Beacon Lesson Plan Library

Franklin Roosevelt and the Dime

Sandi King
Bay District Schools

Description

How many terms can a president serve? Franklin Delano Roosevelt served four terms. Learn about his life, presidency, monument, and tributes to him through stories and poems. Students will also learn the attributes of a dime.

Objectives

The student counts orally to 100 or more by 1s, 2s, 5s, and 10s using a hundred chart or concrete materials.

The student knows and compares the values of a penny (1 cent), nickel (5 cents), and dime (10 cents).

The student knows selected patriotic songs associated with the United States.

The student listens to, views, and discusses stories, poems, and other media about selected American symbols that have emerged from past events, legends, and historical accounts (for example, the eagle, the Liberty Bell, George Washington as the 'father of our country,' the American flag).

The student listens to, views, and discusses stories, poems, and other media about selected important buildings, statues, and monuments associated with state and national history.

Materials

- Student Web Poem, A Real Hero. This is a Beacon Learning Center product.

- A computer and AV/TV or computer lab

- Various pictures of Franklin Delano Roosevelt

- Patriotic music

- The comic section of the Sunday newspaper

- One dime for each student

- Book
Adler, David A. [A Picture Book of Eleanor Roosevelt]. New York. Holiday House. 1991.

- Gray construction paper cut into a circle. See the pattern and instructions in the associated files. You will need one per student.

- Cut out black profiles of Franklin Roosevelt duplicated from the associated files. You will need one per student.

Preparations

1. Preview the Student Web Poem, A Real Hero available in Weblinks. Because of the audio attached, the download time for each page is long. To reduce this waiting time, download each page prior to the students using the story. The pages will be stored on your computer for quick and easy student access as long as your Internet access is maintained. When you close your Internet access or shut down your computer, you will need to preload this poem again.

2. Locate a computer and AV/TV or computer lab. The AV/TV is a TV that will allow the Student Web Poem to be displayed large enough for students to view as a large group. Preferably, students should be able to visit a computer lab where pairs of students can do the Student Web Poem. Ask your media specialist for more assistance.

3. Locate various pictures of Franklin Roosevelt.

4. Locate and preview recordings of patriotic music. Your music teacher is a good source for this recording. If one is not available, perhaps the music teacher will agree to produce a piano (or other instrumental) version. Collect enough music so that a different song is used for each day.

5. Collect enough dimes for each student to be able to hold one while discussing the attributes of a dime.

6. Locate and preview the book [A Picture Book of Eleanor Roosevelt]. (See Materials.)

7. Locate gray construction paper. Cut the paper into a circle using pinking shears to make grooved edges. See the pattern and instructions in the associated files. You will need one per student.

8. Cut out black profiles of Franklin Roosevelt duplicated from the associated files. You will need one per student.

9. Use Sunlink to locate books and other media available in your district of Florida. (See the Weblinks area of this lesson plan.)

10. Preview patriotic music at http://www.treefort.org/~rgrogan/web/flagmusic.htm or from the Weblinks. A variety of patriotic music is available from this site.

Note: These specific books and resources may not be available to you. For the purpose of meeting the standard, any book, video, or other resource may be substituted for the ones mentioned above as long as the students can listen to and view the story or poem pertaining to Franklin Roosevelt, the Franklin Delano Roosevelt Memorial, and our tribute to him on the dime.

Procedures

1. This lesson plan is associated with the Beacon Learning Center Unit Plan, Mr. President. If you are completing this lesson as part of the unit, be sure to review previous information about Presidents' Day, Abraham Lincoln, and George Washington as a lead-in to today's lesson on Franklin Roosevelt. A link to the unit is available in the Extensions section of this lesson plan.

2. As students are entering, play patriotic music. If students know the song, encourage them to sing it. At the conclusion of the song, identify the song and give some fact about its inclusion as a patriotic song. For example, “My Country ‘Tis of Thee” is a song about the freedom we have in America. After singing this new patriotic song, review other songs that the students have sung.

3. Hand each student a real dime. Initiate a discussion as to the person on the dime. (Answer: Franklin Roosevelt.) Why might he be there? (Answers: He was our 32nd president. He helped our country grow strong after WWII and during the Depression when many Americans were so poor that they were starving to death.) What is on the back of the dime? (Answer: A torch and olive branch, both standing for peace.)

4. The standards addressed in this lesson state that the students will LISTEN TO, VIEW and DISCUSS stories, poems, and other media about selected American symbols that have emerged from past events, legends, historical accounts, and important buildings, statues and monuments associated with state and national history. In this lesson, students listen to and view various media including a Student Web Poem. The materials recommended are examples of those that may be used. If you are familiar with additional materials that students can listen to, view, and discuss that pertain to Franklin Roosevelt, feel free to use your materials. Care must be given to select media that addresses the man, his symbols, and his monument. The Student Web Poem that accompanies this lesson is an excellent resource, as it was developed to meet the standards.

5. During group reading time, read the books listed. Be sure to show the pictures and encourage discussion at appropriate intervals throughout the reading of the book. A formative assessment occurs as feedback is given to the students during the discussion. Be sure to give affirmative feedback, such as, "Right, President Roosevelt did have a wheelchair." Also give corrective feedback, such as, "No, Eleanor Roosevelt was not the president. We have not yet had a lady president. Who was the president when Eleanor Roosevelt lived in the White House?"

6. During whole group discussion time (unit time), read selected Sunday comics to the students. Discuss the fact that when FDR was our president, many people were so poor that they could not buy a newspaper. He said that all children should be able to read the comics, so each Sunday President Roosevelt would have his ”fireside chat” and read the comics to the children of America over the radio. We had no TV then because it had not yet been invented, so no one could see him reading. They could only listen. He is no longer alive, so we can’t see him on TV reading the comics, but we can see his face on a dime. Pass out a dime to each student. Discuss the attributes of the dime (round, smaller than a quarter, gray or silver in color, used to be made of silver, but now only silver colored, grooved edges that are much smaller than a quarter, Franklin Roosevelt on the front, torch, olive branch, and oak brance on the back, which side is called “heads” or “tails” and why, value is ten cents, when counting dimes, we count by tens). Other important facts about FDR and his presidency, including his four terms in office and his disability, are available from the associated files.

7. During small group, students listen to, view, and discuss the Student Web Poem, A Real Hero available from Weblinks. This is a product of Beacon Learning Center. Students gain the most learning when pairs use Student Web Stories. This facilitates discussion between students and students learn best when actively engaged in discussing what is being learned. After all students have had an opportunity to view the Web poem, a discussion should be held. The discussion and formative feedback given, as a result of this Web poem, are important parts of this activity.

8. During centers or activity time, have students glue FDR’s profile onto the construction paper coin.

9. During math time, review the attributes of a dime discussed earlier. Pass out tens cards. Have the students hold up the tens cards in counting order. Practice orally counting by tens to one hundred as the cards are shown. Allow other students to hold the cards as the class counts again. Write the numbers 10, 20, 30, 40, 50, 60, 70, 80, 90, and 100 on the board. Practice saying these numbers in counting order with the students. Praise that they can now count to one hundred by tens. Encourage individual students to count orally for the class. Play a game of counting to one hundred by tens without looking at the board. Do this counting orally with the whole group, small groups, and individuals until students have heard this counting at least twenty times. Repetition causes this counting to become part of a student’s long-term memory. Counting in lots of different situations (individually, not looking, just boys, girls with bangs, everyone whose name starts with a B, etc.) is important for this movement of information into memory.) If you are doing this lesson as part of the Beacon Unit Plan: Mr. President, review the attributes of a penny and quarter, comparing and contrasting properties of a penny, quarter, and dime.

Note: Begin the summative assessment of orally counting to one hundred by TENS anytime you feel a student is ready to count. This is an individual assessment. Some students will be ready today, while others will need further instruction or practice. A tool for the summative assessment is available from the associated files that are part of the unit plan. See the Extensions section for a link to the unit and assessments.

10. Have groups of students put their homemade dimes in a stack. Then select someone from the group to count the stack of dimes. Reinforce that students will be counting by tens. Reinforce the one-to-one correspondence that is occurring as students count the coins. (One coin is worth 10 cents, so if we are counting cents, we must say 10.) Be sure to give formative feedback. Give affirmative feedback, such as. "Right, one dime is ten cents so you say 10." Also, give corrective feedback, such as, "This is one dime, but it is not one cent. We are counting the cents. How many cents is one dime?"

11. Additional teacher information and patterns for the homemade dime are available from the associated files.

Assessments

1. Formative assessment will be administered as described in the Procedures section. Affirmative and corrective feedback must be given. Student learning is enhanced with feedback from formative assessment. This should be administered as often as possible.

2. If using this lesson plan as part of the Beacon Learning Center Unit Plan, Mr. President, a summative assessment is provided. This is Summative Assessment #2, Assessment Poem #4, “Four-time Winner." See the instructions in the unit plan for administering this assessment. This assessment should be administered beginning on day 7 of the unit. A practice assessment to assist students in taking this style assessment is available with Summative Assessment #2. This assessment is available from the unit plan's associated files. See Extensions for the link.

3. Begin the summative assessment of orally counting to one hundred by TENS anytime you feel a student is ready to count. This is an individual assessment. A tool for the summative assessment is available from the associated files that are part of the unit plan. This is Summative Assessment #1, Let's Count. See Extensions for the link to the unit and assessments.

Extensions

1. The Beacon Unit Plan associated with this lesson can be viewed by clicking on the link located at the top of this page or by using the following URL: http://www.beaconlearningcenter.com/search/details.asp?item=2944. Once you select the unit’s link, scroll to the bottom of the unit plan page to find the section, “Associated Files.” This section contains links to the Unit Plan Overview, Diagnostic and Summative Assessments, and other associated files (if any).

2.The Student Web Poem can be used as a shared reading activity teaching phonics. It is an excellent opportunity for a picture walk. The characteristics of this poem (rhyming words, rhythm, etc.) can be taught or reviewed. The use of actual photographics as illustrations can be discussed.

3. Appropriate art activities can be added to enhance student's knowledge of FDR.

4. Students can complete the Student Web Poem in small groups or in a whole group setting according to the availability of technology. Many school media centers now have a computer projector that will project the enlarged computer screen allowing for class use of the Student Web Poem.

Web Links

To enhance teacher comfort in instructing about Franklin Roosevelt, exploration of these web sites is recommended. Gives great information about the life of Franklin Roosevelt.
History, Franklin D. Roosevelt, Thirty-Second President 1933-1945

Information about the Franklin Delano Roosevelt Memorial.
Monuments & Memorials – Franklin Delano Roosevelt Memorial

Has a wealth of information about FDR's life, presidency, and memorial.
Franklin Delano Roosevelt

Information about the various U. S. coins.
Fact Monster, U. S. Coins

A variety of patriotic music is available.
Patriotic Music

A search site for media in Florida public schools.
SUNLINK

Use this Student Web Poem to follow the presidency of Franklin Delano Roosevelt as we learn that we can be anything we want to be. Audio is available.
A Real Hero

Attached Files

Teacher information     File Extension: pdf

Pattern for the homemade dime     File Extension: pdf

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