Beacon Lesson Plan Library

Ingredients for a Story

Michelle Barlow

Description

This lesson teaches students the three elements (characters, plot, and setting) needed to create a story.

Objectives

The student understands the development of plot in a fourth grade level or higher story.

The student knows the similarities and differences of characters presented within and across fourth grade or higher level selections.

The student knows the similarities and differences of settings presented within and across fourth grade or higher level selections.

Materials

-Story elements overhead transparency (see attached file)
-Index cards with samples of characters, story plots, and story settings (see attached file for a sample list)
-Copies of fairy tales, fables and other short stories
-One copy of the -Ingredients for a Story Worksheet- for each student (see attached file)

Preparations

-Make a copy of -Story Ingredients Definition Sheets- on overhead transparency sheets (see attached file).
-Make cards with samples of story characters, plots and settings (see attached file).
-Run off enough copies of the -Story Ingredients Worksheet- for each child (see attached file).
-Gather copies of several different fairy tales and other short stories.

Procedures

1. Begin the lesson by telling the class that they are going to learn about all of the needed ingredients to create a story.

2. Show students the overhead transparency with the definition and examples of the first story element--characters. (see attached file)Discuss the definition of characters. Make certain that the class understands that characters are not always people. Go over samples of characters from stories that your class is familiar with.

3. Show students the overhead transparency with the definition and examples of the second story element--setting (see attached file). Discuss with the students the definition and provide examples of story settings.

4. Show students the overhead transparency with the definition and examples of the third story element--plot (see attached file). Discuss with the students the definition and show examples of story plots.

5. Review all three elements of a story.

6. Pass out an index card with an example of a character, plot, or setting written on it to each child (see attached file for list).

7. Tell students that they are to read what is on their card and decide if it is a character, setting, or plot for a story.

8. Give the students a couple of minutes to decide which element is on their card.

9. Go around the room and have each student read his or her card and tell which element he or she has. Take time to discuss any that the class might not understand.

10. Tell the students that they are now going to choose a short story to read and then pick out the characters, setting, and the plot from the story.

11. Explain to the students that they will be filling in a -Story Ingredients Worksheet- for the story that they choose (see attached file). Tell them that they will be listing the characters, setting, and plot on the sheet.

12. Allow students to use the remaing class time to fill out the -Ingredients for a Story Worksheet.-

Assessments

Use the -Story Ingredients Worksheet- to assess student's understanding of the three elements of a story. Students should be able to clearly list the characters and explain the setting and plot from the short story that they choose to read.

Extensions

This lesson could be extended by having students write their own stories. Students that are ready for this step should fill out a -Story Ingredients Worksheet- to show that they have characters, a setting, and a plot for their story.

Modify this lesson for students that are still having trouble by allowing more oral discussions and work in a peer group.
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