Beacon Lesson Plan Library

Survey Savvy

Laurie Ayers
Bay District Schools

Description

This is a math lesson for Days 4 and 5 of the unit [Wellness Wonders]. Students design appropriate questions for a survey, survey classmates, create a pictograph to represent the results, and explain the survey results.

Objectives

The student designs appropriate questions for a survey.

The student creates a pictograph or bar graph to present data from a given survey.

The student explains the results from the data of a given survey.

Materials

-Chart paper, dry erase board, or overhead and overhead transparency
-Markers or Vis a Vis pen
-Survey Steps, one copy to post and one transparency (see associated file)
-Breakfast Survey, one per student (see associated file)
-Survey Tally Chart, one copy (see associated file)
-Sample Survey Results, one copy (see associated file)
-Steps for Making a Pictograph, one copy to post and one transparency (see associated file)
-Survey Savvy, one per student (see associated file)
-Food Pictograph handouts, one per student (see associated file)
-Tom Snyder’s Graph It software program (optional)
-Computer connected to a large screen monitor (optional)
-Vocabulary Words and Meanings: survey, pictograph (previously downloaded on Day 2)
-Overhead projector

Preparations


1. Gather materials.
2. Download and make a copy of the Survey Steps chart to be posted in the classroom and a transparency of the chart to be used during instruction (see associated file).
3. Download and make copies of the Breakfast Survey, one per student (see associated file).
4. Download and make a copy of the Tally Chart (see associated file).
5. Download and make a copy of the Sample Survey Results (see associated file).
6. Download and make copies of Steps for Making a Pictograph, one to be posted as a reference in the classroom, one as a transparency to be used during instruction, and one copy for each student (see associated file).
7. Download and make copies of Survey Savvy, one per student (see associated file).
8. Determine a signal for step 3, Day 5 (Procedures).
9. Download and make copies of the Food Pictograph handout, one per student (see associated file).
10. Begin collecting travel size shampoo samples for the math lesson entitled Shampoo Shake on Days 6 and 7. Three samples for each group of 5-6 students are needed. Consider asking students and co-workers to contribute.

Procedures

Vocabulary – survey, pictograph

Day 4
1. Ask students if they think all their classmates like the same foods.

2. Ask students if they can think of a way to find out.

3. Students brainstorm ideas.

4. Record student ideas on chart paper or a dry erase board. Accept all reasonable responses.

5. Guide students in realizing that one way to gather data (or information) is to take a survey.

6. Define the word survey using the Vocabulary Words and Meanings (previously downloaded on Day 2) as a questioning technique used to gather data.

7. Using an overhead projector and the Survey Steps transparency (see associated file), explain the steps involved in taking a survey. (Note - Post a printed copy of the steps in the classroom for future reference.)

8. Inform students that in the next few days they will learn how to design appropriate questions for surveys, tally and present survey results in a pictograph, and explain the survey results.

9. Tell students you want to gather some information about their breakfast habits.

10. Explain that one way to gather this data would be to take a survey.

11. The first step in taking a survey is to decide what questions need to be asked to gather the desired information.

12. Write the following questions on the board or chart paper:
a. Did you eat breakfast this morning?
b. What do you eat for breakfast?

13. Ask the above questions of the class. Record responses.

14. Guide students in recognizing the responses to question (a) are limited to yes and no, while the responses to question (b) are more varied.

15. Tell students for the purpose of this unit, it is best to ask survey questions that limit the number of possible responses (such as either/or, yes/no questions). This will make it easier to understand and display survey results.

16. Ask students to brainstorm survey questions about breakfast that are in an either/or format or yes/no format. Possible responses might include: Would you rather eat waffles or cereal? Do you prefer whole milk or skim milk? Which do you like better, orange juice or apple juice? Is breakfast your favorite meal?

17. Record student generated survey questions. Provide formative feedback as needed.

18. Think aloud and tell students if you want to know how many students ate breakfast, your survey question might be: Did you eat breakfast this morning?

19. Distribute copies of Breakfast Survey (see associated file) to students.

20. Students read the survey question and respond.

21. Explain that the next step would be to tally the results.

22. Take up the surveys and ask student volunteers to help tally the results. Record the numbers on the Tally Chart (see associated file).

23. Tell students in order to explain the results of a given survey, one must follow these steps:
· Read the data.
· Compare the data.

24. Model how to explain the results by asking guiding questions such as:
· How many students ate breakfast this morning?
· How many students did not eat breakfast this morning?
· Looking at this data, would you say more or less students in the class ate breakfast?

25. Model how to explain the results of the Breakfast Survey. For instance, if the survey data was 19 students – Yes, 6 students – No, statements might be include:
· More students ate breakfast than those who did not.
· Most students in our class ate breakfast this morning.
· Six students out of twenty-five did not eat breakfast this morning.
· Nineteen students out of twenty-five did eat breakfast this morning.

26. Using the Sample Survey Results (see associated file), record the sample survey results on the board or chart paper.

27. Call on student volunteers to make statements explaining the results. Provide formative feedback that is both positive and guiding. Positive feedback might include: That’s correct. According to this survey, 22 out of 25 students brushed their teeth before coming to school on the day of the survey. Guiding feedback might include: Look again. Is 22 more than 25 or less than 25?

28. Explain that survey results can also be displayed in a pictograph to make the results easier to see and understand. A pictograph uses pictures to represent data collected.

29. Call on a student volunteer to add the pictograph word and meaning (previously downloaded on Day 2) to the Big Word Wall.

30. Guide students in discussing symbols that could be used to represent the data collected. Possible symbols might include smiley faces or stick persons.

31. Lead students in determining how many people each symbol might represent. Explain that sometimes if the tally number is high, the symbol can represent more than one. Model examples such as each smiley face = 2 students or each stick person = 3 students. Point out that the value of the symbol must be consistent. Also, guide students in arriving at how many half of the symbol represents.

32. Display the Steps for Making a Pictograph transparency and discuss the steps (see associated file). (Note – Also post a printed copy of the steps in the classroom for future reference.)

33. Using chart paper, dry erase board, overhead transparency, or computer software program such as Tom Snyder’s Graph It, model how to show the collected data on a pictograph using the steps outlined in the chart.

34. Tell students now it is their turn. They are to create a survey question to find out more about which foods students in the class like, dislike, or are favorites.

35. Divide students into five small groups. Assign a food group to each small group (bread, cereal, rice and pasta group, fruit group, vegetable group, milk, yogurt, and cheese group, and meat, poultry, fish, dry beans, eggs, and nut group).

36. Distribute a copy of the Survey Savvy handout to each group (see associated file).

37. Each small group designs a survey question related to food preferences in that food group.

38. For instance, one survey question might be, “Which do you like better, chocolate milk or plain milk?”

39. Allow time for each group to design a survey question related to their food group.

40. Each student records the question on the Survey Savvy handout. The handouts will be used on the following day to survey their classmates.

41. Take up the Survey Savvy handouts.

42. Formatively assess the handouts to determine if the survey question is appropriate and relates to food preferences. Provide positive and guiding feedback. Positive feedback might include, “Great job! Your question will help us determine the vegetables your classmates prefer.” Guiding feedback might include, “Your question is about food, but will it help us learn more about which fruits your classmates prefer?”

43. Provide assistance to any small group that is having difficulty creating an appropriate survey question before Day 5.

Day 5

1. Return Survey Savvy papers to the students. Allow time for the students to self-reflect upon the formative feedback.

2. Tell students today they will get the opportunity to use their survey question to survey fellow classmates.

3. Explain that when a signal is given, students are to survey at least 10 classmates. Classmate responses are recorded on the Survey Savvy handout by each student’s name.

4. Students will then tally the survey results using the Survey Tally Chart (see associated file).

5. Give the designated signal. Allow time for students to survey each other and tally the results.

6. After a suitable amount of time, students return to their desks.

7. Review Steps for Making a Pictograph chart (see associated file).

8. Distribute copies of the Food Pictograph handout to students (see associated file).

9. Students follow the steps to create a pictograph on the Food Pictograph handout (see associated file).

10. Facilitate students and provide formative feedback during this time.

11. Upon completion, students return to their small groups.

12. Review the steps in explaining the results of a given survey.

13. Students take turns explaining the results of their surveys as represented on their pictographs to others within the small group.

14. Collect the Food Pictograph handouts.

15. Formatively assess the Food Pictograph handouts using the criteria listed in the Steps for Making a Pictograph chart (see associated file). Sentences explaining the results of the survey are assessed according to accuracy in reflecting the data gathered. Provide positive and guiding feedback. Positive feedback might include, “Great job! You followed all the steps to complete your pictograph.” Guiding feedback might include, “ Look at the steps for making a pictograph. Did you leave something out?”

Assessments

Survey Savvy handouts are formatively assessed for evidence the student designs an appropriate question for the survey. Survey questions should relate to identifying food preferences of classmates.
Food Pictograph handouts are formatively assessed based on the criteria listed in the Steps to Making a Pictograph chart. Sentences explaining the results of the survey are assessed according to accuracy in reflecting the data gathered.

Extensions

1. The Beacon Unit Plan associated with this lesson can be viewed by clicking on the link located at the top of this page or by using the following URL:
http://www.beaconlearningcenter.com/search/details.asp?item=4846.
Once you select the unit’s link, scroll to the bottom of the unit plan page to find the section, Associated Files. This section contains links to the Unit Plan Overview, Diagnostic and Summative Assessments, and other associated files (if any).
2. An alternative strategy might be to divide students into 6 groups. Each group represents a different food group and comes up with a survey question for that food group. For example, "Did you eat candy yesterday?" or "Do you drink milk everyday?" The group does the survey together. Each person in the group then creates a pictograph. This allows students to share information and do the same pictograph.
3. Excel could be used to create pictographs.

Web Links

Click [Sound Out], then [Bigger Surveys]. Students can participate in weekly surveys, explore and analyze survey results, use the data to formulate hypotheses, and locate information that supports or refutes the hypotheses.
Zoom for Kids, by Kids

Students can participate in weekly surveys.
Absolutely Whootie: Stories to Grow By

Click [Surveys] on the left side. Students can respond to survey questions and see survey results displayed in graphs.
Recipes 4 Learning

Presents data of the survey and implications of the data. May be used by the teacher to establish the importance of good health habits.
California Children’s Healthy Eating and Exercise Practices Survey

Return to the Beacon Lesson Plan Library.