Beacon Lesson Plan Library

Any Way You Slice It

Farica King
Santa Rosa District Schools

Description

Using real-world text, students learn about the history of peanut butter and jelly sandwiches while using a graphic organizer to clarify meaning of text. Following the activity, students write directions on how to make a peanut butter and jelly sandwich. Students then exchange directions and follow their classmate's recipe to make a peanut butter and jelly sandwich.

Objectives

The student uses a graphic organizer to clarify meaning of text.

Materials

-Peanut butter & jelly
-Bread
-Napkins
-Plastic knives
-Paper plates
-Article on the history of peanut butter & jelly sandwiches; one copy per student (see Associated File)
-KWL Chart; one copy per student (see Associated File)

Preparations

VERY IMPORTANT: Before teaching this lesson, make sure no student in the class is allergic to peanut butter!
(Almond butter can be substituted for peanut butter if students are allergic to peanut butter.)

1. Purchase peanut butter, jelly, and bread for sandwiches. Ensure there is enough food for each student in the class.
2. Prepare several peanut butter & jelly sandwiches and cut into bite-size pieces for opening activity.
3. Obtain napkins, plates, and plastic knives for spreading. (Don’t forget wipes if no sink is available.)
4. Download and print out “History of the Peanut Butter & Jelly Sandwich” from the Associated File section.
5. Download and print out KWL Chart from Associated File section; create one overhead transparency copy.
6. Obtain copies of article and KWL Chart for each student in the class.
7. Review Weblink section if more information is needed on the KWL chart strategy.

Procedures

1. Gain attention by passing out bite-size pieces of peanut butter and jelly sandwiches. Allow students to eat the sandwiches.

2. While students are snacking, ask students if they know how the peanut butter and jelly sandwich was invented.

3. Following the discussion, tell students they will learn more today about the history of the peanut butter and jelly sandwich. Inform them they will also get to write directions for making peanut butter and jelly sandwiches and will then make and eat them.

4. Distribute KWL charts and review how to fill out the three sections. As a group, discuss what everyone already knows about peanut butter and jelly sandwiches. Record these responses on the KWL charts. (The teacher’s responses should be recorded on the KWL overhead transparency.)

5. Next, discuss aloud what students want to know about the history of the peanut butter and jelly sandwich. Record these responses on the KWL charts. (The teacher’s responses should be recorded on the KWL overhead transparency.)

6. Distribute “History of the Peanut Butter and Jelly Sandwich” article. (see Associated File)


7. Read article aloud and discuss as a group.

8. After reading the article, have students fill in the final section of the KWL chart (“What We Learned” section). Discuss as a class and record final responses on the KWL overhead transparency.

9. Following completing the KWL chart, have each student write step by step directions for making a peanut butter and jelly sandwich. Be sure to discuss why clear directions are important. Remind students to be very specific and include every step. Assist students as needed.

10. Once students have finished writing the directions for making their sandwiches, have students exchange directions.

11. Next, instruct students to follow the written directions to make their sandwiches. Remind students to follow the directions given. Once they are finished, check each student’s sandwich to ensure they were able to use print information for the desired purpose. Once sandwiches have been checked, students may then be allowed to eat their sandwich.

12. At the end of class, collect KWL charts and written directions for formative assessment purposes.

Assessments

Formatively assess graphic organizers to determine if the student used a graphic organizer to clarify meaning of text.

Evaluate students on the sandwiches they make to determine if students used print information for the specified purpose. If the written directions are complete, each student should end up with a complete sandwich.

Extensions

Extend or modify the lesson by using the history of pizza, sub sandwiches, popcorn, etc. to match the students’ needs or interest. (See Weblinks section for several links on the history of these foods.) For students functioning at the supported or participatory level, provide a peer to assist in completion of the lesson activities.

Web Links

This site contains more information on KWL charts – what they are and how to use them.
KWL Charts

This site gives information on the history of popcorn.
Encyclopedia Popcornia

This site contains information on the history of pizza.
History of Pizza

This site contains information on the history of Subway sandwiches and the founder, Fred DeLuca.
History of Subway Sandwiches

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