Beacon Lesson Plan Library

In Line with Time

Laurie Ayers
Bay District Schools

Description

This lesson is for Day 4 of the unit [Inventions and Inventors]. Students participate in constructing timelines of significant contributions in the field of communication. Class interaction follows to provide practice in interpreting the order of events.

Objectives

The student reads and organizes information (for example, in story maps, graphs, charts) for different purposes (for example, being informed, following directions, making a report, conducting interviews, taking a test, performing a task).

The student uses a variety of reference materials to gather information, including multiple representations of information (for example, maps, charts, photos).

The student writes for a variety of occasions, audiences, and purposes (for example, letters to invite or thank, stories or poems to entertain, information to record).

The student understands how scientific discoveries have helped or hindered progress regarding human health and lifestyles.

The student reads and interprets a single timeline identifying the order of events (for example, in ancient times).

The student knows selected significant people and the impact of their achievements in world in the fields of communication and technology since the Renaissance.

The student understands ways these devices impacted society.

Materials

-Photographs of the teacher with approximate dates
-Light colored bulletin board paper (about 8 feet long and 2 feet wide)
-Markers
-Communication Invention Cards (see associated file)
-Homework Assignment note (see associated file), one per student
-Sample Timeline (see associated file), one for the teacher
-12”x18” construction paper, one piece per student and one for the teacher to use when modeling (light color)
-Tape
-Small sticky notes
-Student Web Lesson [Max and Mavis and the Case of the Missing Inventors, Part 1: Communication]

Preparations

1. Gather 5-8 photos of memorable events in your life. Write the year of each photo on a small sticky note and attach the notes to the photos.
2. View Sample Timeline in associated file.
3. Gather other materials.
4. Cut bulletin board paper for the Communication Invention Timeline 8’ long and 2’ wide. Write the title of the timeline at the top.
5. Download and make a copy of the Communication Invention Cards (see associated file). Cut out the cards. Optional: Glue the cards onto construction paper and laminate before cutting. This will make them sturdier.
6. Download and make copies of the Homework Assignment Note, one per student and one for the teacher to use while modeling (see associated file).
7. Make arrangements with the school media specialist for your students to conduct research in the media center on Day 5.

Procedures

1. Review the previous day’s focus on communication inventions/inventors, their impact on society or how they helped or hindered, how to read and organize information, and using a variety of reference materials by revisiting the Great Invention Summary sheets displayed in the classroom.

2. Display five photographs of yourself at different stages in your life that reflect memorable occasions and the dates of the occasions (for example, elementary school, high school graduation, first car, graduating from college, wedding, etc.).

3. Allow time for students to view the photos.

4. Ask students if they know time can be shown as a picture. Elicit and discuss student responses.

5. Explain today they will learn about timelines. A timeline is a method for picturing or seeing time. Historians take events and place them on a timeline in order. The timeline gives a picture of events during a period of time.

6. Draw a large timeline on a dry erase board, chalkboard, or chart paper (see Sample Timeline in associated file). As you draw, explain the process of making a timeline (i.e., the long line that represents the period of time, the vertical lines on the timeline that represent specific times in the time period, etc.) Discuss the beginning and ending of the timeline and how events are arranged in order from earliest to most recent.

7. Ask students if they will help you arrange your photos in order on the timeline.

8. Call on student volunteers to place your photos in the correct order at the top of the vertical lines drawn on the timeline. Students also add dates of the events at the bottom of the vertical lines.

9. Discuss the timeline. Model how to read the timeline and interpret the order of events. Model how to make statements about the order of events such as:
I got my first car before I got married.
I got married after I graduated from college.

10. Ask student volunteers to read the timeline and make statements about the order of events. For example, “You got your first car after you graduated from high school.”

11. Tell students now they will get an opportunity to make a timeline.

12. Give each student a Communication Invention Card (see associated file).

13. Point out that the names of communication inventions and the date they were invented are printed on the cards.

14. Explain when you give the signal, students are to arrange themselves in order according to the dates of the inventions on their cards from earliest to most recent.

15. Give the signal to start.

16. The teacher guides students in arranging themselves in the right order.

17. When time is up, check the order.

18. Make vertical lines on the timeline (created using the long strip of bulletin board paper) and attach the Communication Invention Cards in the right order according to date.

19. Display the Class Communication Timeline in the classroom.

20. Students return to their desks and are asked to make statements about the order of events on the timeline. For example: The personal computer was invented after the television.

21. Provide formative feedback that is both positive (Yes, the telephone was invented before the computer.) and guiding (Look at the timeline again. Which comes first, the telegraph or the television?). Clarify any misconceptions.

22. Review timelines and order of events.

23. Distribute Homework Assignment Note (see associated file) and a large piece of construction paper to each student.

24. Discuss and model the Homework Assignment. Make sure students understand what they are to do. Note: You could use the events in the Sample Timeline to model the homework assignment.

25. On the following day collect the timelines. Check the statements made by students about their timelines to make sure they demonstrate understanding of interpreting the order of events. Provide formative feedback that is both positive and guiding on a sticky note.

26. Return the papers to students so they can self-reflect upon the formative feedback. Ask students to remove the sticky notes with formative feedback.

27. Display the student timelines and designate a time for viewing.

28. Students complete journal entries according to the Daily Journal Prompts (see extensions).

29. Formatively assess journal entries using the Unit Writing Checklist in the Unit Attachment (see extensions). Provide feedback that is both positive and guiding. Positive feedback might include, “I agree, the telephone has greatly impacted our daily lives.” Guiding feedback might include, “I can tell you like to send messages to your friends, but tell how the computer has helped you send messages.”

30. Remind students to be working on Summative Assessment 1, Interview Projects at home.

31. Students continue working in pairs to complete the Student Web Lesson [Max and Mavis and the Case of the Missing Inventors, Part 1: Communication] (see Weblinks). To facilitate learning, it is suggested that the teacher pair an accomplished reader with an emerging reader.

Assessments

Formatively assess student homework assignments to determine student performance in reading and interpreting a single timeline identifying the order of events. Check timelines for correct order of events. Interpretation statements for the order of events should accurately reflect the order of events arranged on the timelines. Provide formative feedback that is both positive (You are right! You did learn to ride a bike after you started elementary school.) and guiding (Let’s look at the dates for your events again. Would 1996 come before or after 2000?)

Formatively assess student journal entries using the Unit Writing Checklist found in the Unit Attachment (see extensions). Check journal entries to make sure students identify a communication invention and state an authentic way it has impacted his/her life. Provide formative feedback that is both positive (Terrific! The telephone has made it easier for us to talk with each other.) and guiding (Yes, it is fun to have a cell phone, but how has having a cell phone impacted your life?).

Extensions

1. The Beacon Unit Plan associated with this lesson can be viewed by clicking on the link located at the top of this page or by using the following URL: http://www.beaconlearning center.com/search/details.asp?item=3005. Once you select the unit’s link, scroll to the bottom of the unit plan page to find the section, “Associated Files.” This section contains links to the Unit Plan Overview, Diagnostic and Summative Assessments, and other associated files (if any).
2. The Student Web Lesson [Max and Mavis and the Case of the Missing Inventors, Part 1: Communication] may be viewed by the whole class on a large screen monitor as a means of review.
3. Note: Throughout the unit, students do write for a variety of occasions and reasons, therefore the need for writing for a variety of occasions is met by the end of the unit.

Web Links

Web supplement for In Line With Time
Education World - Timelines: Timeless Teaching Tools

Web supplement for In Line With Time
Academy for the Advancement of Science and Technology: Invention and Design

Web supplement for In Line With Time
The Great Idea Finder: History Facts and Myths

Web supplement for In Line With Time
Famous Inventors from A-Z

Web supplement for In Line With Time
The National Inventors Hall of Fame

Web supplement for In Line With Time
Just Read Now

Web supplement for In Line With Time
Inventions and Inventors

A museum is broken into and the thief mismatches pictures of inventions and inventors. Students are asked to help solve the mystery while learning about significant inventions and inventors in the field of communication since the Renaissance.
Max and Mavis and the Case of the Missing Inventors, Part 1: Communication

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