Beacon Lesson Plan Library

Ample Apples

Sissy Gandy
Santa Rosa District Schools

Description

Students make observations about the growing process of an apple tree. They complete expository writing and draw illustrations in a student writing book. This lesson includes a cooking activity.

Objectives

The student uses a variety of context cues (for example, illustrations, diagrams, information in the story, titles and headings, sequence) to construct meaning (meaning cues).

The student writes legibly.

The student uses complete sentences in writing.

The student spells frequently used words correctly.

The student uses strategies to `finish` a piece of writing (for example, incorporating illustrations, photos, charts, and graphs; preparing a final copy).

The student extends previously learned writing knowledge and skills of the first grade with increasingly complex texts and assignments and tasks.

Materials

-Book about apples such as JOHNNY APPLESEED by Aliki, 1989, The Trumpet Club, New York.
-Display board such as bulletin board or chart tablet
-Bulletin board paper if using bulletin board
-Markers
-Teacher-made writing book with three pages of plain white paper cut in half for each student .(There should be a total of 6 writing pages in each book.)
-Coloring items for students such as crayons or colored pencils
-Construction paper (brown, green, white, red, light blue, yellow)
-Transparent tape
-Stapler
-Pencils
-One apple cut in half to see seeds
-Ingredients for recipe (See -Recipe by Me!- located at http://www.scholastic.com/parentandchild/snacks
-Appliances such as hot plate and blender
-Large pot and spoon for cooking activity
-One serving bowl and spoon for each student

Preparations

1. Draw a background picture. (See associated file)
2. Cut out letters for display title, -An Ample Amount of Apples.- An ellison machine might be helpful.
3. Use construction paper to cut two small seedlings and two trees from brown paper, leaves from green paper, a sun from yellow, raindrops from light blue, blossoms from white, and apples (one to represent every child in class) from red. (You may wish to have yellow or green apples instead of red.) You might find the ellison machine helpful in cutting out some of these things.
4. Make a background display by covering a bulletin board with paper or by using a chart tablet.
5. Make a writing book for each student out of 1 piece of construction paper (cover) and 3 pieces of plain white paper which will be cut in half to make a total of 6 writing pages. Staple or bind the book together.
6. Write recipe for applesauce sundaes on chart. See weblink http//www,scholastic.com/parentandchild/snacks.
7. Gather ingredients for recipe.
8. Get a book about apples.

Procedures

Day1:
1. Introduce and read a book about apples aloud to your students.

2. Direct students' attention to the display board. Read the title and ask students if anyone knows what the word -ample- means. Explain that it means more than enough or a large number. Tell students, -We are going to plant apple seeds and watch them to see how apples grow. I hope that in the end we will have ample amounts of apples for the class to share.-

3. Take a marker and draw two holes in the soil area of the display picture. Show the students the apple that has been cut in half. Take the seeds from the apple and tape one or two in each hole. Ask students what a seed would need to grow. Explain that it needs good soil, sunshine, and water. So, pretend to pour water in the holes and cover the seeds by wiping your hand across the hole.

4. Pass out a writing booklet to each student. Have students write their names on the front covers with their pencils. (Make sure names are on the front and the book opens the right way.)

5. Review the steps that you did to plant the apple seeds. Have students turn to page one. Tell students to write sentences on this page that tell the steps we went through to plant the apple seeds. Tell them they must have two or more sentences about planting the apple seeds. Have students draw and color a picture for the display at the bottom of the page. They must have the basics from the picture, but they may add their own ideas to their pictures.

6. When students finish, collect the books.

7. When students are not around, change the display board by adding roots growing from the seeds into the soil, stapling small seedlings growing out of the soil, and adding raindrops coming from the sky.

Day 2:
1. Call students' attention to the display board. (Most of the time someone will have already noticed!) Discuss with the students how the picture has changed. Ask them, -Why are the raindrops important?-

2. Pass out writing books to students. Review the changes that took place. Tell students to turn to page two. Tell them to write two or more sentences telling about the changes that occurred, and then illustrate the bottom of the page according to what they see on the display board.

3. Take up the books.

4. When students are not around, change the display board by replacing the seedlings with young trees with leaves and replacing the rain with the sun.

Day 3:
1. Look at the display board, and discuss the changes that took place.

2. Pass out the writing books to students. Review information students shared about the changes on the display.

3. Have students turn to page three. Tell students to write two or more sentences about what they see that has changed on the display. They should finish by drawing and coloring a picture on the bottom of the page.

4. Take up the writing books.

5. When students leave, change the display by stapling a dozen or so blossoms and apples representing the number of students in the class on the trees.

Day 4:
1. Looking at the display board, discuss the changes from the previous day with the students. Discuss that fruit trees grow in orchards. Explain that orchards are a group of trees that produce fruit, nuts, or berries.

2. Pass out the writing books to students. Review the information students shared about the changes on the display.

3. Have students turn to page four. Tell students to write two or more sentences about what they see that has changed on the display. They should finish by drawing and coloring a picture on the bottom of the page.

4. Take up the writing books.

Day 5:
1. Review how an apple grows by having student volunteers read what they wrote on pages 1- 4 of their writing books.

2. Ask students what they would do with the delicious apples if they could pick them. Let students share what they would do with the apples.

3. Pass out the writing books. Have students turn to page five. Tell them to write what they want to do with the apples and draw a picture that shows what they did. (They may color their picture.)

4. While students are completing this assignment, put the ingredients and materials for making the recipe on the table.

5. Get students' attention. Tell them that if you picked the apples, you would make applesauce.

6. Have students gather around the table where they can see.

7. Show students the recipe on the chart and read it aloud.

8. Take the already sliced apples and put them in the large pan. Then follow the chart to complete the cooking activity.

9. While apples are cooking, students should look in their book and choose their best picture. They should draw this picture on the front cover and write a title of their choice. They may want to use your title. They should be sure to write their name as the author.

10. When apples are cooked and pureed in a blender, serve the applesauce to students. You may or may not wish to serve items for sundaes. Happy eating!

11. If time permits or at a later date, students should finish the book by writing, -Meet the Author- on page six and then writing sentences about themselves. They should include their name and other information about their likes and dislikes.

Assessments

Students are assessed by the completion of a writing book that explains the process an apple tree goes through from the planting of a seed through the picking of the apples produced by the tree. Students write two or more complete sentences on each page that explains daily changes that occur in illustrations on a display. Students draw pictures to explain their writing on each page. The teacher completes a rubric to assess student's writing. Students use a graphic display to produce a book that reveals their knowledge of the growth and changes of apple trees to assess Goal 3 standards.

Extensions

The teacher may use any book about apples to introduce this lesson. I use the big book about Johnny Appleseed by Aliki with my students. Also, a favorite -apple - recipe could easily be substituted for the recipe included in the lesson.

This lesson could be used in October or November with pumpkins that grow on a vine. This is how I use it most of the time.

The teacher could have a graph prepared (for Day 5) to graph what children wanted to do with the apples if they picked them. Give each student an apple off the tree from the display board. Have students write their names and what they would do. Then put this information on a graph board that the teacher has made.

Web Links

Web supplement for Ample Apples
Scholastic

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