Beacon Lesson Plan Library

Give Me Five, Cents That Is

Jennifer Slichter
Santa Rosa District Schools

Description

Give Me Five is the third lesson in the unit, Common Cents. It is an interesting lesson on nickels. Students learn money concepts through entertaining games, teacher instruction, hands-on activities, role play and partner work.

Objectives

The student creates and acts out number stories using objects.

The student knows and compares the values of a penny (1 cent), nickel (5 cents), and dime (10 cents).

The student uses concrete objects to create a pattern.

The student understands the basic concept of exchanging money for goods.

Materials

-Nickel, dime, and penny large bulletin board cutouts
-Bag of nickels
-Formative worksheet
-Cover sheet
-10 Nickels and 10 pennies and 10 dimes in a plastic bag (one per each student)
-Toy cash register
-4 Pieces of large chart paper labeled Pennies, Nickels, Dimes
-Paper nickels to distribute to students for toy store
-Happy face stamp or stickers

Preparations

1. Get bulletin board cut-outs of various coins.

2. Prepare a bag of nickels.

3. Borrow or locate a toy cash register.

4. Make copies of worksheet (one per student).

5. Make paper nickels to distribute to students which will be spent in the toy store at the unit's end.

6. Have paraprofessional or volunteer help create the plastic bags of change for each student.

Procedures

1. This is the third lesson of the unit, Common Cents.

2. Quickly review the penny and the dime. Practice making coin combinations with the class. Model correct answers. Write on chalkboard 10 Pennies, 1 Dime, 2 Nickels and tape bulletin board cutouts underneath. Review, then erase from board. Students make equivalent sets using their own coins.

3. Hold up a bag of nickels. If you are doing the complete unit, tell students that today the coin (toy) that they have a chance to earn is a nickel. Students who complete correct answers to questions, etc, will receive a toy nickel to be used at the end of the unit at the "toy store.”

4. Hold up a large bulletin board cutout of a nickel.

5. Discuss characteristics of a nickel. Give examples such as the nickel is round, silver, has a president on the front. Have students determine if the nickel is larger than a penny or smaller, larger than a dime or smaller. Tell students that the nickel is worth 5 pennies. Discuss Thomas Jefferson as President briefly. Remind students that he is on the nickel. Ask students which coin is worth more, a nickel or a dime? Ask students which coin is larger?

6. Hold up large bulletin board cutouts of nickels. Have 5 student volunteers come to the front and hold up their large coins to the class. Tell the class that when we count nickels we count by fives. Tap students’ heads as class counts the coins together.

7. Pass out plastic bags to students containing the coins. Practice counting combinations of coins. For example, model how to count 10 cents using 2 nickels and write 10 cents on the board. Illustrate several different combinations.

8. As a group, ask students to make coin combinations using their nickels. For example, show how to make 20 cents using the nickels. Show how to make 50 cents using the nickels. Show how to make 30 cents using the nickels. Walk around and assist and monitor students. Go over possible correct answers as a group. Have student volunteers model the correct answers.

9. Quickly review the penny and the dime. Practice making coin combinations with the class. Model correct answers. Write on chalkboard 10 Pennies, 1 Dime, 2 Nickels and tape bulletin board cutouts underneath. Review and erase from board. Students make equivalent sets using their own coins.

10. Students will practice making sets of coins that are worth more or less than a given amount. For example, students may take out 1 dime from the bag and 1 nickel. Ask students to point to the one that is worth more money.

11. Divide students into 4 equal groups. Students take their plastic bags of change and walk to their centers and arrange coins in their bags under the appropriate title. They must place pennies under the penny section, nickels under the nickel section and dimes under the dime section.

12. Practice making pattern combinations with the large bulletin board coins. Model possible combinations with class and have them practice making patterns with their coins. Walk around and monitor students. Provide positive and guiding feedback.

13. Give students ten minutes to arrange coins. They must count the amount of money in each set. Write the amount down under the correct column and decide which group has the most and least amount of money. Walk round and monitor students. Provide positive and guiding feedback.

14. Students go back to their seats. The group that has done the best job will receive paper nickels.

15. Give Me Five is a game that will be played next. Divide students into two groups and give directions for the game. Give Me Five is written on the board. Students are asked questions and if they say the correct answer, they get to erase a letter from the word Give Me Five. The first student to erase the last letter wins the game and receives a nickel.

16. A sample list of questions is:
-Tell me a number story involving three nickels.
-Tell me a number story involving five nickels
-Show me how many nickels are in 50 cents.
-Show me how many nickels are in 30 cents.
-Show me how to make a pattern using a nickel, dime, and penny.
-Pick a coin that is worth less than a dime.
-Pick a coin that is worth more than a penny.
-Pick a coin that is worth more than a nickel.
-How many pennies are in one nickel?

17. Review attached rubric with class so that they understand criteria of how they will be evaluated. Tell the class that they must state what they wish to buy with their nickels and will then exchange the nickels for the object. Students pretend that they are able to buy any object in the classroom and take it home. Tell students nickels must be used to buy the object. Students will take turns coming to the front and stating what they wish to buy and drawing the appropriate amount of nickels out of the bag. For example, I want to buy the pencil sharpener for 50 cents. Evaluate using a rubric.

18. Pass out formative worksheet and cover sheet.

19. Take up worksheets after students have completed. Students must complete the worksheet with 80% accuracy or be given more opportunities to practice the skills in the future.

Assessments

Students are evaluated on using a formative assessment in the form of a worksheet. Students will do the following
- Create patterns out of a penny, nickel and dime combinations.
- Sort coins in different sets and count, state value of penny, nickel, and dime
- State value of penny, nickel and dime
- Recognize which coin is worth most/least
- Draw how many pennies are in a nickel and how many pennies are in a dime.
The student will complete the assessment with 80% accuracy or be given more opportunities to practice the skills in the future.


Assessment opportunites will be available throughout procedural section.

Students are evaluated on using a rubric. Students are asked to locate something in the room they would like to buy using nickels. The student comes to the front to share with the class what he wishes to buy and draw handful of nickels out of the bag to pretend that the item costs that much. The student says I want to buy this for ----cents. He proceeds to count the nickels and give the change to the “cashier.” This is scored using the attached rubric.

Extensions

1. As an afternoon game to reinforce good behavior students may play 4 corners using taped large bulletin board letters to represent each corner (one large quarter, one large nickel, one large dime and one large penny). Student volunteer chosen to be it will come to the front and close his or her eyes and count to ten. Remaining students tiptoe to any corner. Student calls out a corner after 10 seconds is up and students in that corner must sit down. Game is repeated until there is one winner left.

2. The Beacon Unit Plan associated with this lesson can be viewed by clicking on the link located at the top of this page. (Or by using the URL http://www.beaconlearningcenter.com/search/details.asp?item=4344.) Once you select the unit’s link, scroll to the bottom of the unit plan page to find the section, Associated Files. This section contains links to the Unit Plan Overview, Diagnostic and Summative Assessments, and other associated files (if any).

Attached Files

Give Me Five Worksheet      File Extension: pdf

Rubric for Give Me Five      File Extension: pdf

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