Beacon Lesson Plan Library

Melt the Ice

Sandi King
Bay District Schools

Description

As students explore the properties of water, they hypothesize how to cause changes from a solid and gas state to a liquid state. Students use their new science knowledge to have an ice cube melt race.

Objectives

The student knows the effects of heating and cooling on solids, liquids and gases.

The student knows the physical properties of ice, water, and steam.

Materials

- The text book, [McGraw-Hill Science]. New York. MacMillan/ McGraw-Hill School Division. 2000. 134 - 141. (Any other text that has a section on changing liquids to solids and gases, especially water, will work just as well.)
- The book, Zoehfeld, Kathleen W. [What Is the World Made Of? All About Solids, Liquids, and Gases]. New York. Scott Foresman. 1998. OR the book, Patten, J.M. [Let's Wonder About Science, Liquid to Gas and Back]. Vero Beach, FL. The Rourke Book Co. Inc. 1995.
- Chart paper and markers
- Access to a freezer
- Hot plate and pot for boiling water
- Many paper towels for drying up water
- Ice cubes, 1 per student or group of students
- The States of Water assessment tool, one per student (Writing or drawing paper can be used instead of the tool provided.) (See unit plan's associated files.)
- Rubric for assessing States of Water (See unit plan's associated files.)

Preparations

1. Locate and preview the text book [McGraw-Hill Science] pages 134 – 141. (Any other text that has a section on changing liquids to solids and gases, especially water, will work just as well.)

2. Locate and preview the book [What Is the World Made Of? All About Solids, Liquids, and Gases] or the book [Let's Wonder About Science, Liquid to Gas and Back].

3. Locate chart paper and markers used for recording students' hypotheses.

4. Gain access to a freezer.

5. Locate a hot plate and a pot for boiling water.

6. Gather many paper towels for drying up water.

7. Obtain ice cubes, one per student or group of students depending on how the “States of Water” race will be conducted.

8. Download and duplicate the “States of Water” assessment tool, one per student (Writing or drawing paper can be used instead of the tool provided.) This is available through the unit plan's associated files.

9. Print the rubric for assessing “States of Water”. ( See #3 above.) Make an overhead transparency of this rubric to discuss with the students. If desired, duplicate the rubric to accompany the assessment when sent home. This will allow parents to know exactly what is expected of their students and to better understand the standards.

10. For assistance in finding the books suggested for this lesson, go to Sunlink on the Web at http://www.sunlink.ucf.edu. This site allows you to find the schools in each county that have a specific book. Follow these instructions: (1) Type the URL in the address line of your browser. The URL is http://www.sunlink.ucf.edu. (2) Click the button for Begin Your Search. (3) Click the part of Florida for your county. (4) Click your specific county. (5) Type the title of the book. No other information needs to be typed here. (6) Click the Find It button. (7) Click the title of the book that appears to receive the Full Record. At the bottom of the Full Record is the location of the book. (8) Request the book from the school shown.

11. Many of these activities can be used with the language arts blocks or periods. For more information on the use of these blocks see the following book. Cunningham, Patricia M., et al. [The Teacher's Guide to the Four Blocks]Greensboro, NC. Carson-Dellosa Publishing Company. Inc. 1999.

Procedures

1. This is lesson plan six of seven lesson plans for the Unit Plan, Our Picnic, The Study of Matter. These activities will be completed on DAY 8 OF THE UNIT. If you are interested in completing the entire unit, please see the Extensions section of this lesson plan.

2. Review the information recorded on Day 7 concerning water changing from a liquid to a solid and a gas. Be sure that students understand that it is the heating and cooling that causes the change.

3. Read and discuss pages 134 – 141 of the text [McGraw-Hill Science] as a review of how the states of matter can change. A diferent text can be substituted if it has a section on changing the states of matter.

4. Read [What Is the World Made Of? All About Solids, Liquids, and Gases] or the book [Let's Wonder About Science, Liquid to Gas and Back]. Discuss the heating and cooling needed to change the states of water.

5. Now that students know that liquid water can be changed into a solid and gas, propose that the solid and gas be changed back into a liquid.

6. Elicit student suggestions as to how to accomplish this change in states of water. Record the students' responses on chart paper. Students should include heating and cooling in their explanations. Give corrective feedback, such as: You are on the right track, but why do you think that happened? Give affirmative feedback, such as: You’ve got it! It is the heat that made the liquid water change to a gas.

7. As a demonstration or as a student participation, perform the procedures suggested by the students. With each demonstration, have the students verbalize that the requirements are heating and cooling.

8. Now that the students have been involved in several procedures to change the states of water, have students use what they have learned in a “State of Water” race. Students are given an ice cube and compete to see who (or which group) can change the solid water back into liquid water first. The liquid water must be observable so can’t be swallowed, washed down the drain, or absorbed in clothing.

9. As a summative assessment, students write and/or illustrate an explanation of the three states of matter using water as the example. Explanations will include how to change one state to another and must include the concepts of cooling and heating. A summative assessment tool, States of Water, is available for this purpose from the unit plan's associated files. Remember that we are assessing these specific science standards, not reading or writing abilities or motor skills, so accommodations should be made for students needing assistance. A rubric for evaluating this assessment is also available from the unit's associated files.

Assessments

This lesson plan is the sixth of seven lesson plans in the Unit Plan, Our Picnic, The Study of Matter. The standards addressed will be formatively assessed as the students observe the three states of water and hypothesize and then test their hypotheses as to how to cause the states of water to change. The teacher will give corrective and affirmative feedback.

Students complete the summative assessment, States of Water, using the tool and rubric from the unit plan's associated files. (See Extensions.)

Extensions

1. The Beacon Unit Plan associated with this lesson can be viewed by clicking on the link located at the top of this page or by using the following URL: http://www.beaconlearningcenter.com/search/details.asp?item=2954. Once you select the unit’s link, scroll to the bottom of the unit plan page to find the section, “Associated Files.” This section contains links to the Unit Plan Overview, Diagnostic and Summative Assessments, and other associated files (if any).

2. A fun demonstration of the states of matter is to crush up two Alka-Seltzers and pour into a balloon. Then, without letting any of the Alka-Seltzer fall from the balloon, stretch the balloon over a small pop bottle that contains about 1/3 cup water. Lift the balloon, allowing the two ingredients to mix. They will form a gas that will then fill the balloon. The smaller the bottle, the more gas that will escape into the balloon. Students can visualize this demonstration of the three states of matter and how they can be interrelated.

Web Links

This teacher resource is for locating appropriate books for this lesson and unit.
SunLink

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