Beacon Lesson Plan Library

Guest Performance

Laurie Ayers
Bay District Schools

Description

This lesson is for Day 8 of the unit [Wellness Wonders]. Students use pretend television performances to practice how the media influence thoughts and feelings about health behaviors and distinguishing fact from opinion.

Objectives

The student knows how the media influence thoughts and feelings about health behavior.

The student distinguishes fact from opinions in newspapers, magazines, and other media.

Materials

-Large cardboard box, cut to resemble a television set
-Highlighters, one per student
-Two different colored highlighters for teacher use
-Fruity Puff Cereal Jingle, one copy (see associated file)
-A box of fruit flavored cereal such as Fruit Loops™ with the Fruity Puff Cereal label glued to the front (see associated file)
-Small bathroom cups or a snack size baggie, one per student
-Online article [Cereal Eaters Get More Nutrients, More Fiber, Less Fat] from Doctor’s Guide located at http://www.docguide.com, one copy per student (see Weblinks)
-Fruity Puff Commercial, one copy (see associated file)
-Quicker Cereal Survey, one copy (see associated file)
-Commercial Copy handout, one per student (see associated file)
-Newsflash Notes handout, one per student (see associated file)
-Media Mania handout, one per student (see associated file)
-Media Mania Key, one copy (see associated file)

Preparations

1. Gather materials.
2. Download and make a copy of Fruity Puff Cereal Jingle (see associated file).
3. Download and make a copy of the Fruity Puff Cereal Label (see associated file) and glue it onto the front of a box of fruit flavored cereal.
4. Download and make copies of the online article [Cereal Eaters Get More Nutrients, More Fiber, Less Fat] from Doctor’s Guide located at http://www.docguide.com, one copy per student (see associated file).
5. Download and make a copy of the Fruity Puff Commercial and the Quicker Cereal Survey (see associated file).
6. Download and make copies of Commercial Copy handouts, one per pair of students (see associated file).
7. Download and make copies of Newsflash Notes handouts, one per pair of students (see associated file).
8. Download and make copies of Media Mania handouts, one per student (see associated file).
9. Download and make a copy of Media Mania Key (see associated file).

Procedures

1. Stand behind a large cardboard box made to look like a television.

2. Sing the Fruity Puff Cereal Jingle and hold a box of cereal labeled as Fruity Puffs (see associated file).

3. Come from behind the box and ask students if they’d like to try some Fruity Puffs.

4. Distribute small containers of cereal to students.

5. Ask students to think about the television commercial as they eat the cereal.

6. Explain that television, like newspapers and magazines, is a medium for communication. It can be used to inform and to convince or persuade.

7. Ask students to brainstorm aspects of television that inform (for example, nightly news broadcasts, documentaries, emergency newsflashes, special events, etc.)

8. Ask students to brainstorm aspects of television that convince or persuade (for example, commercials, info ads, etc.).

9. Review fact and opinion. Emphasize the need to distinguish fact from opinion in media.

10. Display a copy of the Fruity Puff Jingle (see associated file).

11. Call on student volunteers to identify fact/opinion statements in the jingle.

12. Highlight the facts and opinions in the jingle using different colored highlighters.

13. Ask students if they think the overall intent of the commercial was to inform or convince. Establish that the intent of the commercial was to convince students to eat Fruity Puff Cereal.

14. Explain that media can also inform students about health behaviors.

15. Read aloud the online article [Cereal Eaters Get More Nutrients, More Fiber, Less Fat] from Doctor’s Guide located at http://www.docguide.com (see associated file). Note - Since this article has a high readability level, this would be an opportune time to model think aloud for comprehension.

16. Guide students in discussing the article.

17. Distribute copies of the article to students.

18. Review fact and opinion.

19. Students use highlighters to identify three facts in the article. Note - Feel free to adjust this activity based on the ability levels of your students. Scaffolding procedures may need to be incorporated such as pairing students or dividing them into small groups.

20. Draw a Venn diagram on the board.

21. Guide students in comparing/contrasting information in the Fruity Puff commercial with information in the online article. Ask guiding questions such as:
How was information presented in the commercial? Was there music? Were there any pictures? What was the mood?
How was information presented in the online article? Were there any pictures? How was this information different from information in the commercial?

22. Review how the information in the commercial was intended to convince and the information in the article was intended to inform.

23. Ask students if they’d like to be a guest performer on your television.

24. Divide students into pairs.

25. Explain students are to pretend they work for a television station. Each pair of students may choose to create either a commercial to convince viewers about a health behavior or a newsflash to inform viewers about a health behavior.

26. Share examples of the Fruity Puff Commercial and the Quicker Cereal Survey Newsflash (see associated file).

27. Factual information on the class charts may be used as a reference for the newsflashes.

28. Students work in pairs to create pretend commercials or newsflashes. Students creating commercials complete the Commercial Copy handout (see associated file). Students creating a newsflash complete the Newsflash Notes handout (see associated file).

29. Guide students in making the connection that the commercials will be primarily opinions, whereas the newsflashes will contain mostly factual information.

30. Provide time for students to complete the assignment.

31. Student pairs take turns presenting the information they created standing behind the cardboard television.

32. Students at their desks listen to determine if the information presented is to inform or convince and to identify facts and opinions.

33. Upon completion, students complete the Media Mania handout. The handout is used to formatively assess student knowledge of how the media influence thoughts and feelings about health behaviors and student ability to distinguish fact and opinion in media.

34. Inform students of the upcoming Summative Assessment 2 in which they will apply what they have learned to create and follow a personal health plan.

Assessments

Students listen to pretend television broadcasts and complete the Media Mania handout. The Media Mania Key is used to formatively assess the handouts for evidence the student knows how the media influence thoughts and feelings about health behaviors and for evidence the student distinguishes fact from opinion.

Extensions

1. The Beacon Unit Plan associated with this lesson can be viewed by clicking on the link located at the top of this page or by using the following URL:
http://www.beaconlearningcenter.com/search/details.asp?item=4846.
Once you select the unit’s link, scroll to the bottom of the unit plan page to find the section, Associated Files. This section contains links to the Unit Plan Overview, Diagnostic and Summative Assessments, and other associated files (if any).

Web Links

An article providing factual information about the health benefits of eating cereal.
Cereal Eaters Get More Nutrients, More Fiber, Less Fat---Study

An article providing factual information about benefits of eating cereal.
Cereal – A Good Way to Start the Day

Attached Files

Student handouts and teacher materials.     File Extension: pdf

Return to the Beacon Lesson Plan Library.