Beacon Lesson Plan Library

Health Hounds

Laurie Ayers
Bay District Schools

Description

This is the first health lesson for Day 2 of the unit [Wellness Wonders]. A problem scenario is read to students. Students are asked to become health experts to solve the problem. Unit standards and vocabulary are introduced.

Objectives

The student knows how personal health behaviors influence individual well-being.

The student uses strategies for improving or maintaining personal health.

The student knows how to make progress toward achieving a personal goal (eg., by creating an action plan for individual wellness plan).

The student knows how to enlist family, school, and community helpers to aid in achieving health goals.

Materials

-Hound Dog picture (see associated file)
-Problem Scenario (see associated file)
-Designated wall or bulletin board space for the Big Word Wall
-Board space or chart paper and markers
-Sample Skit Scenarios (for performances to be done on Day 5), copies for each student participant (see associated file)
Health Hound Handout 1, one copy per student (see associated file)
Health Hound Handout 1 Key, one copy (see associated file)
-Light-colored 12”x18” construction paper, one piece per student
-Crayons
-Speaker Guides, one per speaker (see associated file)
-Action Plan transparency (see associated file)
-Overhead projector
-Note to Parents, one copy per student (see associated file)
-Unit Vocabulary and Meanings (see extensions)
-Unit Sunshine State Standards (see extensions)

Preparations

1. Administer KWL Diagnostic prior to this lesson (see extensions).
2. Gather materials.
3. Begin making contacts to enlist three speakers for Days 5-7. Make arrangements to provide each speaker with a Speaker Guide (see associated file). The speakers may be people within the school environment, parents, or people from the community. For example, the P.E. teacher could speak on physical fitness, the school nurse could speak on cleanliness/personal hygiene, and a parent who also happens to be a pediatrician could speak about relaxation and sleep.
4. Download and make a copy of the Hound Dog picture (see associated file).
5. Download and make a copy of Unit Vocabulary and Meanings (see extensions).
6. Download and make a copy of Unit standards (see extensions).
7. Download and make a copy of the Problem Scenario (see associated file).
8. Download and make a transparency of the Action Plan (see associated file).
9. Glue Unit Vocabulary and Meanings to construction paper and laminate for more durability. Cut them out, so they are each on their own paper and large enough for students to read.
10. Glue Unit standards to construction paper and laminate for more durability. Cut them out.
11. Decide upon an area in the classroom (i.e., wall, bulletin board, etc.) to post the unit vocabulary words/meanings and standards.
12. Download and make copies of Sample Skit Scenarios, one per participant (see associated file).
13. Download and make copies of Speaker Guides, one per speaker (see associated file).
14. After the lesson, enlist student volunteers to perform skits on Day 5 of the unit.
15. Download and make copies of the Note to Parents (see associated file). Staple the papers together.

Procedures

Before the lesson:

1. Administer the KWL Diagnostic (see extensions) prior to this lesson.

2. Begin making arrangements for speakers on Days 5-7 (see #3 Teacher Preparation).

3. Prior to this lesson, make a Health Hound folder for each student. Do this by folding 12” x 18” construction paper in half along the 18” edge.

During the lesson:

Vocabulary: All vocabulary words

1. Display a picture of a hound dog (see associated file) and draw attention to it.

2. Ask the class to predict how the hound dog picture might relate to today’s health lesson.

3. After students take turns responding, wave a piece of paper with the Problem Scenario (see associated file) printed on it in front of students.

4. Explain that you have received a letter from a friend. Your friend wrote that her class at Wellington Elementary is having a difficult time.

5. Read the Problem Scenario about Wellington Elementary (see associated file).

6. Tell the students your friend has contacted you because she knows you are a “health hound.”

7. Elaborate as to why you might be considered a “health hound” and what being a “health hound” means. Possible comments might include: She thinks I’m a health hound because I’m always telling her things to do to stay healthy.

8. Explain that the class is beginning a new unit on health called Wellness Wonders.

9. Challenge students to become “health hounds” and learn about health so they can help the students at Wellington.

10. Share the Unit standards with students (see extensions).

11. Display the standards on a bulletin board or some other prominent space in the classroom.

12. Introduce and discuss the Unit Vocabulary (see extensions). Ask student volunteers to place the vocabulary cards on the Big Word Wall.
Note - Excellent strategies for developing vocabulary can be found at the Just Read Now site located at http://www.justreadnow.com/index.htm.

13. Explain that during the unit students will learn strategies for improving or maintaining personal health. Locate the vocabulary card for the word strategy on the Big Word Wall and ask a student volunteer to read its meaning.

14. Guide students in brainstorming examples of strategies. Examples might include: think about what you want to accomplish and set a goal, gather information and become informed, create a plan, make a list of things to do, work towards the goal, etc. Record student responses on the board or chart paper.

15. Point to the vocabulary card for the word goal on the Big Word Wall. Explain that one strategy to improve or maintain personal health is to set a goal. Record set a goal as a strategy on the board or chart paper.

16. Tell students your goal for this unit is for them to succeed with these standards. To help the class make progress towards this goal, you used another strategy. You created an Action Plan (see associated file). Record create an action plan as a strategy on the board or chart paper.

17. Explain that an action plan lists steps a person can take to make progress towards reaching a goal.

18. Display the Action Plan transparency (see associated file) and discuss the steps.

19. Relate that sometimes with a task or job, there is a need to enlist (or ask for) help from others. This is another strategy that can be used to improve or maintain personal health. Add enlist help from others to the list of strategies previously recorded.

20. Ask students to review the Action Plan and brainstorm when and how the teacher might enlist or ask for help from others during the unit.

21. Record student responses on a chart or the board. Guide students in realizing that help can be enlisted through a variety of methods (orally face to face, orally by telephone, written emails, notes/letters, etc.).

22. Share examples of how you actually enlisted help from others for the unit plan (i.e., notes/phone calls to schedule speakers, emailed the media specialist for resources, orally asking the lunchroom helpers or parents for assistance, orally asking students to perform skits, etc.)

23. Explain that during the unit students will have opportunities to practice strategies to improve or maintain personal health and enlist help from others.

24. Review vocabulary words, examples of strategies, and ways to enlist help from others by asking student volunteers to reread ideas previously recorded and posted.

25. Tell students now they will apply what they have learned by doing an activity called Think-Pair-Share.

26. Explain the Think-Pair-Share process:
· First, students self-reflect and think of a personal health goal and action plan for the new unit. Guiding questions might include:
What do I want to learn?
Do I have a health related problem that I want to learn about?
Do I have health habits that need to improve?
What steps can I take to reach my goal?
How can I enlist help from others to reach my goal?
· Next, students select a partner and share ideas.
· Finally, students return to a whole group arrangement and discuss the experience. (Note -During the discussion, the teacher provides formative feedback that is both guiding and positive. Guiding feedback might include, “I see your goal is to brush your teeth more. Can you tell how often you plan to brush them?” Positive feedback might include, “Good thinking! I’m sure your mom would be a great help to you since she is a nurse.”)

27. Distribute Health Hound Handout 1. Read and discuss the directions. Model possible responses using the Health Hound Handout 1 Key (see associated file).

28. Share the criteria for assessment:
· The student identifies a realistic personal health goal.
· The student writes a 1-2 step action plan that will help him/her reach the goal.
· The student identifies a way to ask others for help in reaching the goal.
· The student tracks personal progress on the Action Plan Chart for a period of seven days.

29. Students complete the handouts.

30. Distribute construction paper folders (made prior to the lesson).

31. Allow time for students to label the outside with the words “Health Hound” and their names. If time permits, students may draw/color pictures on the front.

32. Ask students to file Health Hound Handout 1 in the folder and collect the folders.

33. Formatively assess Health Hound Handout 1 and provide positive and guiding feedback. Positive feedback might include, “I think it’s great that you want to learn more about healthy foods.” Guiding feedback might include, “Can you think of someone in our school who might be able to help you learn about healthy foods?”

After the lesson:
1. Enlist student volunteers to do skits for Day 5 of the unit. Provide students with a skit scenario (see Sample Skit Scenarios in associated file) and encourage them to practice and establish appropriate practice times during the school day. Note - The teacher is encouraged to create additional skit scenarios if more are needed.
2. Distribute copies of the Note to Parents (see associated file), one per student. Students are to take the letters home to their parents to inform them of the new unit.

Assessments

Health Hound Handout 1 is formatively assessed based on the following criteria:
· The student identifies a realistic personal health goal.
· The student writes a 1-2 step action plan that will help him/her reach the goal.
· The student identifies a way to ask others for help in reaching the goal.
· The student tracks personal progress on the Action Plan Chart for a period of seven days.

Extensions

1. The Beacon Unit Plan associated with this lesson can be viewed by clicking on the link located at the top of this page or by using the following URL:
http://www.beaconlearningcenter.com/search/details.asp?item=4846. Once you select the unit’s link, scroll to the bottom of the unit plans page to find the section, Associated Files. This section contains links to the Unit Plan Overview, Diagnostic and Summative Assessments, and other associated files (if any).
2. Additional reference materials for this unit may be located using Sunlink, a database for Florida teachers. The Web address for Sunlink is: http://www.sunlink.ucf.edu/
3. Action Plan Charts could be posted around the room as a visual reminder to students to complete the action steps each day.

Web Links

Students can explore nutrition information on this fun Website.
Nutrition Explorations

Lots of health information presented in a fun way.
Bam! Body and Mind

This site has nutrition information and resources for teachers.
Dole 5 A Day

Many resources concerning the food guide pyramid are located at this site.
The Food Guide Pyramid

Nutrition information for kids.
Kids Food Cyber Club

Factual information about children's health topics.
Kids Health

Investigate the nutritional values of various foods at this site.
Food Finder

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