Beacon Lesson Plan Library

My Life in Numbers

Sandra Pickard
Santa Rosa District Schools

Description

Students create a number line depicting their lives and family history. Students use absolute value to represent pre and post birth events.

Objectives

The student locates, gathers, analyzes, and evaluates written information for a variety of purposes, including research projects, real-world tasks, and self-improvement.

Understands concrete and symbolic representations of real and complex numbers in real-world situations.

Materials

- Teacher created number line of her/his life
- Unlined paper white and/or color continuous form computer paper/banner paper poster board or other appropriate medium
- Markers
- Paints
- Color Pencils
- Glue
- Pictures (magazines, personal, original artwork, etc.)
- Pencil
- Lined notebook paper
- Family history (If this is not possible I allow students to use historical events from before they were born)
- Overhead projector/chalkboard
- Overhead markers/chalk
- Computer (optional)
- Computer graphics (optional)

Preparations

1. Teach/review the students on ordering integers from least to greatest and visa-versa.

2. Teach/review students on determining the absolute value of an integer.

3. Create a number line of your life.

Procedures

Pre-requisites: Before beginning this lesson students should be able to order integers from least to greatest and identify the absolute value of an integer.

1. Show students a pre-made number line of your life. (Make this as creative and colorful as you can).

2. Have the students talk about anything unusual they see. (Point out or draw them into a discussion of equal absolute value).

3. On the overhead/chalkboard draw a number line and illustrate equal absolute value for two integers (one positive and one negative).

4. Using the number line of your life talk about events that happened before and after you were born. Point out that you have used the date of your birth as the point of origin or zero. You determine the integer by subtracting the birth year from the event year.

5. Ask students about events that have happened in their lives. How old were you when a particular event happened? How many years before you were born did this event happen? In what year did this event happen? What integer can be used to represent this number? (You determine the integer by subtracting the birth year from the event year.). What is the absolute value of this number?

6. Ask students about events that happened in their families(marriages, the birth of siblings, etc). How many years before you were born did this event happen? In what year did this event happen? What integer can be used to represent this number? (You determine the integer by subtracting birth year from the event year.) What is the absolute value of this number?

7. Ask students if they know of any events that would have the same absolute value one event before they were born and one event after they were born? Use your number line to model possible events and to illustrate that the events have the same absolute value.

8. Students will use lined notebook paper to create two columns. One for pre-birth events and one for post-birth events. At the top of the paper students will write their birth date. Students will then brainstorm 10 or more events per column.

9. If necessary students will for homework interview family members to obtain the required information.

10. After the students have the required number of events, the year the event happened, the number of years before or after their birth the event happened, the integer that represents the number and the absolute value of the number they can begin creating a number line. Observe student-brainstorming sheet. Observe that students are subtracting correctly.

11. The number line will have 10 integer pairs one integer on each side of zero (students date of birth). Each pair of integers will have equal absolute value. The integers are to be below the number line and the year of occurrence is to be above the number line. The event is to be above the year of occurrence. Students are encouraged to be as creative as possible.

12. After completing the number line the students will present their lines to the class. The students will also write a paragraph about what they discovered about their heritage/culture.

Assessments

Observe student-brainstorming sheet.
Observe that students are subtracting correctly.

The number line is the assessment.

1. 1 point for each integer = 21 pt. Max.
2. 1 point for each year of occurrence = 21 pt. Max.
3. 1 points for each equal absolute value pair = 10 pt. Max.
4. 1 point for each event label = 21 pt. Max.
5. 1 point for each integer that is in sequence from zero = 20 pt. Max.
6. 7 points for neatness (straight line, everything in the correct place) = 7 pt. Max.
7. 10 points students present their number lines to the class and talk about the events shown. All number lines should be displayed for at least one week.
8. 10 points write a paragraph about what you discovered about your heritage/culture.

Extensions

Before beginning this lesson students should be able to order integers from least to greatest and identify the absolute value of an integer.

ESOL students could use pictorial representations of events.

Genealogical research.
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