Beacon Lesson Plan Library

Was Goldilocks Innocent or Guilty?

Patti Cogburn
Santa Rosa District Schools

Description

After reading any play, short story, or novel that revolves around a trial, for example, [Witness for the Prosecution], the student will act out a role in a mock fairy tale trial. This is the second lesson in a series.

Objectives

The student uses volume, stress, pacing, enunciation, eye contact, and gestures that meet the needs of the audience and topic.

Analyzes the effectiveness of complex elements of plot such as setting, major events, problems, conflicts and resolutions

The student uses classical, contemporary, and vocal acting techniques and methods to portray the physical, emotional, and social dimensions of characters from various genres and media.

Materials

-Previous lesson - see Weblinks
-At least one copy of the assigned fairy tale for each group. The fairy tales may be so familiar to the students that no copy of it will be needed. Fairy tales such as [The Three Little Pigs, Goldilocks and the Three Bears, Hansel and Gretel], and [Little Red Riding Hood] work well.
- Paper
-Writing utensil
-Gavel for the judge, or something to represent a gavel
-Any props or costumes the students want to bring in to make their roles more realistic.

Preparations

BACKGROUND:
Since this lesson follows -Was The Wolf Really Guilty?-, the essays assessed in that lesson need to given back to the students as quickly as possible. This lesson works best if it closely follows -Was the Wolf Really Guilty-, although some time could lapse between assignments if necessary. The better they have done on their essays, the easier this assignment will be for them.

Also, since this lesson follows -Was The Wolf Really Guilty?-, the students have already been assigned their roles in the mock trial. They are to now -act out- the role they defended in their essays.

Procedures

BACKGROUND:
Since this lesson follows -Was The Wolf Really Guilty?-, the students have already been assigned their roles in the mock trial. They are to now -act out- the role they defended in their essays.

TEACHERS:
1. The essays from the lesson -Was the Wolf Really Guilty?- need to be passed back to each student.

2. Make copies of the evaluation checklist for each student.

3. Hand out the checklists to the students.

4. Discuss and explain the checklist with the class prior to the group work.

5. Collect the checklist and use it in the evaluation.

STUDENTS:
First Day
1. Students work in their assigned fairy tale groups and discuss the manner in which they will present their trial.

2. Students share the main points of their defense in their essays with their group.

3. The groups then decide on the main conflicts within the story they want to cover in their trials. These major events are to come out in the dialogue of the trial.

4. The students in the group need to write out an outline of the order of events in their trial.

5. The students script out their parts within the trial focusing on the importance of their roles in the trial and how their roles fit in with the major events and conflicts within the story.

6. The students decide on any props or costumes they may need to bring the following class period for their presentation.

7. The students rehearse their trials within their groups. (The rehearsal may be done on the second day prior to the presentations if time runs out on the first day.)

Second Day
1. Each group presents the mock fairy tale trial to the class.

2. The class can act as the jury and cast their vote of innocent or guilty at the end of the trial by turning in a secret ballot, or just raising their hands for innocent or guilty.

3. The judge then needs to take the vote and sentence or acquit the defendant.

Assessments

Students are assessed individually on how clearly they present their characters during their trial. ( see attached checklist in the Associated File)

Web Links

Web supplement for Was Goldilocks Innocent or Guilty?
Was the Wolf Really Guilty?

Attached Files

Evaluation checklist.     File Extension: pdf

Return to the Beacon Lesson Plan Library.