Beacon Lesson Plan Library

Human Sentences

Leslie Dobbs

Description

This lesson allows students a hands-on opportunity to learn grammar. The students will work in groups to create human sentences to demonstrate for the class how to correctly use commas when punctuating dates in sentences.

Objectives

The student uses conventions of punctuation (including but not limited to commas, colons, semicolon, quotation marks, apostrophes).

The student knows patterns and rules found in the English language (for example, grammar usage, word pronunciation).

Materials

--Cut up colored paper cards (enough for each group to have 20 cards cut into quarters)
--Markers (at least two or three for every group)
--Board and markers/chalk

Preparations

1. Cut colored paper or cardstock into quarters. Make sure you have plenty so that each group can have approximately 20 cards to work with.
2. Make 4-6 cards with commas on each one.
3. Assign groups and group numbers.
4. Write on the board examples and non-examples of using commas with dates in sentences.
5. Write on the board the instructions for the sentence writing.
6. Gather materials listed above.

Procedures

1. Review punctuating dates in sentences with commas. Review some examples and non-examples using commas with dates.

2. Divide students into groups of three or four. Assign each group a group number and be sure to record who is in each group.

3. Instruct groups to write three (3) sentences using dates in each sentence as follows: A) include one date at the end of the sentence,
B) include one date at the beginning or the end of the sentence, and
C) include two dates anywhere in the sentence.
Instruct the students to include the month, day, and year in each date. Remind the students to write each group memberís name on the paper as well as the group number and class period.

4. Tell the groups that they are to create human sentences from the sentences they have just written. Instruct the students to write one word or two (if the sentence is long) on each card. Pass out cards and markers to each group as needed. Tell the students not to add the commas in their sentences. Ask the students to write the group number and class period on the back of every card.

5. After the students have made the human sentences, ask for volunteer groups to present one of their human sentences. Make sure the groups you choose present an example of each one of the three types of sentences required.

6. Have the comma cards handy. As the groups present the human sentences, ask the class for suggestions of where to place the comma cards you have.

7. After the presentations, collect the group papers and human sentence cards.

8. Review what was learned of the correct use of commas with dates.

Assessments

Assessment of groupís human sentences will be based on the following rubric:

Full Accomplishment (3): Group writes one each of the three required types of sentences (one date at end of the sentence, one date at the beginning of the sentence, and two dates anywhere in the sentence). Each sentence is correctly punctuated with commas.

Substantial Accomplishment (2): Group writes one each of the three required types of sentences (one date at end of the sentence, one date at the beginning of the sentence, and two dates anywhere in the sentence). At least one sentence contains errors in comma usage.

Partial Accomplishment (1): Group fails to write one each of the three required types of sentences (one date at end of the sentence, one date at the beginning of the sentence, and two dates anywhere in the sentence). More than one of the sentences contain errors in comma usage.

Extensions

This type of lesson allows students a hands-on opportunity for learning how to use commas correctly. This lesson can easily be modified to teach almost any grammar rule.
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