Beacon Lesson Plan Library

Listen and Learn

Laurie Ayers
Bay District Schools

Description

This lesson is for Day 2 of the unit [Wellness Wonders]. Students participate in a listening game and brainstorm ways to communicate health information and ideas.

Objectives

The student knows various methods for communicating health information and ideas (eg., through oral or written reports).

The student listens attentively to the speaker (including but not limited to making eye contact and facing the speaker).

Materials

-Board space or chart paper
-Board markers or markers for chart paper
-Unit standards, previously posted in the classroom
-Piece of paper with the statement “Apples and bananas are tasty fruits.” written on it.
-Notebook paper, one per student for exit slip activity
-Pencil, one per student
-Examples of ways health information and ideas can be communicated.
Possible examples might include: reference books (see Reference List in extensions), a Food Pyramid Guide poster (see Weblinks), brochures from the public health department about proper hand washing techniques, dental health brochures, teacher made videotape of a health related commercial, newspaper articles (see Weblinks), etc.
-Role-playing Notes, three copies (see associated file)

Preparations

1. Write a statement for the listening game on a piece of paper (Ex. - Apples and bananas are tasty fruits.)
2. Gather materials.
3. If needed, download and make copies of online newspaper articles about health (see Weblinks).
4. Download and make copies of Role-playing Notes (see associated file).
5. Tape a health related television commercial (optional).

Procedures

Prior to the lesson:
1. Enlist the help of three student volunteers to be role players.

2. Provide the students with a copy of the Role-playing Notes (see associated file) and time to become familiar with the skits.

During the lesson:
1. Review with students the name of the unit and the problem scenario.

2. Review the need to gather health information in order to help the students at Wellington Elementary.

3. Brainstorm ways health information can be communicated. Begin discussion by asking guiding question such as:
· If there was a contagious disease going around in our community, how might we find out about it?
· If you needed to write a report on nutrition, where would you look for information?

4. Record student responses on the board or chart paper.

5. Guide students in realizing that health information can be communicated in a variety of ways (for example, written, orally, electronically).

6. Show examples of ways health information can be communicated. Possible examples might include a Food Pyramid Guide poster (see Weblinks), brochures from the public health department about proper hand washing techniques, dental health brochures, teacher made videotape of a health related commercial, newspaper articles (see Weblinks), etc.

7. Point to standards.

8. Read the standards.

9. Explain that speakers have been invited to come to the class to share health information orally.

10. Today’s lesson will help students learn good listening skills in preparation for the speaker talks.

11. To begin, ask students to stand and form a circle.

12. Tell students you have written a statement on a piece of paper. A sample statement might be: Apples and bananas are tasty fruits.

13. Show students the paper, but do not let them read what is written.

14. Explain that you will whisper the statement that is written on the paper to the person next to you.

15. That person will listen to what you say and then whisper what they heard to the next person. The message is only spoken once.

16. Each person will whisper (once only) what he/she hears to the next person until the last person whispers the statement back to the teacher.

17. Encourage students to listen intently and try to pass on exactly what they hear.

18. Continue the activity until the final student repeats the statement back to the teacher.

19. The teacher calls upon various students to repeat the statement they heard out loud.

20. Allow time for students to discuss any incongruence.

21. The teacher then verbalizes loud enough for all to hear the statement the last student whispered to her.

22. Again, allow time for discussion.

23. Ask students if they’d like to know the original statement the teacher repeated to the first student (the one written on the paper).

24. Read the written statement to students.

25. Encourage student discussion about how the message may have been misinterpreted and lead students in realizing how important it is to listen intently.

26. Ask students to return to their seats.

27. Explain that in today’s lesson, students will learn characteristics of effective listening.

28. Encourage students to think silently about qualities of a good listener.

29. Call on the three previously selected student volunteers to come to the front of the room and role-play.

30. Using the Role-playing Notes for Skit 1 provided in the associated file, one student acts like a teacher presenting a lesson and the other two students act as if they are not listening and paying attention.

31. After about 30 seconds, thank the student actors and have them return to their seats.

32. Guide the class in discussing what they observed. Guiding questions might include:
What was the setting of this skit?
What roles were the actors playing?
Describe the behaviors you observed.

33. Guide students in identifying behaviors the actors portrayed as non-listening behaviors (i.e., squirmed in seats, talked while the speaker was talking, did not face the speaker, did not make eye contact with the speaker, etc.).

34. List the behaviors on the board or chart paper.

35. Call on three different volunteers to role-play.

36. Using the Role-playing Notes (see associated file) for Skit 2, the students act as if they are in a classroom, the teacher is presenting a lesson, and the two students are listening intently.

37. After about 30 seconds, thank the student actors and have them return to their seats.

38. Allow time for the class to discuss what they observed. Guiding questions might include:
What was the setting of this skit?
What roles were the actors playing?
How was this skit different from the first skit?
Describe the behaviors of the students.

39. Guide students in identifying characteristics of good listeners (i.e., face the speaker, make eye contact with the speaker, do not talk, do not distract others, etc.). Tell them to listen well and pay attention since they will be completing exit slips at the end of the lesson and may need this information.

40. Record characteristics of a good listener on a chart. Post the chart in the classroom.

41. Inform students that throughout the unit they will have many opportunities to practice effective listening skills. These same criteria will be used to assess student performance.

42. Students complete an exit slip at the end of the day listing ways health information can be communicated and criteria of effective listening. (Exit slips may be written on scrap paper, index cards, regular notebook paper, etc. Exit slips are handed to the teacher for assessment as students "exit" the classroom.)

43. Formatively assess exit slips for evidence the student knows ways to communicate health information and criteria for effective listening. Provide feedback that is both positive and guiding. Positive feedback might include, “Great job! It is important to face the speaker and make eye contact.” Guiding feedback might include, “Yes, health ideas can be communicated in a written report. How will our visiting speakers communicate health information?”

Assessments

Students complete an exit slip upon leaving in the afternoon. The exit slips are formatively assessed for evidence that the student knows two ways health ideas can be communicated and at least two characteristics of effective listeners.

Extensions

1. The Beacon Unit Plan associated with this lesson can be viewed by clicking on the link located at the top of this page or by using the following URL:
http://www.beaconlearningcenter.com/search/details.asp?item=4846. Once you select the unit’s link, scroll to the bottom of the unit plans page to find the section, Associated Files. This section contains links to the Unit Plan Overview, Diagnostic and Summative Assessments, and other associated files (if any).

2. Note: Before playing any games suggested in this lesson, make sure all students who will be involved are capable of playing. If necessary, amend the procedures so that each child will be successful in participating, having a good time, and experiencing the skills targeted.

Web Links

Download and print a food pyramid poster.
Food Pyramid Poster

Attached Files

Role-playing Notes.     File Extension: pdf

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