Beacon Lesson Plan Library

Likeable Differences

Michelle Barlow

Description

This two day lesson teaches students how to compare and contrast two characters by using a Venn Diagram.

Objectives

The student understands a variety of textual organizations (for example, comparison and contrast, cause-and-effect, sequence of events).

Materials

1 apple and 1 orange (or two other objects to compare and contrast)
Paper and pencils for students
A copy of the reading textbook BEAT THE STORY DRUM, Published by Macmillan/ McGraw-Hill Copyright 1993 (or another reading text)
Overhead projector and markers
Overhead transparency sheets

Preparations

1. Secure an apple and an orange.
2. Gather overhead projector, markers, and transparency sheets.
3. Make sure there are enough of the BEAT THE STORY DRUM textbooks for each child.

Procedures

Day 1:
1. Begin the lesson by showing the class an apple and an orange. Ask the students to describe the apple and then the orange. Tell the class that these two items are different, but that they also have some traits that are the same. Explain to the class that they are going to learn how to compare and contrast two different items by using a Venn diagram.
2. Draw a Venn diagram on the overhead and explain how students will place the characteristics in the circles. Show students how to properly label one circle Apples and one circle Oranges. Make certain that the students understand that the portion of the circles that overlap is where they will record like characteristics for the apple and orange.
3. Begin by having students tell you all of the traits that both the apple and the orange share (they are both round, they are a fruit, they grow on trees etc...). As the students tell like traits, write them in the middle portion of the diagram.
4. Have students tell items that they know are true about apples but are not characteristics of oranges ( apples are red, crispy, crunchy, etc...). List these characteristics in the circle labeled Apples. Next, have students tell characteristics that only match the orange. List these characteristics in the circle labeled oranges.
5. Discuss with the class how the Venn diagram is an easy way to see the features that are different between apples and oranges. Explain that the diagram also shows how they have many similar characteristics, too.
6. Tell the class that they are now going to work with a partner to practice comparing and contrasting two different people. Divide the class into groups of two. Tell the students that they are to use a Venn diagram to compare and contrast themselves with their partners. Tell the students that they must discover five like traits with their partner and five different traits. Clarify by telling them that they will have five items listed in each circle, and five items must be in the overlapping portion of the diagram. Allow the class to use the remaining time to work on this activity.
Day 2:
1. Begin by reviewing with the class how to use a Venn diagram.
2. Have a couple of groups draw their Venn diagram that they did with their partner in Day One's session on the overhead. Allow the groups to explain their diagram to the class.
3. Explain to the class that they are now going to apply comparing and contrasting to a reading activity. Tell the students that they are going to use a Venn diagram to compare and contrast two characters in a story.
4. Introduce the story -Mufaro's Beautiful Daughters- page 474-498 in the reading textbook BEAT THE STORY DRUM ( or use a story that you wish instead). Tell the students that they are to listen and read along in their text book as you read the story aloud. Explain that after the story has been read they are going to use a Venn diagram to compare and contrast the two sisters in the story.
5. Read the story aloud.
6. Have the students create their Venn diagrams comparing the two sisters from the story. Tell the students that they should find as many differences and common traits for the two characters as they can.

Assessments

Use the Venn diagrams that the students create from the reading assignment to check for comprehension. If the students are able to list at least three or four similar traits and three or four traits that are true to each character separately, then they have grasped this concept.

For students who do not have a good understanding of this concept, allow them to work with a partner or volunteer to compare and contrast characters from their favorite Fairy Tales.

Extensions

If students do well comparing and contrasting the two sisters from -Mufaro's Beautiful Daughter's,- take them to the next level by having them use the information from their diagram to write a paragraph that compares and contrasts the two characters.

For any student who is not quite confident with comparing and contrasting, allow them the opportunity to work with a peer to compare and contrast two other characters from a story that they choose.
Return to the Beacon Lesson Plan Library.