Beacon Lesson Plan Library

Getting to Know Our Elected Officials

Sandi King
Bay District Schools

Description

Who is your favorite elected official? Students choose an elected official to research, and share their information in a report. The report must be focused, contain supporting details from various sources, and use correct conventions including indentation.

Objectives

The student focuses on a central idea or topic (for example, excluding loosely related, extraneous, or repetitious information).

The student uses supporting ideas, details, and facts from a variety of sources to develop and elaborate the topic.

The student uses conventions of punctuation (including but not limited to commas in a series, dates, and addresses; beginning and ending quotation marks).

The student uses conventions of capitalization (including but not limited to proper nouns, titles, first word of a direct quotation).

The student uses correct paragraph indentation.

Materials

Day 1 –
- Student copies of Diagnostic Assessment #2, Why Vote?
- Students’ Formative Assessment Checklists

Day 2 –
- A transparency of the article, Becoming a Citizen, from the master in the associated files
- An overhead projector
- Student copies of the article, Becoming a Citizen, from the associated files
- Highlighters for student use
- One piece of chart paper titled Comma Rules
- Two colors of markers for writing on the chart
- Student copies of the worksheet Missing Punctuation, from the associated files
- A copy of Missing Punctuation Key, from the associated files
- Students’ Formative Assessment Checklists

Day 3 –
- A transparency of the article, Becoming a Citizen, previously used
- An overhead projector
- Student copies of the article, Becoming a Citizen, from the associated files
- One piece of chart paper titled Rules for Capital Letters
- Two colors of markers for writing on the chart
- Student copies of the worksheet Using Capital Letters, from the associated files
- A copy of Using Capital Letters Key, from the associated files
- Students’ Formative Assessment Checklists

Day 4 –
- A transparency of the article, Becoming a Citizen, previously used
- An overhead projector
- Student copies of the article, Becoming a Citizen, used previously
- A transparency of the Five-Paragraph Boogie, from the master in the associated files
- Student copies of the Five-Paragraph Boogie, from the associated files
- Student copies of the Five-Paragraph Boogie Test, from the associated files
- A copy of the Five-Paragraph Boogie Test Key, from the associated files
- Students’ Formative Assessment Checklists

Day 5 –
- Students’ We the People journals being used during social studies
- Clean student copies of the Five-Paragraph Boogie Test, from the associated files
- A teacher copy of the Five-Paragraph Boogie
- Resources that can be used as information sources on your local sheriff (Web pages, newspaper, school’s sheriff deputy, etc.)
- A copy of Our Sheriff model and information from the associated files
- A blank transparency
- An overhead projector
- Student copies of Let’s Find Out, from the associated files
- Student copies of the writing rubric, from the associated files
- Students’ Formative Assessment Checklists

Day 6 –
- Student copies of the writing rubric used yesterday
- Students’ We the People journals
- Student copies of Summative assessment #1, What is a Good Citizen?, from the unit’s associated files (See the Extensions section of this lesson plan for a link to the unit.)
- Students’ Formative Assessment Checklists

Day 7 –10
- Student copies of Let’s Find Out About, from the associated files
- Student copies of Summative Assessment #5, Florida Government at Work, pages 6-8, from the unit’s associated files (See the Extensions section of this lesson plan for a link to the unit.)
- Resources for students to use to find out information about various elected officials
- Students’ Formative Assessment Checklists

Preparations

Day 1 –
1. Download, print, and duplicate student copies of Diagnostic Assessment #2, Why Vote? from the unit’s associated files. See the Extensions section of this lesson plan for a link to the unit.
2. Locate students’ Formative Assessment Checklists used throughout this unit.

Day 2 –
1. Make a transparency of the article, Becoming a Citizen, from the master in the associated files.
2. Locate an overhead projector.
3. Download, print, and duplicate student copies of the article, Becoming a Citizen, from the associated files.
4. Locate highlighters for student use.
5. Locate one piece of chart paper. Write the title, Comma Rules, on the top of the chart. Attach the chart to the board or wall where it will be completed during class discussion. It will remain on display throughout the rest of the unit.
6. Locate two colors of markers for writing on the chart.
7. Download, print, and duplicate student copies of the worksheet Missing Punctuation from the associated files.
8. Download and print one copy of Missing Punctuation Key from the associated files.
9. Locate students’ Formative Assessment Checklists used throughout this unit.

Day 3 –
1. Locate the transparency of the article, Becoming a Citizen, previously used.
2. Locate an overhead projector.
3. Locate student copies of the article, Becoming a Citizen, previously used.
4. Locate one piece of chart paper. Write the title, Rules for Capital Letters, on the top of the chart. Attach the chart to the board or wall where it will be completed during class discussion. It will remain on display throughout the rest of the unit.
5. Locate two colors of markers for writing on the chart. These should be different colors from those used yesterday.
6. Download, print, and duplicate student copies of the worksheet Using Capital Letters from the associated files.
7. Download and print a copy of Using Capital Letters Key from the associated files.
8. Locate students’ Formative Assessment Checklists used throughout this unit.

Day 4 –
1. Locate the transparency of the article, Becoming a Citizen, used previously.
2. Locate an overhead projector.
3. Locate student copies of the article, Becoming a Citizen, used previously.
4. Make a transparency of the Five-Paragraph Boogie, from the master in the associated files.
5. Download, print, and duplicate student copies of the Five-Paragraph Boogie from the associated files.
6. Download, print, and duplicate student copies of the Five-Paragraph Boogie Test from the associated files.
7. Download and print a copy of the Five-Paragraph Boogie Test Key from the associated files.
8. Locate students’ Formative Assessment Checklists used throughout this unit.

Day 5 –
1. Locate students’ We the People journals being used during social studies.
2. Download, print, and duplicate a clean copy of the Five-Paragraph Boogie Test for each student.
3. Locate a teacher copy of the Five-Paragraph Boogie.
4. Locate and display resources that can be used as information sources on your local sheriff (Web pages, newspaper, school’s sheriff deputy, etc.).
5. Download and print a copy of Our Sheriff model and information from the associated files.
6. Locate a blank transparency and pen for writing on the transparency.
7. Locate an overhead projector.
8. Download, print, and duplicate student copies of Let’s Find Out from the associated files.
9. Download, print, and duplicate student copies of the writing rubric from the associated files.
10. Locate students’ Formative Assessment Checklists used throughout this unit.

Day 6 –
1. Locate student copies of the writing rubric used yesterday.
2. Locate students’ We the People journals.
3. Download, print, and duplicate student copies of Summative Assessment #1, What is a Good Citizen?, from the unit’s associated files. See the Extensions section of this lesson plan for a link to the unit.
4. Locate students’ Formative Assessment Checklists used throughout this unit.

Day 7 – 11
1. Download, print, and duplicate student copies of Let’s Find Out About from the associated files.
2. Download, print, and duplicate student copies of Summative Assessment #5, Florida Government at Work, pages 6-8, from the unit’s associated files. See the Extensions section of this lesson plan for a link to the unit.
3. Locate and display resources for students to use to find out information about various elected officials.
4. Students’ We the People journals should be used for further evidence of mastery and should be available for formative assessment each day.
5. Locate students’ Formative Assessment Checklists used throughout this unit.

Procedures

This is the third of nine lesson plans for the unit, We the People. This plan addresses the writing standards targeted in the unit. It is a ten-day lesson plan and is to be completed during the part of the teaching day scheduled for writing instruction. Writing instruction must precede social studies instruction each day as writing skills learned will be practiced in social studies content. Social studies, math and reading standards are integrated with this unit and are addressed in several other lesson plans. See the Unit Plan Overview from the unit’s associated files for guidance in how to organize the teaching of the lesson plans.

Session 1 – (Day 1 of the unit)
Diagnostic Assessment

1. Begin by administering Diagnostic assessment #2, Why Vote? All instructions for administering the assessment as well as all tools needed are available from the unit’s associated files. Use the results of the diagnostic to modify the activities presented in this lesson plan to meet the needs of students. The diagnostic assessment will be reviewed and used as a study guide later in the lesson, so retain all copies of the assessment.

Session 2 – (Day 2 of the unit)
Focus and punctuation

1. To gain students’ attention display the overhead transparency of the article, Becoming a Citizen. Cover the article except the first paragraph.

2. Ask students to read the first paragraph. Then ask students what they think the article is about. Guide them to express that the article is about becoming an American citizen. Now that the main idea has been established, discuss the word focus as it pertains to writing. For the writing to be focused, all sentences in the writing must relate to and support the main idea. Remind students that focus is one of the areas that will be used to judge their writing for FCAT. Tell students that as we read they rest of the article, we will be looking for and discussing examples of focus.

3. Pass out student copies of the article. Tell students to read with you as you read the article. Ask them to be looking for how each sentence relates to and supports the ideas of becoming an American citizen.

4. Reread the first paragraph to the students. Ask if the students notice any sentence that should not be part of the article because it does not relate to or support the main idea.

5. Establish that all sentences in the first paragraph are focused on the main idea. The first sentence is focused because it establishes an oriental name and leads to a question of citizenship. Being born in Orlando establishes how Long became a citizen. The third and fourth sentences set the stage and tell the main idea. The final sentence is a transition to the next paragraph.

6. Remind students that they are to continue looking for focus in the article. Read the second paragraph. Elicit student response to the focus of the sentences in this paragraph. Establish that the third sentence concerning their parent’s jobs is not relevant to becoming an American citizen. That sentence is not focused on the main idea. Ask students to use their pencils to draw a line through that sentence on their copy of the article. Demonstrate this procedure by marking out the sentence on the transparency.

7. Repeat the procedure with the third paragraph. Note that all sentences in this paragraph are focused on the main idea.

8. Continue the procedure with the remaining paragraphs. Note that the sentence in fourth paragraph telling that the grandparents did not attend is not focused. It has nothing to do with becoming an American citizen. Have students mark out the sentence that is not focused on the main idea.

9. As students discuss various sentences and whether they are focused, give oral affirmative feedback explaining why responses are correct or corrective feedback guiding students towards correct responses. An example of affirmative feedback might be, “Right, telling that his mom was born in Saigon, Vietnam let’s us know that she was not born an American citizen.” An example of corrective feedback might be, “ Think about that sentence again. The fact that his mom was born in Vietnam tells us that she was not born an American citizen. Is that an idea important to the focus of the paragraph?”

10. Mark the Formative Assessment Checklist indicating students’ understanding of focus in writing.

11. This review of focus will be further expanded in the procedures for the following days’ lessons.

12. Comma and quotation mark usage has been taught in previous grades, so tell students that we will be reviewing the use of punctuation marks, especially use of commas and quotation marks, and then will use them in writing.

13. Remind students that quotation marks are always used in pairs. The beginning quotation mark is written at the beginning of what is said, and the ending quotation mark is written at the end of what is said. Students are to look at the article and use their pencils to circle all of the quotation marks.

14. Allow time for students to complete the circling.

15. Call on individuals to come to the overhead and circle the quotation marks on the transparency of the article. As each quotation mark is identified, ask whether it is a beginning or ending quotation mark. Ask the student to read the quote. Be sure the students only read the words between the quotation marks and do not include the speaker. For example, for the sentence “’Congratulation!’ exclaimed Judge Hunt,” only the word, congratulation, should be read.

16. As students circle and explain the quotations on the overhead, students should be correcting their copies of the article if needed.

17. Ask students to recite rules for using commas. Rules that you are eliciting are
· Between a city and state
· In a date
· Between items in a series
· In addresses
· Before or after a quote
· In a compound sentence
· After an opening phrase of a sentence

18. As each rule is discussed, write the rule on a chart titled Comma Rules, which will be displayed in the room. The rules should be numbered and written in alternating colors for easy reference and ease of reading.

19. As you are writing the rule on the chart, students look through the article and find examples of each rule. Instruct students to highlight the comma that is an example of the individual rule.

20. Ask a student to come to the overhead and highlight the comma that is an example of the stated rule. While the student is highlighting, give affirmative feedback explaining why the student’s response is correct or give corrective feedback guiding the student towards the correct response.

21. Mark the Formative Assessment Checklist as to the students’ ability to identify comma usage.

22. To know which highlighted comma matches which rule, have the students use their pencils to write the number corresponding to the rule beside each highlighted comma.

23. Continue this procedure for each comma rule as it is revealed by the students and written on the chart.

24. Students place their copies of Becoming a Citizen in their work folder or notebook where they will be easily located for future use.

25. Pass out student copies of the worksheet, Missing Punctuation. Read the directions to the students and answer any questions. Be sure to tell students that the worksheet is not only missing commas and quotation marks, but also periods and question marks.

26. Allow time for students to complete the worksheet independently.

27. Collect the completed worksheets and use them to formatively assess the students’ ability to use quotation marks and commas correctly.

28. Mark the Formative Assessment Checklist.

29. During social studies, students were asked to write in their journals. Remind students that as they were writing in their social studies journals, they should have each sentence focused on the main ideas, and correct usage of punctuation, especially commas and quotation marks. (See the lesson plan Citizenship, procedures #25 for instructions for journal writing.) Allow students to revisit the journal entry to check for focus and correct punctuation.


Session 3 - (Day 3 of the unit)
Focus and Capitalization

1. To review and gain students’ attention, display the transparency, Becoming a Citizen, used in yesterday’s lesson. Review the rules of focus by having a student explain why some sentences are marked out. Review that focus means that all the sentences relate to and support the main idea. Mark the Formative Assessment Checklist as students demonstrate their knowledge of focus in writing.

2. Student copies of Becoming a Citizen should be placed on students’ desks.

3. Use of capital letters has been taught in previous grades, so tell students that we will be reviewing the use of capital letters and then will use them correctly in writing.

4. Ask students to recite rules for using capital letters. Rules that you are eliciting are
· The first letter in a sentence
· The first letter of any proper noun (names of people and places)
· The first letter of a person’s title (Dr., Mr., Senator, etc.)
· The first letter of each important word in a title (books, songs, poems, etc.)
· The first letter of the first word of a direct quote

5. As each rule is discussed, write the rule on a chart titled Rules for Capital Letters, which will be displayed in the room. The rules should be numbered and written in alternating colors for easy reference and ease of reading.

6. As you are writing the rule on the chart, students look through the article and find examples of each rule. Instruct students to draw a box around the capital letter that is an example of the individual rule.

7. Ask a student to come to the overhead and draw a box around the capital letter that is an example of the stated rule. While the student is drawing, give affirmative feedback explaining why the student’s response is correct or give corrective feedback guiding the student towards the correct response.

8. Mark the Formative Assessment Checklist as to the students’ ability to identify correct usage of capital letters.

9. To know which capital letter matches which rule, have the students use their pencils to write the number corresponding to the rule beside each box containing a capital letter.

10. Continue this procedure for each capital letter rule as it is revealed by the students and written on the chart.

11. Students place their copies of Becoming a Citizen in their work folder or notebook where they will be easily located for future use.

12. Pass out student copies of the worksheet, Using Capital Letters. Read the directions to the students and answer any questions.

13. Allow time for students to complete the worksheet independently.

14. Collect the completed worksheets and use them to formatively assess the students’ ability to use capital letters correctly.

15. Mark the Formative Assessment Checklist.

16. During social studies, students will be asked to write in their journals. Remind students that as they are writing in their social studies journals, you will be looking for each sentence to be focused on the main ideas, correct usage of punctuation, and correct usage of capital letters. (See the lesson plan Branches of Government, Session 1 (Day 3 of the unit) procedures #23 for instructions for journal writing.) Use the social studies journal entry to formatively assess whether students’ writing is focused and whether proper capitalization and punctuation are used. Mark the Formative Assessment Checklist.

Session 4 (Day 4 of the unit)
Focus, support, and indention

1. Display the Becoming a Citizen article transparency. Question students as to the reasons for the different markings on the transparency. Invite students to explain the marks and state the reason or rules. This serves as a review of focus, punctuation, and capital letter use. Before calling on students, consult your Formative Assessment Checklist to determine students who may need more opportunities to demonstrate mastery of these standards. Formative feedback should be given to affirm correct responses or to guide students toward correct answers. Mark the Formative Assessment Checklist as appropriate.

2. Tell students that today’s lesson will help them remember how to create a five-paragraph writing.

3. Use a copy of Five Paragraph Boogie from the associated files as your guide while teaching students the strategy.

4. Have students stand beside their desks. Explain that you will be teaching them a chant and dance that will help them remember the five paragraphs that are part of a focused writing. Tell students that first you will read the reason for the words and movement, then demonstrate the words and movement, and then have students say the words and do the movement with you.

5. As each part of the Five-Paragraph Boogie is explained and added, practice the chant and dance from the beginning. This repetition allows students to remember the sequence and how the parts fit together. You will add a new part, repeat from the beginning, add a new part, and repeat from the beginning, until the students have practiced the entire chant and dance a couple of times.

6. Ask students to locate their copies of the article, Becoming a Citizen.

7. Pass out student copies of Five-Paragraph Boogie and the Five-Paragraph Boogie Test. Tell students that they will be testing the article to see if it passes the Five-Paragraph Boogie test.

8. Use the Five-Paragraph Boogie Test Key to guide students toward understanding the parts of the writing and how they fit together.

9. Ask students how many paragraphs are in the article, Becoming a Citizen. Elicit the response that there are five paragraphs.

10. Ask how students can tell when a new paragraph begins. Draw students to the understanding that all paragraphs begin with an indention. Tell students that normally, paragraph indentation is about five letter spaces.

11. Call on various students to read the first three words from a paragraph. This helps students identify and locate a paragraph, especially if paragraph and indent are unfamiliar terms.

12. Ask a student to read the introduction paragraph. Then, engage the students in a discussion of the parts of the introduction as described in the Five-Paragraph Boogie. As the discussion progresses, students make appropriate entries on their Five-Paragraph Boogie Test sheet. See the Five-Paragraph Boogie Key for appropriate responses.

13. Use this opportunity to teach about how supporting paragraphs are used to better explain the topic of the article. Details are given to help the reader understand the support. Use the Five-Paragraph Boogie Test as your model as you explain that the key number for support and details is always three. There should be at least three supporting ideas for the article topic. Each supporting idea should have at least three details. This concept is observable from the framework of the worksheet.

14. Ask a student to read the first supporting paragraph. Discuss the main idea of the paragraph and come to a class consensus as to what to write on the Five-Paragraph Boogie Test worksheet. Continue the discussion by identifying details that support the main ideas of the paragraph. Students write the details on their Five-Paragraph Boogie worksheets.

15. After using the introduction paragraph and first supporting paragraph to model finding the information from the article to enter on the Five-Paragraph Boogie Test worksheet, and having used the first supporting paragraph to teach about the use of support and details that focus on the topic, allow students to complete the Five-Paragraph Boogie Test on their own.

16. Collect the completed Five-Paragraph Boogie Test worksheets. Use these completed documents to formatively assess students’ ability to identify support and details that develop a topic.

17. During social studies, students will be writing in their journals. At that time, remind students to use their Five-Paragraph Boogie to write their journal entry. Use the journal entry to formatively assess paragraph indention, focus, and use of support and details. (See the lesson plan, Branches of Government, Session 2, day 4 of the unit, procedure # 24.)

18. After assessing students’ journals, mark the Formative Assessment Checklist for focus, use of support, use of punctuation, use of capitalization, and indentation.

Session 5 (Day 5 of the unit)
Review and use of sources to gain details

1. As a review and to gain students’ attention, begin the lesson by inviting students to join you in doing the Five-Paragraph Boogie. Review the parts of a five-paragraph article by asking guiding questions and having students reveal the reasons for each part of the chant and dance.

2. Ask students to locate the journal entry they wrote yesterday in their We the People journal.

3. Review the capitalization and punctuation charts developed earlier by calling on students to read a rule from the chart and then asking students to read the articles they wrote yesterday of why the Florida Constitution is important to the people of Florida to locate an example of each rule.

4. Before calling on an individual to read the sentence that demonstrates the rule, refer to the Formative Assessment Checklist to locate students that may still need documentation of mastery.

5. As students read example sentences from their writings, give formative feedback to affirm correct responses or to guide students toward correct responses. Mark the Formative Assessment Checklist as appropriate.

6. To review use of paragraph indentation, ask students to show their articles to a neighbor. The neighbor is to touch each indentation while counting the paragraphs. Each article is a five-paragraph writing, so everyone should be able to locate five indentions.

7. During this process, circulate and check students’ writing for appropriate indentation. Give formative feedback and mark the Formative Assessment Checklist as appropriate.

8. Distribute copies of the Five-Paragraph Boogie Test worksheet to students. Tell students that they will be using the worksheet as a self-assessment of their journal writing. Students are to check for focus and use of supporting ideas and details by completing their Five-Paragraph Boogie Test worksheet.

9. As students complete their Five-Paragraph Boogie Test worksheets, circulate and formatively assess students’ ability to write a focused article that contains support and details. Give formative feedback and mark the Formative Assessment Checklist.

10. Part of the Grade Level Expectation says that the students must use support, details, and facts from a variety of sources. Today’s lesson will stress using a variety of sources and giving credit to those sources in our writing.

11. Display various sources that can be used to find information about the local sheriff. Sources may include Websites, local newspapers, a visit from the sheriff or one of his deputies, etc. Suggested Websites are listed on the Our Sheriff document from the associated files.

12. Divide the class into groups. The number of resources will determine the number of groups. Each group needs a chairman, recorder, and presenter as well as several information gatherers.

13. Distribute the information-organizing tool, Let’s Find Out, from the associated files to each group.

14. Students use the resources provided by the teacher to locate as much information as possible about their sheriff. The group recorder writes the information on the Let’s Find Out sheet.

15. Allow about 15 minutes for students to find and record information from the available resources.

16. Students return to their desks. The groups’ presenters maintain possession of the groups’ Let’s Find Out sheets.

17. Using a transparency and the overhead, model how to include sources in your writing. Begin a writing titled Our Sheriff. Refer to your copy of the Five-Paragraph Boogie Test and think aloud as to what should be included in the introductory paragraph. Write the introductory paragraph on the transparency. You may create your own introductory paragraph, take suggestions from students, or use the sample of Our Sheriff from the associated files. The purpose of the introductory paragraph is to introduce the topic, so no sources are cited in this paragraph.

18. Tell students that with each of the supporting paragraphs, you will be asking group presenters for details and the source used to find the details.

19. Think aloud to remind yourself to indent the paragraph. Begin the first support paragraph by telling students that you will be supporting the topic of our sheriff by adding personal information about the sheriff. Compose a topic sentence and write it on the transparency. Ask presenters to share what their groups found out about the sheriff’s personal information. As information is shared, write supporting facts and details being sure to cite the sources. Remind students, by thinking aloud, that at least three facts and/or details must be included.

20. Continue this procedure of modeling how to write supporting paragraphs with facts and details from various sources for the remaining two support paragraphs.

21. Use the Five-Paragraph Boogie Test as a reminder of what needs to be included in the conclusion paragraph. Model writing the conclusion. Think aloud to remind students not to add any new information, but rather to do a fast review, answer the question, and close.

22. Tell students that they will be writing in their social studies journals later today. When they do, they will be expected to use all of the writing skills that they have been reviewing and practicing.

23. In order for students to better understand just what will be expected of them, pass out the writing rubric from the associated files. Read and discuss each section of the rubric. Answer any questions.

24. Students place the rubric in their We the People journals for easy access when they begin their journal entries during social studies.

25. Formative assessment of these writing standards will take place after students write in their social studies journals. (See the lesson plan, Branches of Government, Session 3, Day 5 of the unit, procedure #20 for more information.)

Session 6 (Day 6 of the unit)
Review and Summative Assessment 1

1. As a review of the five writing standards, and as preparation for summative assessment #1, students use their writing rubrics to self-assess yesterday’s entry in their We the People journals.

2. Read the first expectation of the rubric. Ask students to check their journal entries and mark the box to indicate the degree that their writing shows mastery of the expectation.

3. Continue reading the expectation, allowing students time to check their journal entries for the degree of mastery of that expectation, and having students assign themselves the appropriate number of points.

4. As you proceed with this procedure, circulate to make sure students understand what they should be doing and to conference with any students having difficulty. Be sure to ask students to justify why they assigned themselves the various points.

5. Now that students have used the rubric to review the standards and to self-assess their writings, they are ready for the first writing summative assessment.

6. Distribute Summative Assessment #1, What is a Good Citizen? and allow students about 30 minutes to complete the assessment. Collect the completed assessments. Use the rubric and scoring guide to assign a grade to the assessments. Keep the assessments to use as a review before the final summative assessment.

Session 7-11 (Days 7-11 of the unit)
Write on chosen official (Summative Assessment #5)

1. Part of Summative Assessment #5, Florida Government at Work, is a student writing about an elected official.

2. List all of the elected officials for your area on the board. Students select one of these elected officials to research and write a report about. Students should notify you in writing as to their selection. It does not matter if several students select the same official, but students must work on the report individually in order to assess individual students’ abilities.

3. Pass out Summative Assessment #5, Florida Government at Work, pages six through eight.

4. Discuss the social studies requirements to the writing from page six and the social studies rubric from page seven. Answer any questions.

5. Discuss the writing rubric from page eight. Be sure students understand that this is the same rubric that they have been using for their journal writings. Answer any questions.

6. Pass out student copies of the Let’s Find Out About for use as a prewrite tool while gathering information. This tool is available from the associated files.

7. Make resources available to students. These resources may be Websites used during social studies, an email sent to an individual official, or any other current resource available. Depending on the availability of computers with Internet access, you may need to print information from various Websites for students to read and gain information from. Students should be encouraged to use their computers at home to find information on their selected official. Check for email addresses for elected officials on various Websites such as the Supervisor of Elections site, the Board of Commissions site, and the Florida House or Senate sites.

8. Allow writing time for the next several days to complete this assignment. As students work, circulate and assist as needed.

9. Each day, remind students to use the Five-Paragraph Boogie, project instructions and both the social studies and writing rubrics to guide their writing. Encourage self-assessment often!

10. Students turn in their completed assignments as they finish. If need be, formatively assess their first attempt giving formative feedback written on their document and allow them to rewrite before being summatively assessed. Use the scoring guide for Summative Assessment #5, Florida Government at Work to assign grades for writing and social studies.

11. Students write in their social studies journals at the conclusion of each day’s social studies lesson. These journal entries should be used as added formative assessments for the five writing standards taught and assessed in this lesson and unit. This integration of writing and social studies allows for students to use their writing skills in the content area. Mark the Formative Assessment Checklist as appropriate.

Assessments

Diagnostic Assessment
Before the first teaching session, Diagnostic Assessment # 2, Why Vote, is to be administered. This assessment is available from the unit’s associated files. All instructions and tools are contained in the file. See the Extensions section of this lesson plan for information on the unit.

Formative Assessment
Using various student generated responses and worksheets provided in the associated files, students demonstrate their ability to write a report that is focused, contains supporting details, and follows the conventions of punctuation, capitalization, and paragraph indentation. A Formative Assessment Checklist for recording individual students’ daily progress is available from the unit’s associated files. See the Extensions section of this lesson plan for information on the unit. Criteria for the formative assessments will be shared in the procedures section of this lesson plan as the lesson progresses.

The student focuses on a central idea or topic.
· Does the student present a central idea or topic?
· Do all sentences of the writing relate to the central idea or topic?

The student uses supporting ideas, details, and facts from a variety of sources to develop and elaborate the topic.
· Does the writing include ideas to support the focus?
· Does the writing include details and facts to support the ideas?
· Does the student use more than one source to gather details and facts?

The student uses conventions of punctuation (including but not limited to commas in a series, dates, addresses, and beginning and ending quotation marks).
· Does the student correctly use commas in a series?
· Are dates are included and correctly written?
· Are addresses included and correctly written?
· Are quotes included and correctly written?
· Are ending punctuation marks correctly used?

The student uses conventions of capitalization (including but not limited to proper nouns, titles, first words of a direct quotation).
· Does the student begin each sentence with a capital letter?
· Does the student begin each proper noun with a capital letter?
· Does the student correctly use capital letters in titles?
· Does the student use a capital letter for the first word of a direct quote?

The student uses correct paragraph indentation.
· Does the student indent all paragraphs?

Summative Assessment
Students are administered two summative assessments for the targeted standards. On day nine, Summative Assessment #1, What is a Good Citizen? is administered. On day eleven of the unit, Summative Assessment #5, Florida Government at Work is administered. All instructions and tools for administering, evaluating, and scoring these summative assessments are available from the unit’s associated files. See the Extensions section of this lesson plan for more information.

Extensions

1. The Beacon Unit Plan associated with this lesson can be viewed by clicking on the link located at the top of this page or by using the following URL: http://www.beaconlearningcenter.com/search/details.asp?item=5197. Once you select the unit’s link, scroll to the bottom of the unit plan page to find the section, Associated Files. This section contains links to the Unit Plan Overview, Diagnostic and Summative Assessments, and other associated files.
2. Language textbooks can be used as a resource for further practice with capitalization and punctuation.
3. The final project can take forms other than a written article. Although projects will still be assessed using the social studies and writing rubrics, it may take the form of a poster, PowerPoint presentation, etc.
4. Pairs of students may work together to gather information about an official, but the writing must be done individually.
5. Elected officials may be invited to come visit the class and be interviewed by students as they complete their Let’s Find Out About prewrite forms.

Web Links

1. This site tells the assessment is to be administered and explains each component that will be scored. Focus, support, and conventions are explained in detail as they pertain to this assessment. Since these components are also the focus of this lesson plan, alignment to the description given on this site is important.
Florida Writing Assessment Program (FLORIDA WRITES!) description of Florida Writes

2. An explanation of the various points assigned to writings is available through this rubric. This site can serve as a teacher and/or student resource.
Florida Writing Assessment Program (FLORIDA WRITES!) Score Points in Rubric

3. A description that aligns with various scores is given. This site can serve as a teacher and /or student resource.
Florida Writing Assessment Program (FLORIDA WRITES!) Description of Writing Scores

Attached Files

1. Becoming a Citizen article     File Extension: pdf

2. Missing Punctuation worksheet     File Extension: pdf

3. Missing Punctuation Key      File Extension: pdf

4. Using Capital Letters worksheet     File Extension: pdf

5. Using Capital Letters Key     File Extension: pdf

6. Five-Paragraph Boogie instructions     File Extension: pdf

7. Five-Paragraph Boogie Test     File Extension: pdf

8. Five-Paragraph Boogie Test Key     File Extension: pdf

9. Our Sheriff introductory paragraph and information that can be used when modeling writing     File Extension: pdf

10. Let’s Find Out worksheet     File Extension: pdf

11. Let’s Find Out About worksheet     File Extension: pdf

12. Writing Rubric used for the assessment     File Extension: pdf

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