Beacon Lesson Plan Library

Food for Thought

Laurie Ayers
Bay District Schools

Description

This language arts lesson is for Day 6 of the unit [Wellness Wonders]. Students play a fact and opinion game concerning foods.

Objectives

The student distinguishes fact from opinions in newspapers, magazines, and other media.

Materials

-[Bingo] song, one copy for teacher use if needed (see associated file)
-Food for Thought game cards, one set per pair of students (see associated file)
-Game board for Food for Thought Bingo, one per student (see associated file)
-Answer Key for Food for Thought game card statements (see associated file)
-Food for Thought handout, one per student (see associated file)

Preparations

1. Gather materials.
2. Download and make a copy of the song [Bingo] (see associated file).
3. Download and make copies of the Food for Thought game cards (see associated file), one set per pair of students.
4. Download and make copies of the Food for Thought game boards (see associated file), one per student.
5. Download and make copies of the Food for Thought handout (see associated file), one per student.
6. Glue Food for Thought game cards and game boards for Food for Thought Bingo onto sturdier paper such as tag board or construction paper.
7. Laminate Food for Thought game cards and game boards for durability.
8. Cut out each set of Food for Thought game cards (one set per pair of students), stack them, and secure with a rubber band.
9. Cut out the game boards (one per student).
10. Begin gathering copies of a local newspaper for the language arts lesson for Day 7, one copy for the teacher and one copy per pair of students. The newspapers do not have to be the most recent issue, so students whose parents have subscriptions could bring newspapers from home.

Procedures

1. Optional - Lead the class in singing the song [Bingo]. Words for the song can be found in the associated file.

2. Ask students if they have ever played a bingo game.

3. Explain that today students will play a bingo game to practice what they have learned about facts and opinions.

4. Review definitions for fact and opinion previously taught on Day 5. A fact is a statement that can be proven and is certain. It doesn’t change. An opinion is a statement of how one thinks, believes, or feels. Different persons have different opinions.

5. Draw a T chart on the board. Label one side Fact, the other Opinion.

6. Call on student volunteers to share fact and opinion statements. Record student responses and provide formative feedback as needed.

7. Tell students today they will play a game called [Food for Thought].

8. Pair students or allow students to choose a partner.

9. Distribute Food for Thought game cards (see associated file). Each pair of students receives one set of cards (either Set 1 or Set 2). Note- Two sets of game cards are provided. Student pairs in close proximity to one another might need different sets of cards.

10. Distribute game boards for Food for Thought Bingo (see associated file), one per student.

11. Students in each pair take turns. One student draws a game card, reads it aloud, and then decides if the statement on the card is a food fact or a food opinion. If it is a food fact, the student places the card on the word Fact on his/her game board. If the statement is an opinion, the game card is placed on the word Opinion on the student’s game board. The first student to get three facts or three opinions in a row on his/her game board says “Bingo” and is the winner. An answer key is provided (see associated file) so the student not taking a turn can check his/her partner’s answers.

12. Provide time for students to play the game. Encourage students to play the game more than once if time permits.

13. Observe students playing the game and provide formative feedback as needed.

14. Take up game materials.

15. Review the meaning of media and how distinguishing fact from opinion can be beneficial when a person is exposed to media relating to health.

16. Distribute the Food for Thought: Pizza Fact/Opinion Worksheet handout (see associated file).

17. Read aloud the directions and ask students if they have any questions.

18. Students complete the Food for Thought handout (see associated file).

19. Formatively assess Food for Thought handouts and provide feedback that is both positive and guiding. Positive feedback might include, “Great thinking. You seem to know the difference between facts and opinions.” Guiding feedback might include, “I understand that you think pizza is good hot or cold, but do you think everyone does? Think again. Is this a fact or an opinion?”

Assessments

Food for Thought handouts are formatively assessed for evidence the student can successfully distinguish fact from opinion with 75% or higher accuracy.

Extensions

1. The Beacon Unit Plan associated with this lesson can be viewed by clicking on the link located at the top of this page or by using the following URL:
http://www.beaconlearningcenter.com/search/details.asp?item=4846.
Once you select the unit’s link, scroll to the bottom of the unit plans page to find the section, Associated Files. This section contains links to the Unit Plan Overview, Diagnostic and Summative Assessments, and other associated files (if any).
2. For homework, ask students to locate facts and opinions in magazines or newspapers.
3. Students can work in pairs to complete fact and opinion quizzes at the suggested Weblinks.
4. Ask students whose parents subscribe to the local newspaper to bring in a copy of a newspaper for the next language arts lesson.
5. Keep the cards found in the associated file to use in a center to reinforce the concept.

Web Links

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Facts and Opinions

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