Beacon Lesson Plan Library

What's So Nice About Fairy Tales?

Michelle Gowan
Liberty County Schools

Description

Students read fairy tales and then write a modernized version of the story. Students then compare their version to the original version and analyze whether or not the author's purpose is compromised.

Objectives

The student understands ways the author's perspective or point of view affects a text.

The student uses supporting ideas, details, and facts from a variety of sources to develop and elaborate topic.

The student compares and contrasts settings from various texts.

The student knows the primary conflicts and explains their resolutions in a variety of text types.

Materials

- Writing materials
- Overhead projector, transparency film, and marking pens
- Books and materials containing fairy tales from books. Enough for every two students
- 6 Traits of Writing rubric for Content
- Copy of 'Hansel and Gretel' version found at the following web site: http://members.aol.com/rocketrder/frytales/hansel/hansel.htm
- Modernized version of 'Snow White' provided in file attachments

Preparations

1. The teacher should view and become familiar with the 6 Traits of Writing web sites noted in the web links portion of this lesson and download a copy of the rubric for Content. The teacher then should make a transparency to share with students when the activity begins.
2. Gather materials

Procedures

1. Invite the students to listen to the story of 'Hansel and Gretel' as she reads aloud. Alert students to listen for the main characters, the setting, the conflict, and major action in the story. If needed, the teacher should ask students to take notes on the story elements as it is read.

2. After reading the story, the teacher writes the words -characters-, -setting-, -problem to be solved-, and -rising actions- down one column. The teacher then asks students to share this information about -Hansel and Gretel- and records it on the overhead.

3. Ask, -What do you think the author's purpose was for writing this story?- Invite students to comment. The teacher should share during the discussion that fairy tales were written to teach morals to people at the particular time of history in which they were written. Ask students whether there is still anything to be learned from this story or if it is out of date.

4. Stephen King once said that the real gore in literature can be found in fairy tales. The teacher should share who Stephen King is and that he is a well-know horror author and invite students to comment whether or not they concur with this statement.

5. Ask students to share the character elements of the fairy tale of 'Snow White'. Next, the teacher will share that a modern version has been written and to listen to the modern version to determine if the author's perspective has been compromised or if it's the same. Read the modernized version of 'Snow Write' found in the file attachments.

6. The teacher fosters a classroom discussion comparing and contrasting the original and modernized version. During the conversation, point out that the modern version does not contain the same intent as the author intended and that literature sometimes serves the purpose of that time.

7. Assign students to read their own fairy tales and to note the story elements on a piece of paper to be submitted for assessment. Each correct element will comprise a predetermined point value set by the teacher.

8. The teacher reviews the 6 Traits of Writing rubric for Content with students and assigns them to write a modern version of their fairy tale as was done with Snow White. Explain that students will be accountable for the Content portion only in this assessment.

9. After students complete the assigned writing, the teacher makes the following written assignment: The student will complete a paragraph responding to the question: -What was the author's message or purpose for writing your fairy tale?- If the student states in the response that the author intended to render/ teach a moral lesson through the fairy tale, this is satisfactory achievement.

The student will complete a paragraph responding to the question:
-Stephen King once wrote that the real gore in literature is in the plots of fairy tales. He suggested we modernize the fairy tales to be able to see his point. You have rewritten a fairy tale with a modern flair during this unit. Do you feel that your version has the meaning as the original version. What, if anything seems to get lost in the translation?- The student's response should show some comparison and contrast between the original and modern version.

Assessments

Student competes a written assignment that accurately identifies the character, conflict, setting, and rising action of a fairy tale.

Satisfactory completion of a modernized fairy tale with a score of -3- or higher in the Content area using the 6 Traits of Writing rubric.

The student will complete a paragraph responding to the question: -What was the author's message or purpose for writing your fairy tale?- If the student states in the response that the author intended to render teach a moral lesson through the fairy tale, this is satisfactory achievement.

The student will complete a paragraph responding to the question:
-Stephen King once wrote that the real gore in literature within the plots of fairy tales. He suggested we modernize the fairy tales to be able to see his point. You have rewritten a fairy tale with a modern flair during this unit. Do you feel that your version has the meaning as the original version. What, if anything seems to get lost in the translation?

Extensions

Modernized versions could be compiled into a class booklet for publication purposes.

The teacher and students should be familiar with the Content requirements contained within the 6 Traits of Writing program including the rubric for scoring.

Web Links

Web supplement for What's So Nice About Fairy Tales?
6+1 Traits of Writing

Web supplement for What's So Nice About Fairy Tales?
Six Traits of Writing Assessment

Web supplement for What's So Nice About Fairy Tales?
Ideas for Teaching Writing

Web supplement for What's So Nice About Fairy Tales?
Annotated Tale of Hansel and Gretel

Attached Files

A modernized version of 'Snow White' written by the lesson developer.     File Extension: pdf

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