Beacon Lesson Plan Library

Lots of Lessons from Aesop

Martha Todd
Santa Rosa District Schools

Description

Students use two of AESOP'S FABLES to learn theme, simile, alliteration, and metaphor.

Objectives

The student reads a variety of literary and informational texts (for example, fiction, drama, poetry, myths, fantasies, historical fiction, biographies, autobiographies, textbooks, manuals, magazines).

The student identifies and uses literary terminology appropriate to fifth grade or higher level (including but not limited to theme, simile, alliteration, metaphor).

Materials

-Copy of two of AESOP'S FABLES for each student (available on web site given below)
-Chalk/Chalkboard

Preparations

1. Browse the web site given and print three fables.
2. Select two of the chosen fables and make copies of each for each student.
3. Make a copy of the scoring rubric for each student (see attached file).

Procedures

1. Read one of AESOP'S FABLES to the class and discuss fables. Discuss the moral of the fable.

2. Give each student a copy of another one of AESOP'S FABLES that you have selected from the web site.

3. Read the fable orally.

4. Write the term “theme” on the board and discuss the fact that “theme” usually is the main idea of a fictional piece. Discuss the theme of the fable together. Students write the term “theme” on their copy of the fable and write what they think the theme of the fable is. Let students share their ideas.

5. Write the term “simile” on the board and discuss its meaning. (A simile is a statement comparing two things using “like” or “as”). The students write the term “simile” on their copy of the fable and write a simile about the fable. Share similes.

6. Write the term “metaphor” on the board and discuss its meaning. ( A metaphor is a statement comparing two things without using “like” or “as”. ) The students write the term “metaphor” on their copy of the fable, and write a metaphor about the fable. Share metaphors.

7. Write the term “alliteration” on the board and discuss its meaning. ( Example: Decorative doors dominated the dorm decorations.) Students write the term “alliteration” on their copy of the fable and write a sentence using alliteration about the fable. Share sentences.

8. Review the four terms with the students. Keeping their copy of the fable and their sentences to use as reference, give each student a copy of another of AESOP'S FABLES from the web site.

9. Read the fable orally.

10. Students demonstrate their knowledge of the four literary terms discussed in the lesson by writing an example of each using the new AESOP'S FABLE (given in step 8). Students write each of the four terms on the paper. They write four sentences demonstrating their understanding of the four terms. Each sentence must be a good example of the meaning of the term and must relate to the fable.

11. Sentences are scored by the teacher, using the scoring rubric (see file), and a conference is held with each student to correct any misunderstandings.

Assessments

Students write examples of the four literary terms covered, using the AESOP'S FABLES given to them by the teacher for the basis of their sentences. Students are assessed on their sentences, illustrating their knowledge of the four terms discussed in the lesson, and having the sentences apply to the fable given them, at 75% correct.

*The web site given has the capability of letting the students hear the fable read to them. This would be excellent to use with special-needs students or with any student who would like to hear more fables. (There are 655+ fables available!) The site also gives lesson plans!

Extensions

Students write their own fable and include at least two of the terms learned in this lesson.

Web Links

Web supplement for Lots of Lessons from Aesop
Aesop's Fables

Attached Files

A scoring rubric to be used for assessing students.     File Extension: pdf

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