Beacon Lesson Plan Library

Money Matters

Jennifer Slichter
Santa Rosa District Schools

Description

Money Matters is the fourth lesson in the unit, Common Cents. In this lesson, students practice adding, exchanging and comparing coins through games, hands-on activities and role-play.

Objectives

The student creates and acts out number stories using objects.

The student knows and compares the values of a penny (1 cent), nickel (5 cents), and dime (10 cents).

The student uses concrete objects to create a pattern.

The student understands the basic concept of exchanging money for goods.

Materials

-Ten large bulletin board cutout of pennies, ten large bulletin board cutouts of dimes and ten large bulletin board cutouts of nickels.
-One glass jar containing pennies, one glass jar containing nickels and one glass jar containing dimes.
-Two buckets such as sand buckets.
-Plastic bag contain thirty pennies, five nickels and two dimes per each student.
-Four bags filled with 100 pennies, four bags filled with 20 nickels and four bags filled with ten dimes.
-4 sheets of paper and a pencil.
-Worksheet and cover sheet
-Toy food and cash register
-Chalkboard /chalk or dry erase board/markers
-Paper coins for toy store.

Preparations

1. Make copies of worksheet (one per student).
2. Have parent volunteer prepare money bags or have a reliable student fill money bags.
3. Have parent volunteer prepare plastic bag containing 5 paper cutouts of nickels, dimes and quarters using construction paper. (one bag per student).
4. Write in large letters Set 1 and Set 2 on the board. This will be needed for the assessment.
5. Read and copy teacher directions for formative assessment Money Matters.

Procedures

1. Tell the class that today we are going to have the chance to apply our knowledge of what we know about the penny, nickel and dime. We are going to play a game called Money Matters.

2. Tell the class that a quick review must be done first. Quickly review the concept of the penny and its value by having ten students come up and hold ten large bulletin board cutouts of a penny. Sing one little, two little, three little pennies. Four little, five little, six little pennies. Seven little, eight little, nine little pennies. Ten little pennies make a dime. Sing to the tune of “One little, two little, three little Indians.” Point to student as number is being sung.

3. Using the pennies, play a riddle game. I am more than 7 pennies and less than 9 pennies. How many pennies am I and how much am I worth? Repeat procedure with other amounts.

4. Secondly, review the concept of the dime by having ten student volunteers come up and hold up ten bulletin board cutouts of dimes. Ask students to tell you what they count by when we count dimes. Let a student volunteer respond by tens. Count dimes together as a class. Point to student volunteer as number is being called out.

5. Using the dimes, play a riddle game. I am worth 50 cents. How many dimes am I? Repeat procedure with other amounts.

6. Hold up ten bulletin boards cutouts of nickels. Class counts together the nickels as teacher points to each student. Ask, “When we count nickels what are we counting by?” Play a riddle game. I am worth 15 cents; how many nickels am I? Repeat procedure with other amounts.

7. Make coin patterns with class using ABBA and ABA and ABC patterns using large bulletin board cutouts. Model a pattern. Have student volunteers make the patterns.

8. Have three student volunteers come to the front to hold a penny, nickel and dime. Ask class which coin is worth the most/least. Add coins together. Tell the class that when we add coins we must always count the largest coin first. Practice adding different combinations of coins together as a class. Practice adding 3 nickels and 5 pennies, one nickel and two pennies, one nickel and four pennies, two nickels and two pennies, one dime and one nickel, and one dime and two pennies. (Before each set of coins that are added as a group, remind students to ALWAYS add the largest coins first, then the next largest, followed by the smallest.) Have student volunteers hold two sets of coins. Count coins together as a group and discuss which set has the largest value and which set is smallest.

9. Give directions for the game Money Matters. Divide the class into two teams. Point to a clear jar of nickels, a clear jar of dimes and a clear jar of pennies and two buckets. Tell the students that today they are going to listen to a number story and a volunteer will solve the problem. If solved correctly the student receives the correct answer in change to put in their team's bucket. At the end of the lesson, the money is counted and the side with the most wins.

10. Pass out a plastic bag containing 6 nickels, 30 pennies, and 3 dimes. (Plastic) Give one bag to each student. Tell the students to listen to the number story and choose and take out coins from the plastic bag that solves the problem. Choose a student volunteer to come to the front to answer the question, and if the volunteer chooses the correct answer he will get that amount of coins to put in his or her team's bucket. Winner is the team with most money at the end of the game.

11. The following questions may be asked:

A. Hold up an item of food from the Home Living Center (kitchen area used as a center) and say “This item costs 10 cents. I have a nickel. How many more cents do I need to buy this toy?” Tell class to take out a coin that answers that question from the plastic bag. Walk around and monitor. If the student volunteer answers 5 cents or a nickel, the student puts the nickel or five pennies in their team's bucket. Students put other coins back in bags.

B. Hold up a penny and ask, “Who can show me a coin worth more than the penny?” Tell class to remove a coin from the plastic bag that answers the question. Walk around and monitor. If the student volunteer answers a nickel or a dime, the student puts the coin in their team's bucket. Students put coins back in bags.

C. Hold up a dime and ask, “Who can show me a coin worth less than the dime?” Tell class to take out coin from plastic bag. If the student volunteer answers a nickel or a penny, the student puts the coin in their team's bucket. Students put coins back in bags to prepare for next question.


D. Hold up a nickel and ask, “Who can show me a coin worth less than the nickel?” Tell class to take out a coin from the plastic bag that answers the question. Walk around and monitor. If the student volunteer answers a penny, the student puts the coin in their team's bucket. Students put coins back in bags to prepare for next question.

E. Hold up a nickel and ask who can show coins that would equal one nickel. Tell class to take out coins in their bag that would equal one nickel. Walk around and choose a student volunteer to answer. If student volunteer answers correctly, the student puts the five pennies in their team's bucket. Students put coins back in bags

F. Hold up a dime and ask, “Who can show me coins that would equal a dime?” Tell the class to take out coins they think would equal a dime. Walk around and monitor. Choose student to answer. When one student volunteer says 10 pennies, ask the question, ”Is there another set of coins that equal a dime?” Let another student answer two nickels. Students receiving correct answers put the money in their team's bucket. Students put coins back in their bags.

G. Take one penny and one dime out of the bag. Ask, “How many cents do you have in all?” Practice adding. Add largest valued coin first. Student volunteer comes to the front to give answer. If correct, that team receives the change to put in their bucket. Students put change back in bags.

H. Tell students, ”I need twenty cents. Who can pick two coins from their bag that equal twenty cents?” Tell class to pick two coins. Volunteer answers question. If volunteer correctly answers two dimes, the volunteer puts two dimes in their team's bucket.

I. Say to students, “I have a nickel, a dime, and three pennies. Who can show me the correct way to add the change?” Remind the class to always count largest valued coins first. If the volunteer correctly answers the question, he will get to put the nickel, dime and three pennies in his team's bucket. Count together as a class.

J. Say to students, “I have one nickel and two pennies. Who can show me the correct way to count the change?” Remind class to always count largest valued coins first. If volunteer correctly counts seven cents, he will get to put one nickel and two pennies in his team's bucket. Count together as a class.

K. Add two teams' buckets of coins. Write amount of board. Discuss which bucket contains the most and least amount of money. Group with the most money earns paper coins to spend in the toy store.

9. Students put money in bag and then remove thirty pennies. After they have sorted into a penny pile, have class count coins together. Tell the class that we are going to find out if we can exchange the pennies for other coins and still have thirty cents.

10. First, exchange pennies for nickels. Count five pennies. Put pennies in plastic bag and take out a nickel. Repeat for remaining pennies. Have class count the six nickels together as a class. Point out that we have thirty cents.

11. Next, exchange nickels for dimes. Count out two nickels. Put two nickels in plastic bag and take out a dime. Repeat for next two nickels. Repeat. Count together. Ask how many cents they have now. Ask class which is easier to carry around thirty pennies or three dimes.

12. Divide students into four equal groups. Each center has a small bag containing 100 pennies, a small bag containing 20 nickels and a small bag containing 10 dimes. The center will also have a piece of paper and a pencil. Give directions. Each group exchanges 5 pennies for 1 nickel until all the pennies are gone. They then write down how many nickels are equal to 100 pennies. Then students exchange the 20 nickels for dimes until all the nickels are gone and write down how many dimes are equal to 20 nickels. Walk around and monitor to see if students are on task. Review group results.

13. Students return to seat. Play Around the World using large bulletin board cutouts of coins. The first student stands behind his/her neighbor’s chair. Hold up a large coin and the first student who correctly says value of the coin wins the game. The winner proceeds to the next player and so on. Play until everyone has had turn. If students need more challenging questions, hold up two or more large bulletin board coins and have students race to say which coin is worth the most or least. Coins may be added together for advanced students.

13. Pass out coversheet, worksheet, and plastic bag (one per student) containing 5 large gray cutouts, 5 small gray construction paper cutouts and 5 brown construction paper cutouts.

14. Give directions for formative assessment, Money Matters. Directions are on the associated file.

15. Read to the class and have students fill in the blank with the correct answer.

16. Take up worksheet and provide feedback to the students.

Assessments

Students complete a formative assessment in the form of a worksheet that evaluates their ability to-
-Identify various coins
-Compare the value of different sets of coins
-Count sets of coins.
-Create patterns using circle cutouts that represent pennies, nickels and dimes.
The student will complete the assessment with 80% accuracy or be given more opportunities to practice the skills in the future.

Students will be assessed on using a rubric. Students will be asked to create and act out a number story using any three coins and toy food from the Home Living Center. For example, Bob chooses 3 pennies. He comes to the front and says I want to buy this doughnut (toy) for 3 cents. He must then exchange the coins for the doughnut. Julie comes to the front with a nickel, a dime, and two pennies and says I want to buy an ice cream cone for 17 cents. She must exchange her coins for the ice cream cone.
After modeling to students the correct way to do the number story. Remind them of the criteria for the rubric. They will be assessed on their ability to create a number story involving any three coins of their choice They must say what they wish to buy and what coins they are using to buy their item. They must give the cashier the correct amount of change before taking (purchasing) the item.

Extensions

The Beacon Unit Plan associated with this lesson can be viewed by clicking on the link located at the top of this page. (Or by using the URL http://www.beaconlearningcenter.com/search/details.asp?item=4344.) Once you select the unit’s link, scroll to the bottom of the unit plan page to find the section, Associated Files. This section contains links to the Unit Plan Overview, Diagnostic and Summative Assessments, and other associated files (if any).

Attached Files

Directions for Money Matters Worksheet     File Extension: pdf

Money Matters Formative Assessment Worksheet     File Extension: pdf

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