulled? Can they explain movement of objects using the words push and pull?

51. Also, formatively assess whether students know simple descriptions of work and jobs that people do. Do they know what the job is called? Do they have an idea of what is done in the job? Remember that the standard states that they know simple descriptions, so great detail is not necessary. Give affirmative and corrective feedback. Mark the Formative Assessment Checklist.

52. Check the Formative Assessment Checklist to see who has not yet mastered these standards and focus on giving opportunity and assistance to these individuals.

53. When the picture walk is complete, remind students that they have seen a lot of different kinds of transportation in the book. Wonder out loud as to how fast the different modes of transportation are, comparing them to the speed of a car and whether the transportation moves by sliding, flying, rolling, or stepping.

54. Read the book. As you read, ask students to classify each mode of transportation as to how it moves and whether it is faster or slower than a car. Several pages of the book have multiple modes of transportation, so be sure to address all the modes. Also, several of the modes of transportation display more than one way of moving, so be sure to address all possible types of movement.

55. Take every opportunity to have students construct meaning of words from the text. When an unfamiliar word or phrase appears in the text, model using the illustrations to construct meaning. Ask students to discuss the meaning of the word or phrase using the content and illustrations.

56. As the activity progresses, formatively assess students as to their ability to understand that different things move at different speeds, whether they can name things that roll, slide, or fly, and understands meaning of words and constructs meaning from text and illustrations. Ask the students how they know what they are discussing. Listen for an explanation of using the content, text, and/or illustrations to help the student comprehend. Give formative feedback. Mark the Formative Assessment Checklist.

57. Distribute the worksheet, Itís My Job, to each student. This worksheet serves as an individual formative assessment. Read the directions to the students. When students are finished, collect the worksheets and mark the Formative Assessment Checklist to indicate the studentsí mastery.

58. Return the worksheets as soon as possible and review them orally allowing students to tell and explain their answers. Give affirmative and corrective feedback.

59. Continue Summative Assessment #3, Transportation. Remember that this is an individually administered assessment, it will take several days to complete. Continue with those students who you believe will show mastery of the standards the first time. This will give additional review and instruction to those needing it as the unit progresses. This also allows for the best use of your time. The assessment is available from the unitís associated files.

Session 4 - Mathematics:

60. Refer students to the graph, Going to Grandmaís, that was constructed previously.

61. Remind students that the graph on the board shows the transportation students used to visit their favorite grandma.

62. Erase the graph. Tell students that you will be rebuilding the graph, but this time Grandma will be the one using the transportation.

63. Ask students to think about their favorite grandma again. Think about the last time their grandmas visited them at the studentsí houses. Now, think about what transportation Grandma used to visit.

64. Using your attendance sheet so you donít miss any students, ask each student what transportation Grandma used the last time Grandma came to the studentís house.

65. As each student responds, write the mode of transportation in a column on the left of the graph and have the student move his or her name sticky note to the graph.

66. If the mode of transportation already appears on the graph, the student adds his/her sticky note to the appropriate place.

67. When the graph is complete, call on students to read the words along the left of the graph.

68. Use the new graph to demonstrate how to tell math stories. For example, tell this story: ďSome of our students visited grandma all by themselves. How many of our grandmas visited using transportation that rolls?Ē To act out the story, discuss which modes of transportation on the graph move by rolling. Possible answers may be in a car, van, bus, mobile home, and bike. Have students whose grandmas used a mode of transportation that moves by rolling the last time they visited to stand up. Then end the story by saying, ď(appropriate number) of grandmas last visited using a transportation that rolls.Ē

69. After you have modeled using the graph to tell math stories and how students can be the objects acting out the stories, show unifix cubes and model how the unifix cubes can be used as objects instead of people when acting out stories. This will assist any students who are having problems transferring their acting from live objects to manipulatives and will help in preparing students for Summative Assessment #1, Number Stories.

70. Ask volunteers to tell math stories. After each story is told, select students to act out the story.

71. As the activity progresses, formatively assess students as to their ability to create and act out number stories using objects . Can they create a number story? Can they act it out? Give formative feedback. Mark the Formative Assessment Checklist.

72. Continue using Summative Assessment #1, Number Stories for those students ready for this summative assessment. Since this is an individually administered assessment, during center time may be the best opportunity to call students to you to administer the assessment.

Session 5 - Centers Ė Round 2, Day 1 of 5:
Group the students into five groups. Each group participates in one center per day for five days. Explanations of the various centers are available from the unitís associated files.

Session 6 - Outdoor Activity:
During outdoor play, have students practice the concept of changing motion of an object by a push or pull. This can be done as a follow oral directions activity. Have the students form a circle. Using an empty box as your object, give directions such as: Bill, pull the box to the middle of the circle. Now, Nancy, push the box to Anna. Give formative feedback to reinforce the concept of the motion of an object being changed by a push or a pull.

Assessments

Continue Summative Assessment #1, Number Stories. The assessment tool and all instructions are available from the unitís associated files. This assessment must be given one-on-one.

Continue Summative Assessment #2, Rhyme As We Go. The assessment tools and all instructions are available from the unitís associated files. This assessment must be given one-on-one.

Continue Summative Assessment #3, Transportation. The assessment tools and all instructions are available from the unitís associated files. Parts of this assessment can be given small or whole group; however, the conferencing section must be given one-on-one.

Formative assessments of the identified standards will be conducted as described in the procedures. Results of the formative assessment are recorded on the Formative Assessment Checklist from the unitís associated files. For a link to the unit see the top right corner of this lesson plan or the extensions section for the URL.

Assess students as to their ability to know simple descriptions of work and jobs that people do. Can the students name various jobs that relate to transportation such as a driver, pilot, farmer, astronaut, etc.? Can the student give a simple description of what the worker might do in the job? Remember that the standard specifically says that students know a simple description, so only a general description with few details is adequate as long as the description is accurate.

Assess students as to their ability to know the names of objects that roll, slide, or fly. Can the student name the object? Can the student demonstrate knowledge of the meaning of the words slide, roll, and fly?

Assess students as to their ability to know that the motion of an object can be changed by a push or a pull. Do students know the difference in a push and a pull? Can students demonstrate a push or pull? Can students discuss how objects are moved using a push and/or pull?

Assess students as to their ability to understand the basic phonetic principle of rhyming words. Could they tell you which words rhyme? Did they understand that the rhyming sounds come from the middle and end of the words and that the beginning sounds can be different? Could they recognize rhyming words?

Assess students as to their ability to discuss whether modes of transportation are used to move people, products, or ideas from place to place, their importance, and their advantages and disadvantages. Can they tell what is good and/or bad about each mode of transportation? Can they tell why it is important? Can they tell what is moved by the transportation?

Assess students as to their ability to understand that different things move at different speeds. Can they tell which objects are slower and faster?

Assess students as to their ability to understand basic modes of transportation. Can they identify which objects are modes of transportation?

Assess students as to their ability to understand the concept of words and to construct meaning of words from shared text and illustrations. Do they use the text to make meaning of words? Do they use the illustrations to make meaning of words? Do the context of the words and the illustrations aid in comprehension?

Assess students as to their ability to identify frequently used words. Can the student read words after they have been presented? Can the student locate the word in a passage or from the bulletin board?

Assess students as to their ability to create and act out number stories using objects. Can they tell a number story? Do they use the objects to act out the story?

Extensions

1. The Beacon Unit Plan associated with this lesson can be viewed by clicking on the link located at the top of this page or by using the following URL: http://www.beaconlearningcenter.com/search/details.asp?item=3852. Once you select the unitís link, scroll to the bottom of the unit plan page to find the section, ďAssociated Files.Ē This section contains links to the Unit Plan Overview, Diagnostic and Summative Assessments, and other associated files, (if any).
2. The graphing activity can easily be extended to include, the student interprets data exhibited in concrete or pictorial graphs. Allow students to interpret data exhibited such as: Which modes of transportation have wheels? Which modes of transportation move by flying?
3. Any of these activities can be modified to accommodate whole groups or small groups.
4. ESOL students may need a peer tutor to assist in translations.
5. The list of vocabulary may be sent home for parental assistance in learning the words.
6. All sessions of this lesson can be adapted to whole group or small group to meet the needs of individual classes.
7. See the Effective Reading Instructions document from the unit plan's associated files for a correlation between strategies from this lesson and effective reading instruction.
8. Various career puppets are availble in many classrooms. This lesson lends itself to the use of these puppets. Students can roleplay as they describe work and jobs that people do.

Web Links

Students interact with rhyming words as they use this poem to explore various modes of transportation children use to visit their grandmas. Audio is available for this online book.
A Visit With Grandma

Attached Files

Word and picture cards for the Silly Rhyming Pictures activity†††††File Extension: pdf

Itís My Job student worksheet†††††File Extension: pdf

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