Beacon Lesson Plan Library

Crazy Critters are Figuratively Fantastic

Andrea Farage

Description

The -Crazy Critters are Figuratively Fantastic- lesson uses creatures created from student's imaginations to teach hyperbole, simile, metaphor, and alliteration in association with creative writing.

Objectives

The student proofreads writing to correct convention errors in mechanics, usage, and punctuation, using dictionaries, handbooks, and other resources, including teacher or peers, as appropriate.

The student analyzes and revises draft to further develop a piece of writing by adding or deleting details and explanations; clarifying difficult passages; and rearranging words, sentences, and paragraphs to improve meaning.

The student uses electronic technology appropriate to writing tasks (including but not limited to the Internet, databases and software) to create, revise, retrieve, and verify information.

The student knows ways the author's word choice contributes to the meaning of a text.

The student analyzes and describes the use of symbolism and figurative language in fiction or nonfiction.

Materials

-Peer evaluation worksheet (in attached file)
-Teacher evaluation worksheet (in attached file)
-Simile worksheet (in attached file)
-Metaphor worksheet (in attached file)
-Hyperbole worksheet (in attached file)
-Alliteration worksheet (in attached file)
-Short story or creative writing (teacher’s choice)

Preparations

1. Copy worksheets in attached file (optional)
2. If you choose not to use worksheets, you will need to make transparencies of the worksheets in the attached file.
3. Transparency Pens
4. Overhead
5. Copy teacher evaluation sheet (one for each child)
6. Copy peer evaluation sheet (one for each child)

Procedures

Day One
1. The teacher introduces the lesson by reading a short story or piece of writing that incorporates figurative and descriptive language. (teacher’s choice)
2. Initiate a discussion on descriptive writing and ask students what they believe is essential for good writing.
4. The teacher asks the students if they can see the story just read to them.
5. Ask, -Which images are especially vivid?- Point out the figurative language that was used to “paint” the picture for the reader.
6. Hand out the worksheet on Create a Critter for students to complete.
7. Have volunteers read their paragraphs out loud to the class. Discuss what works well and tell students that figurative language skills help make it easier for readers to see the pictures the writer has in his head.
8. Students take home their paragraphs and correct any spelling and punctuation errors they see.

Day Two
9. Review figurative language and the purpose of figurative language in writing.
10. Review worksheet #2 on alliteration. Students fill out pages and highlight their two favorite examples of alliteration. They later incorporate these examples into their paragraph.
11. Review worksheet #5 on hyperbole. Students fill out pages and highlight their favorite examples of hyperbole. They later incorporate one example into their paragraph.
12. These worksheets can be filled out in cooperative groups or with partners. If you choose to have the students fill these sheets out cooperatively, you can add to the number of examples each group is required to develop.
13. After reviewing alliteration and hyperbole, students reread their paragraphs created during day one. Students need to find a spot in their paragraph where their examples will easily flow into the story content. They use the rest of the class period to rewrite their paragraphs using the two examples of alliteration and the one hyperbole.

Day Three
14. Once again, start class by reading an example of good writing that contains figurative language (specifically similes and metaphors).
15. Have students write down any examples of similes or metaphors they hear in your reading. This makes a fun competition for extra points that will be added to their final product.
16. Review the simile assignment on the overhead. Students then complete the worksheets on similes within their cooperative learning groups or individually (depending on the structure you choose to use).
17. Lead a class discussion on similes with the groups providing examples they have developed.
18. Review and fill out the sheet on metaphors. (In the same manner you reviewed similes)
19. Spend 10 minutes reviewing metaphors and examples once students finish the sheet on metaphors.
20. After reviewing similes and metaphors, students reread their paragraphs created during day one. Students need to find a spot in their paragraph where their examples will easily flow into the story content. Students use the rest of the class period to rewrite their paragraphs using the two examples of similes and metaphors. (Two of each)
21. Students' rewrites should be typed in a word-processing program (optional depending on the resources your students have available to them).

Assessments

During the lesson and activities, you will use the following formative assessment criteria:
-Peer evaluation worksheets for self-assessment and revision
-Teacher evaluation and comment sheet (evaluation of student writing)
-Sheets on similes, metaphors, hyperbole, and alliteration graded for accuracy

Extensions

Modifications: Students with stronger writing and leadership skills are paired with students of lower learning levels to help complete activities. This learning level should be determined prior to this activity by teacher evaluation of previous writing assignments.

Extensions: There is a creative writing lesson entitled Crazy Critters Creative writing assignment that is a good introduction to this unit. There is also a parts of speech lesson entitled Crazy Critters Teach Parts of Speech.
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