Beacon Lesson Plan Library

Media Moves

Laurie Ayers
Bay District Schools

Description

This lesson is for Day 7 of the unit [Wellness Wonders]. Students examine various media to identify ways the media influence thoughts and feelings about health behaviors.

Objectives

The student knows how the media influence thoughts and feelings about health behavior.

The student distinguishes fact from opinions in newspapers, magazines, and other media.

Materials

-Newspapers, one copy for teacher use and one copy per pair of students
-Two pre-selected health related passages from a newspaper, one written to inform and one written to convince or persuade (see Weblinks for possible sources)
-Several pre-selected health related passages from various media such as magazines, product catalogs, newspapers, brochures, dental health booklets, etc., some written to inform, others written to convince or persuade (see Weblinks for possible sources)
-Two different colored highlighters, one set per pair of students

Preparations

1. Gather materials.
2. Pre-select two health related passages in a newspaper. One passage should be to inform, the other to persuade or convince (see Weblinks).
3. Pre-select health related passages in various forms of media (magazines, newspapers, brochures, booklets, catalogs, etc. – see Weblinks). Other possible sources might include the school nurse, district health resource teacher, district media center, or county health department Website.
4. Preview newspapers and other media and remove any inappropriate pictures or content before distributing them to students.

Procedures

1. Walk to the front of the room waving a newspaper.

2. Tell students in today’s lesson they will use a newspaper to learn how media influence thoughts and feelings about health behaviors.

3. Review the definition of media on the Big Word Wall and relate to present knowledge by asking questions such as:
Have you ever read a newspaper?
What kind of information can be found in a newspaper?
What is the purpose of a newspaper?

4. Read two pre-selected health related passages from the newspaper. One passage should contain information to inform the reader (This might be an article about the health benefits of walking.). The other passage should contain information to convince or persuade the reader (This might be an ad for a gymnastics club.) Samples are provided (see Weblinks).

5. Guide students in discussing the differences in the two passages and recognizing that newspapers and other forms of media can influence thoughts and feelings in several ways.

6. Write the words inform and convince (or persuade) on the board or chart paper.

7. Point to the word, inform, and tell students one way media can influence thoughts and feelings is to provide information or inform individuals.

8. Read an example of informative media such as a poster about hand washing (see Weblinks).

9. Point to the word, convince which means persuade, and tell students another way media can influence thoughts and feelings is to try and convince or persuade individuals about something. Read an example of media trying to convince such as an advertisement for a gymnastics club (see Weblinks).

10. Explain it is important for students to recognize how media (newspapers, videos, magazines, television, radio, etc.) influence thoughts and feelings about health behaviors so students can make wise choices concerning their health.

11. Tell students the class will play a game. As the teacher reads passages from various media, students are to decide if the purpose of the passage is to inform or convince.

12. Students listen to the passages. If the purpose of the passage is to inform, the students clap their hands two times. If the purpose of the passage is to convince or persuade, students click their fingers two times.

13. Read several health related passages (several online resources are listed in Weblinks) and allow for student responses.

14. Discuss and provide formative feedback when needed.

15. Tell students it is time for them to use what they have learned.

16. Pair students.

17. Distribute a newspaper and two different colored highlighters to each pair of students. (Note: Make sure the pages given to students contain appropriate materials--no pictures of liquor, etc.)

18. Explain that students are to go on a newspaper scavenger hunt.

19. Each pair of students is to locate and highlight two examples of how the newspaper is used to inform the reader and two examples of how the newspaper is used to convince the reader.

20. Provide time for student pairs to complete the activity.

21. Student pairs take turns sharing one of each type of highlighted passage.

22. As students share, ask them to identify a factual statement in the passages and an opinion statement in the passages if possible.

23. Formatively assess student responses for evidence student pairs accurately identify ways the media influence thoughts and feelings about health behaviors and fact and opinions. Provide feedback that is both positive and guiding. Positive feedback might include, “Yes, that is correct. This passage has many facts to inform us about the new sleep study.” Guiding feedback might include, “ Think again about the statement, ‘Look ten pounds thinner.’ Do you think the purpose of this statement is to inform the reader or to convince the reader? Is it a fact or an opinion?”

Assessments

Formatively assess responses shared by student pairs for accuracy in identifying one newspaper passage intended to inform and one newspaper passage intended to convince or persuade.

Extensions

1. The Beacon Unit Plan associated with this lesson can be viewed by clicking on the link located at the top of this page or by using the following URL:
http://www.beaconlearningcenter.com/search/details.asp?item= 4846.
Once you select the unit’s link, scroll to the bottom of the unit plans page to find the section, Associated Files. This section contains links to the Unit Plan Overview, Diagnostic and Summative Assessments, and other associated files (if any).

2. The article from the Billings Gazette listed in the Weblinks section above has good examples of facts and opinions.

3. Make sure students are ready to be assessed on fact/opinion. For those who may need a little extra help, prepare four fact/opinion statements on index cards and just quickly ask the student to read one silently and state if it is fact or opinion. Give feedback to reinforce correct answers and model "thinking aloud" if the student gives an incorrect answer.

4. Preview the newspapers and remove any inappropriate pictures or content before distributing them to students.

Web Links

Links to many health magazines, periodicals, journals, and newspapers
Newspaper World

Newspaper article entitled [Wider program sought after students warm to free fruit, vegetables experiment] by Robert Gehrke, Billings Gazette, Associated Press, June 2, 2003. Enter the date of the article in the past issues search. The article appears under the Health heading.
Billings Gazette

Brochures with health information
Center for Nutrition Policy and Promotion

Brochures with health information
Center for Nutrition Policy and Promotion

Journals on food and nutrition
U. S. Dept. of Agriculture

Information about washing hands
MSU Cares

Poster on hand washing techniques
Metro Kansas City

FDA (00-2311) brochure: Eating for a Healthy Heart
Food and Drug Administration

Media site with advertisements written to convince
Starlight Gymnastics

Media site with advertisements written to convince
Nordic Track

Media site with advertisements to convince
Mind, Body, Spirit Marketplace

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